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PSYCH404: Psychotherapy

Unit 1: An Introduction to Psychotherapy   What is psychotherapy, who needs it, and how is it conducted? Is psychotherapy really only for “crazy” people? This unit will address these and other basic questions about the field. We will take a look at the historical development of its practice, identify the qualities most useful in a psychotherapist, and discuss the different ways in which psychotherapy affects both patient and counselor. 

Unit 1 Time Advisory
This unit will take you approximately 9.5 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 1.1: 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 1.2: 1.5 hours
       
☐    Subunit 1.3: 7.5 hours

☐    Subunit 1.3.1: 1.5 hours

☐    Subunit 1.3.2: 1.5 hours

☐    Subunit 1.3.3: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 1.3.4: 1.5 hours

☐    Subunit 1.3.5: 2 hours

Unit1 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  • define psychotherapy and describe the historical development of its practice;
  • identify the qualities most useful in a psychotherapist; and
  • discuss the different ways in which psychotherapy affects both patient/client and counselor/therapist.

1.1 A Short History of Psychotherapy   1.1.1 Ancient Greeks and Primitive Techniques   - Reading: psychcentral.com: Jim Haggerty, MD’s “History of Psychotherapy” Link: psychcentral.com: Jim Haggerty, MD’s “History of Psychotherapy” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link above and read through the brief overview of the history of psychotherapy. This reading will provide you with an overview of the history of the field. This introduction will be of use to you as you work through the more in-depth explanations of various types of therapy in later units. Note that this reading covers 1.1.1-1.1.7.
 
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1.1.2 Middle Ages and Demonic Possession   1.1.3 Walter Dendy and “Psycho-therapeia”   1.1.4 Sigmund Freud and the Development of Psychoanalysis   1.1.5 The Change from Psychoanalysis to Behaviorism   1.1.6 The Notion of Warmth: Rogerian and Interpersonal   1.1.7 Current and Future Notions of Therapy   1.2 The Counselor as a Person   1.2.1 Personal Characteristics of Effective Counselors   - Reading: Monroecollege: Gerald Corey’s Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy: “The Counselor as a Person and as a Professional” Link: Monroecollege: Gerald Corey’s Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy: “The Counselor as a Person and as a Professional” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read Gerald Corey’s chapter titled “The Counselor: Person and Professional.” While reading, consider the traits successful counselors tend to share, the challenges they face, and the ethical dilemmas they frequently encounter. Note that this reading applies to subunits 1.2.1-1.2.5

 Reading this chapter should take approximately 1 hour and 30
minutes.   
    
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1.2.2 Challenges Faced by Counselors   1.2.3 Values in Counseling   1.2.4 Counselor Ethics   1.2.5 Cultural Issues in Therapy   1.3 Ethical Issues in Counseling   1.3.1 Ethical Decision Making   - Reading: KSPope.com: Dr. Michael C. Gottlieb’s “Avoiding Exploitive Dual Relationships: A Decision-Making Model” Link: KSPope.com: Dr. Michael C. Gottlieb’s “Avoiding Exploitive Dual Relationships: A Decision-Making Model” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the above link and read the associated article in its entirety. The article discusses one common ethical dilemma that can arise in therapy (the dual relationship) and provides an overview of ethical decision-making models. Take note of the helpful case studies of situations in which this decision-making model could be used.
 
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1.3.2 Informed Consent   - Reading: The American Psychological Association’s “Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct: Standard 10: Therapy” Link: The American Psychological Association’s “Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct: Standard 10: Therapy” (HTML)
 
Instructions: The above link will bring you to the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct Table of Contents. Click on Standard 10 “Therapy” on the right side of the page, and read through the ethical principles as they apply to therapy. Note that this link applies to subunits 1.3.2 and 1.3.3.
 
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1.3.3 Confidentiality   - Reading: The American Psychological Association’s “Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct: Standard 4: Privacy and Confidentiality” Link: The American Psychological Association’s “Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct: Standard 4: Privacy and Confidentiality” (HTML)
 
Instructions: The above link will bring you to the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct Table of Contents. Click on Standard 4 “Privacy and Confidentiality” on the right side of the page, for an overview of the requirements related to privacy and confidentiality.
 
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1.3.4 Ethical Decisions in Assessment   - Reading: The American Psychological Association’s “Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct: Standard 9: Assessment” Link:The American Psychological Association’s “Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct: Standard 9: Assessment” (HTML)
 
Instructions: The above link will bring you to the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct Table of Contents. Click on Standard 9 “Assessment” for an overview of the ethical requirements related to assessment. Notice that there are ethical issues related to all steps of assessment, from informed consent to interpreting and explaining the results.  
 
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1.3.5 The Importance of Evidence-Based Practices   - Reading: The American Psychological Association’s “Report of the 2005 Presidential Task force on Evidence-Based Practice” and “APA Policy Statement on Evidence-Based Practice” Links: The American Psychological Association’s “Report of the 2005 Presidential Task force on Evidence-Based Practice” (PDF) and “APA Policy Statement on Evidence-Based Practice” (PDF)
 
Instructions: The above links will bring you to the APA’s page on Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology. Download the PDFs with the associated titles for an introduction to evidence-based practice and a discussion of its importance. Take note of the multiple sources of evidence discussed.
 
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