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PSYCH402: Neuropsychology

Unit 6: The Motor System   Physical movement of any sort is a complex act requiring the seamless coordination of multiple body systems. Considering the millions of ways in which your body moves on a daily basis, the motor system may well be one of the most complex systems in the body. In this unit, we will study this system, exploring the ways it controls different movements and identifying the areas of the brain that participate in that process.

Unit 6 Time Advisory
This unit will take you approximately 12 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 6.1: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 6.2: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 6.3: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 6.4: 3 hours

Unit6 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:
  - describe the neural systems and structures involved in the initiation of movement; - describe the neural systems and structures involved in planning and coordinating sequences of movement; - describe the role of the brainstem structures in motor control; and - describe the pathways of communication between the CNS and peripheral motor systems via the spinal cord.

6.1 The Initiation of Movement   - Reading: Dartmouth Medical School: Dr. Rand Swenson’s “Review of Clinical and Functional Neuroscience: Chapter 8E” Link: Dartmouth Medical School: Dr. Rand Swenson’s “Review of Clinical and Functional Neuroscience: Chapter 8A (HTML)
 
Instructions: Use the link above to navigate to the webpage and then read the entire page. NOTE: This resource applies to all of section 6.1.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

6.1.1 The Posterior, Prefrontal, and Premotor Cortices   6.1.2 The Primary Motor Cortex   6.1.3 Electrical Stimulation of the Primary Motor Cortex   6.2 Movement Sequences   - Reading: John Hopkins University: James Knierim’s “Motor Units and Muscle Receptors”  Link: John Hopkins University: James Knierim’s “Motor Units and Muscle Receptors (HTML)
 
Instructions: Use the link above to navigate to the webpage and then read the entire main text. NOTE: This resource applies to all of subsection 6.2.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

  • Reading: John Hopkins University: James Knierim’s “Motor Cortex” Link: John Hopkins University: James Knierim’s “Motor Cortex (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Use the link above to navigate to the webpage and then read the entire main text. NOTE: This resource applies to all of section 6.2.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

6.2.1 Movement not Muscular Control   6.2.2 The Movement Lexicon   6.2.3 Movement Force and Direction: Motor-Cortex   6.2.4 Mirroring Movement: Mirror Neurons   6.2.5 The Prefrontal and Posterior Cortices: Direct Responses and Changes to Movement Due to Sensory Information   6.3 The Brainstem and Motor Control   - Reading: John Hopkins University: James Knierim’s “Basal Ganglia” Link: John Hopkins University: James Knierim’s “Basal Ganglia (HTML)
 
Instructions: Use the link above to navigate to the webpage and then read the entire main text. NOTE: This resource applies to all of section 6.3.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

6.3.1 The Basal Ganglia and Movement Force   6.3.2 Basal Ganglia Connections: Caudate, Globlus Pallidus, Thalamus, and Cortex   6.3.3 Motor Learning and the Cerebellum   - Reading: John Hopkins University: James Knierim’s “Cerebellum” Link: The John Hopkins University: James Knierim’s “Cerebellum (HTML)
 
Instructions: Use the link above to navigate to the webpage and then read the entire main text. NOTE: This resource applies to subsections 6.3.3 and 6.3.4.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

6.3.4 Movement Accuracy   6.4 Communicating with the Spinal Cord   - Reading: Dartmouth Medical School: Dr. Rand Swenson’s “Review of Clinical and Functional Neuroscience: Chapter 8A” Link: Dartmouth Medical School: Dr. Rand Swenson’s “Review of Clinical and Functional Neuroscience: Chapter 8A (HTML)
 
Instructions: Use the link above to navigate to the webpage and then read the entire page. NOTE: This resource applies to all of section 6.4.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

6.4.1 Corticospinal-Tract Pathway   6.4.2 Lateral vs. Ventral Corticospinal Pathway   6.4.3 Motor Neurons and their Connections   6.4.4 Contralateral Connections and Control