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PSYCH402: Neuropsychology

Unit 7: Cerebral Asymmetry   You may know that the brain is comprised of two hemispheres, the left and the right. You may not know that these two sides function independently of each other in certain ways. Though we are not fully aware of the reasons for this asymmetry, psychologists believe that an understanding of the laterallyspecific functions that each performs will further assist us in our quest to know how the brain controls certain behaviors. When we use the term “laterallyspecific,” we refer to those functions controlled by only one hemisphere. For example, we know that the left hemisphere fully controls the exercise of language. However, information generated by laterallyspecific functions is often shared with the other hemisphere. In fact, we frequently need the hemispheres to exchange laterallyspecific information in order to react appropriately. This unit will discuss these and other matters pertaining to the hemispheres and their respective functions.

Unit 7 Time Advisory
This unit will take you approximately 12 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 7.1: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 7.2: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 7.3: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 7.4: 3 hours

Unit7 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:
  - define the conceptual basis for cerebral asymmetry; - describe bilogical asymmetries at the anatomical and behavioral level; - describe the relationship between handedness and cerebral asymmetry; and - describe sex differences in cerebral asymmetry.

7.1 Anatomical Asymmetry   - Reading: Bryan Kolb and Ian Whishaw’s “Chapter 9: Principles of Cerebral Asymmetry” Link: Bryan Kolb and Ian Whishaw’s “Chapter 9: Principles of Cerebral Asymmetry (HTML)
 
Instructions: Use the link above to navigate to the webpage and then read the entire main text. NOTE: This resource applies to all of subsection 7.1.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

  • Reading: Eran Zaidel’s “Brain Asymmetry”  Link: Eran Zaidel’s “Brain Asymmetry (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Use the link above to navigate to the webpage. Near the top of the page, find the section titled “General Reading” and click the “Brain Asymmetry” link to open the Word document. We recommend that you save the document to your computer. Read from the start of the document through (and including) Section #3. NOTE: This resource applies to all of subsection 7.1.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

7.1.1 Cerebral Asymmetry   7.1.2 Neuronal Asymmetry   7.2 Behavioral Asymmetry   - Reading: Eran Zaidel’s “Brain Asymmetry” Link: Eran Zaidel’s “Brain Asymmetry (Microsoft Word)
 
Instructions: Click the link above, scroll down to click on the “Brain Asymmetry” link, and open the Word document. We recommend that you save the document to your computer. Read Section #4. NOTE: This resource applies to all of subsection 7.2.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

  • Reading: Bryan Kolb and Ian Whishaw’s “Chapter 9: Principles of Cerebral Asymmetry” Link: Bryan Kolb and IanWhishaw’s “Chapter 9: Principles of Cerebral Asymmetry (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Use the link above to navigate to the webpage and then read the entire main text. NOTE: This resource applies to all of subsection 7.2.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

7.2.1 The Visual System and Asymmetry   7.2.2 The Auditory System and Asymmetry   7.2.3 The Somatosensory System and Asymmetry   7.2.4 The Motor System and Asymmetry   7.2.5 Brain Function and Laterality   7.3 Handedness and Variations in Asymmetry   - Reading: Bryan Kolb and Ian Whishaw’s “Chapter 10: Variations in Cerebral Asymmetry” Link: Bryan Kolb and IanWhishaw’s “Chapter 10: Variations in Cerebral Asymmetry (HTML)
 
Instructions: Use the link above to navigate to the webpage and then read the entire main text. NOTE: This resource applies to all of subsection 7.3.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

  • Reading: Indiana University: M. K. Holder’s “What Does Handedness Have to Do with Brain Lateralization (and Who Cares?)” Link: Indiana University: M. K. Holder’s “What Does Handedness Have to do with Brain Lateralization  (and Who Cares?) (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Use the link above to navigate to the webpage and then read the entire main text. NOTE: This resource applies to all of subsection 7.3.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.
     

  • Reading: UCLA School of Medicine: Arthur W. Toga and Paul M. Thompson’s “Mapping Brain Asymmetry” Link: UCLA School of Medicine: Arthur W. Toga and Paul M. Thompson’s “Mapping Brain Asymmetry (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Click the link above and open the PDF document. We recommend that you save the document to your computer. Read the entire document. NOTE: This resource applies to all of subsection 7.3
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

7.3.1 Handedness:The Different Asymmetries Between Lefties and Righties   7.3.2 Theories of Hand Prevalence   7.3.3 Left-Handed Brain Organization   7.3.4 Cerebral Structures and Handedness   7.4 Sex Differences and Variations in Asymmetry   - Reading: UCLA School of Medicine: Arthur W. Toga and Paul M. Thompson’s “Mapping Brain Asymmetry” Link: UCLA School of Medicine: Arthur W. Toga and Paul M. Thompson’s “Mapping Brain Asymmetry (PDF)
 
Instructions: Click the link above and open the PDF document. We recommend that you save the document to your computer. Be sure to read the entire document. NOTE: This resource applies to all of subsection 7.4.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

  • Reading: Masters of Healthcare: Amber Hensley’s “10 Big Differences between Men’s and Women’s Brains” Link: Masters of Healthcare: Amber Hensley’s “10 Big Differences between Men’s and Women’s Brains (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Use the link above to navigate to the webpage and then read the entire main text. NOTE: This resource applies to subsections 7.4.1 through 7.4.3.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

7.4.1 Behavioral Asymmetry in Women vs. Men   7.4.2 Cerebral Organization in Women vs. Men   7.4.3 Brain Structures and Sex Differences   7.4.4 The Homosexual Brain: Hypothalamus Differences   - Reading: Dick F. Swaab’s “Sexual Orientation and its Basis in Brain Structure and Function” Link: Dick F. Swaab’s “Sexual Orientation and its Basis in Brain Structure and Function (HTML)
 
Instructions: Use the link above to navigate to the webpage and then read the entire main text.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.