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PSYCH405: Theories of Personality

Unit 6: Social-Cognitive and Emotional Factors of Personality   Because our cognitive structures relay important information from our surroundings and because our personalities can affect this process, our personalities can affect the ways in which we perceive, interpret, and, in general, use information.  In turn, cognitive information can impact how we feel.  As such, personality traits influence both our cognitive and emotional states.  The next unit will focus on these social-cognitive and emotional aspects of personality.  Once again, we will look at another “classical voice” in personality whose theory focuses on the social nature of learning and personality development.  After learning about Albert Bandura, the father of social-cognitive theory of personality and the main tenants of the theory, you will learn about emotion as it relates to personality.  You will gain knowledge about the interactions between cognitive and emotional processes which play a role in the expression of personality.  

Unit 6 Time Advisory
This unit will take you 25 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 6.1: 7 hours

☐    Subunit 6.2: 4 hours

☐    Subunit 6.3: 4 hours

☐    Subunit 6.4: 5 hours

☐    Subunit 6.5: 5 hours

Unit6 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  • Identify the main components and tenants of social-cognitive theory.
  • Describe the intrapersonal and interpersonal function of emotion and the research that relates this to happiness and well-being.
  • Define the various emotion regulation strategies and the costs-benefits of relying on suppression as a means of coping with difficult emotions.
  • Identify the theory/concept, methodology and major findings of the empirical journal articles on emotion research.

6.1 Albert Bandura and the Social-Cognitive Theory of Personality   - Lecture: University of California, Berkeley: Professor Oliver John’s Wednesday 11/23: Social Cognitive Factors," “Monday 11/28: Review Session” and “Wednesday 11/30: Motivation" The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

[Submit Materials](http://www.saylor.org/contribute/)

6.1.1 Albert Bandura   - Reading: Information on Self-Efficacy: Community of Scholar’s version of Professor Albert Bandura’s “Autobiography” Link: Information on Self-Efficacy: Community of Scholar’s version of Professor Albert Bandura’s "Autobiography" (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the entirety of this webpage.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above. 

6.1.2 Cognitive-Theory of Personality   - Reading: Dr. C. George Boeree’s Personality Theories: “Albert Bandura” and Emory University: Information on Self-Efficacy: Community of Scholar’s version of Professor Albert Bandura’s “The Role of Imitation in Personality Development” Links: Dr. C. George Boeree’s Personality Theories: "Albert Bandura" (HTML) and Emory University: Information on Self-Efficacy: Community of Scholar’s version of Professor Albert Bandura’s “The Role of Imitation in Personality Development” (PDF)
 
Instructions: For the first reading, read the entirety of the webpage for a biography and information on the theories of Albert Bandura.  For the second reading, please scroll down the webpage to the hyperlink for Albert Bandura’s 1963 article entitled “The Role of Imitation in Personality Development,” and download the PDF file.  Please read this article in its entirety.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.1.3 Self-Efficacy and Agency   - Reading: Emory University: Information on Self-Efficacy: Community of Scholar’s version of Professor Frank Parajes’s “Overview of Social Cognitive Theory and of Self-Efficacy” Link: Emory University: Information on Self-Efficacy: Community of Scholar’s version of Professor Frank Parajes’s "Overview of Social Cognitive Theory and of Self-Efficacy" (HTML)
                       
Instructions: Please read the entirety of this webpage.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.2 Intrapersonal Function of Emotion   - Reading: Wikibook’s "Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience/Motivation and Emotion" and University of California, Berkeley: Dr. Robert Levenson’s Psychophysiology’s Lab’s (1999) “The Intrapersonal Function of Emotions” Link: Wikibook’s "Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience/Motivation and Emotion" (HTML) and University of California, Berkeley: Dr. Robert Levenson’s Psychophysiology’s Lab’s (1999) “The Intrapersonal Function of Emotions” (PDF)
 
Instructions: For the first reading, please read this overview of some major findings in key research areas related to motivation and emotions.   For the second reading, under the date 1999, please select the first PDF file entitled “The Intrapersonal Function of Emotions.”  Please read the entirety of this article to learn about the basics regarding the function of emotions.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.2.1 Drives and Motives   6.2.2 Emotions and their Neurological Underpinnings   6.2.3 Theories of Emotions   6.2.4 Emotions and Psychopathology   6.2.5 Protypical Events and Associated Emotions   6.2.6 Modulations of Emotions   6.2.7 Function of Emotions   6.3 Emotion Regulation and Suppression   - Reading: University of California, Berkeley: Dr. Robert Levenson’s Psychophysiology’s Lab’s “Emotional Suppression: Physiology, Self-Report, and Expressive Behavior,” and “Hiding feelings: The acute effects of inhibiting negative and positive emotion” Links: University of California, Berkeley: Dr. Robert Levenson’s Psychophysiology’s Lab’s “Emotional Suppression: Physiology, Self-Report, and Expressive Behavior” (PDF) and “Hiding feelings: The Acute Effects of Inhibition Negative and Positive Emotion”(PDF)
 
Instructions: For the first reading, please scroll down to the date 1993, and click on the PDF file entitled “Emotional Suppression: Physiology, Self-Report, and Expressive Behavior.”  Please read this article in its entirety.  For the second reading, please scroll down to the date 1997 and click on the PDF file entitled “Hiding Feelings: The Acute Effect of Inhibition, Negative and Positive Emotion.”  Please read the entirety of this article to learn about suppression, which is a type of emotion regulation strategy.
           
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.3.1 Emotion Regulation   6.3.2 Emotional Suppression and Health   6.3.3 Emotional Suppression, Expressive Behavior, Self-Report, and Physiology   6.3.4 Effects of Inhibiting Negative and Positive Emotions   6.4 Emotion and Aging   - Reading: University of California, Berkeley: M.N. Shiota’s and Dr. Robert Levenson’s Psychophysiology’s Lab’s “Effects of Aging on Experimentally Instructed Detached Reappraisal, Positive Reappraisal, and Emotional Behavior Suppression,” and Wikipedia’s version of Dr. Laura L. Carstensen and Dr. Joseph A. Mikels’s “At the Intersection of Emotion and Cognition: Aging and the Positivity Effect” Links: University of California, Berkeley: M.N. Shiota’s and Dr. Robert Levenson’s Psychophysiology’s Lab’s “Effects of Aging on Experimentally Instructed Detached Reappraisal, Positive Reappraisal, and Emotional Behavior Suppression” (PDF) and Wikipedia’s version of Dr. Laura L. Carstensen and Dr. Joseph A. Mikels’s "At the Intersection of Emotion and Cognition: Aging and the Positivity Effect" (HTML)
 
Instructions: For the first reading, please scroll up to the date 2009, and click on the PDF file entitled “Effects of Aging on Experimentally Instructed Detached Reappraisal, Positive Reappraisal, and Emotional Behavior Suppression.”  Please read the entirety of this article to learn about different types of emotion regulation strategies and how they intersect with age.  For the second reading, please click on the link above and scroll down to the bottom of the webpage under “External Link.”  Then, click on the first hyperlink with the PDF icon to download the PDF file.  Read this article in its entirety.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Lecture: University of California, Berkeley: Professor Oliver John’s "Monday 12/5: Emotion Regulation/Review" The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

    Submit Materials

6.4.1 Aging and Emotion Regulation   6.4.2 Detached Reappraisal, Positive Reappraisal, and Behavior Suppression   6.4.3 Socioemotional Selectivity Theory   6.5 Emotions: Contributors to Happiness and Interpersonal Functioning   - Reading: University of California, Berkeley: Dr. Robert Levenson’s Psychophysiology’s Lab’s “Affect in Intimate Relationships: The Developmental Course of Marriage” and The Dana Foundation: Dr. Silvia Helena Cardoso’s “Hardwired for Happiness” Links: University of California, Berkeley: Dr. Robert Levenson’s Psychophysiology’s Lab’s “Affect in Intimate Relationships: The Developmental Course of Marriage” (PDF) and The Dana Foundation: Dr. Silvia Helena Cardoso’s "Hardwired for Happiness" (HTML)
 
Instructions: These readings cover subunits 6.5.1-6.5.7.  For the first reading, please scroll down to the date 1996, and click on the first PDF file entitled “Affect in Intimate Relationships: The Developmental Course of Marriage.”  Please read the entirety of this article to learn about some relationships between emotion and interpersonal processes.  Please also read “Hardwired for Happiness” in its entirety.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

6.5.1 The Expression and Experience of Emotion and Marriage   6.5.2 A Theoretical Framework for Emotional Development and Intimacy in Adulthood   6.5.3 The History of Emotion Neuroscience   6.5.4 The Neural Basis of Positive Affect   6.5.5 A Set-Point for Happiness   6.5.6 Toward a Definition of Happiness   6.5.7 Psychological Perspectives of Happiness