Loading...

PSYCH406: Gender and Sexuality

Unit 3: Sexuality and Gender Identity   In the past few units, we have identified sex as the physical and biological characteristics of being either male or female.  We will now learn that gender identity refers to the individual’s experience of being either male or female.  Please note that typically, one’s biological sex aligns with his or her gender identity as well—though there are cases in which the two differ. 

Both sexual identity and gender identity are typically understood in terms of differences.  That is, female gender identity is understood in terms of the ways in which it is different from male gender identity, and vice versa.  The goal of this unit is to explain and outline the different ways our sexual and gender identities can impact our lives.

Unit 3 Time Advisory
This unit should take you approximately 10 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 3.1: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 3.2: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 3.3: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 3.4: 3 hours

Unit3 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this section, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of differences between gender identities, including theoretical approaches.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the definitions of sexuality, including sexual orientation, sexual identity, homosexuality, heterosexuality, lesbian/gay and bisexuality.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the historical perspectives of homosexuality.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the biological theories of homosexuality.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical approaches to gender identity.

3.1 List of Terms   - Reading: Carnegie Mellon University Women's Center: “Feminism and Women’s Studies Sexual Identity and Gender Identity Glossary” Link: Carnegie Mellon University Women's Center: “Feminism and Women’s Studies Sexual Identity and Gender Identity Glossary” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this material.  Note that this reading will cover the material you need to know for all subunits in section 3.1 (3.1.1 through 3.1.7).
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.1.1 Sexuality   3.1.2 Sexual Orientation   3.1.3 Sexual Identity   3.1.4 Heterosexuality   3.1.5 Homosexuality   3.1.6 Lesbian/Gay   3.1.7 Bisexuality   3.2 Homosexuality   3.2.1 Historical Perspectives on Homosexuality   - Reading: George Washington University: Bonnie J. Morris, Ph.D.’s “History of Lesbian, Gay, & Bisexual Social Movements” Link: George Washington University: Bonnie J. Morris, Ph.D.’s “History of Lesbian, Gay, & Bisexual Social Movements” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this material.  Note that this reading will cover the material you need to know for subunits 3.2.1 and 3.2.2.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.2.2 Homosexuality as Mental Disorder   3.2.3 Genetics: Biological Origin of Homosexuality   3.2.4 Research for “Homosexual Genes”   - Reading: AllPsych Journal: Ryan D. Johnson’s “Homosexuality: Nature or Nurture” Link: AllPsych Journal: Ryan D. Johnson’s “Homosexuality: Nature or Nurture”(HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this article, which discusses both the environmental and genetic arguments relating to homosexuality.  Note that this reading will cover the material you need to know for subunits 3.2.4 and 3.2.5
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.2.5 Gene-Environment Interactions   3.2.6 A Gay Brain?   - Web Media: University of California, San Francisco: Louann Brizendine, Ph.D.’s “The Gay Brain Explained” Link: University of California, San Francisco: Louann Brizendine, Ph.D.’s “The Gay Brain Explained” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: View this brief 2-minute clip.  Note that this viewing will cover the material you need to know for subunit 3.2.6. 
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.3 Theoretical Approaches   - Lecture: University of Houston: Herb W. Agan, Ed.D.’s “Psychological Theories of Gender Role Development” Link: University of Houston: Herb W. Agan, Ed.D.’s “Psychological Theories of Gender Role Development” (YouTube)
 
Also Available in:
Adobe Flash
 
Instructions: View this lecture, which presents various psychological theories of gender role development.  Note that this viewing will cover the material you need to know for all subunits in section 3.3 (3.3.1 through 3.3.6).
 
This lecture is approximately 1 hour, 6 minutes in length.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.3.1 Essentialism Theory   3.3.2 People are Stable, Fixed and Fundamental to their Sense of Selves   3.3.3 Social Constructivists   3.3.4 Behavior is Based on Social Roles and Context   3.3.5 Essentialism vs. Social Constructivists   3.3.6 Challenges to Essentialism   3.4 Gender Identity   - Lecture: University of Houston: Herb W. Agan, Ed.D.’s “Psychological Theories of Gender Role Development”  Link: University of Houston: Herb W. Agan, Ed.D.’s “Psychological Theories of Gender Role Development” (Adobe Flash)
 
Instructions: View this lecture.  Note that this viewing will cover the material you need to know for all subunits in section 3.4 (3.4.1 through 3.4.8). 
 
This lecture is approximately 1hour, 16 minutes long.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.4.1 What Is Gender Identity?   3.4.2 Gender Identity Treatment Begins at Birth   3.4.3 Two Years: Learned Applicable Gender Labels   3.4.4 Three Years: Gender Labeling Others   3.4.5 Gender Constancy: Stability and Consistency   3.4.6 Biological-Environmental Interaction of Gender Identity   3.4.7 Latency Stage (Six Years to Puberty)   3.4.8 Genital Stage (Puberty Through Adult Life)