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PSYCH306: Sensation and Perception

Unit 7: Perceptual Development   In this final unit, we address one of the most interesting of all topics in sensation and perception; that is, how do these processes develop and change over our lifetime? It should be apparent that perception both requires sensory experience and that it changes as past perceptions influence how we respond to novel stimulation. The ultimate point is that sensation and perception are not static mechanisms; they are always in a state of dynamic flux, sometimes strengthening our awareness of the world around us and sometimes causing interference. Although these systems change over time, we are never more eager for stimulation, nor more sensitive to potential harm, than in the first years of life. Much of the research on perceptual development focuses on this critical period.

Unit 7 Time Advisory
This unit should take you 18.5 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 7.1: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 7.2: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 7.3: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 7.4: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 7.5: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 7.6: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 7.7: 2.5 hours

Unit7 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  • explain the major issues in the “nature versus nurture” controversy as it relates to perceptual development;
  • describe the major developmental issues associated with each of the five (5) primary sensory systems; and
  • explain the relationships between perceptual and cognitive development.

7.1 Some Context: Nature versus Nurture   - Reading: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read the introductory sections of chapter 15. NOTE: This document is in a continuous state of updating. Ignore the internal notes, such as “[need illustration here],” for example. Most of the referenced figures are included at the end of the document; it is okay if not all the figures are available.
 
Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • Reading: Colby College: M. E. Arterberry’s “Perceptual Development” Link: Colby College: M. E. Arterberry’s “Perceptual Development” (PDF)

    Instructions: Near the top right of the page, find the link “Perceptual Development” under the header “Browse Sample Content.” Read the introductory section.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage and document.

7.2 Visual Development   - Reading: Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute: Dr. R. D Hammer and Dr. Giuseppe Mirabella’s “What Can My Baby See?” Link: Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute: Dr. R. D Hammer and Dr. Giuseppe Mirabella’s “What Can My Baby See?” (HTML)

 Also available in:  
 [PDF](http://www.ski.org/Vision/babyvision.pdf)  

 Instructions: Click the link above and read the entire main text on
the web page. To view in PDF format, select the appropriate link
below the article title.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
included on the above webpage and document.
  • Web Media: YouTube: Peter Vishton's “Development of Infant Visual Tracking. Activity 1” from “What Babies Can Do: An Activity-Based Guide to Infant Development” Link: YouTube: Peter Vishton's “Development of Infant Visual Tracking. Activity 1 (YouTube) from “What Babies Can Do: An Activity-Based Guide to Infant Development” 
     
    Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to YouTube and start the video. 

    Watching this video should take approximately 7 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

  • Web Media: YouTube: BBC’s “Baby Synapse Connection” Link: YouTube: BBC’s “Baby Synapse Connection” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to YouTube and start the video. 

    Watching this video should take approximately 5 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

  • Reading: University of North Carolina-Greensboro: R. Proctor and M. Compton’s “Perceptual Development”  Link: University of North Carolina–Greensboro: R. Proctor and M. Compton’s “Perceptual Development” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Click the link above to open the PDF document called “Perceptual Development.” Read section III, “Visual Development.” NOTE: This is a training document for professionals serving families of children with perceptual difficulties. Ignore the self-report and testing aspects of this document.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage and document.

  • Reading: Colby College: M. E. Arterberry’s “Perceptual Development” Link: Colby College: M. E. Arterberry’s “Perceptual Development” (PDF)

    Instructions: Near the top right of the page, find the link “Perceptual Development” under the header “Browse Sample Content.” Read the entire document.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage and document.

7.3 Auditory Development   - Reading: University of North Carolina–Greensboro: R. Proctor and M. Compton’s “Perceptual Development”  Link: University of North Carolina–Greensboro: R. Proctor and M. Compton’s “Perceptual Development” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to open the PDF document called “Perceptual Development.” Read section II, “Auditory Development.” NOTE: This is a training document for professionals serving families of children with perceptual difficulties. Ignore the self-report and testing aspects of this document.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage and document.

7.4 Development of Touch   - Reading: University of North Carolina–Greensboro: R. Proctor and M. Compton’s “Perceptual Development”  Link: University of North Carolina–Greensboro: R. Proctor and M. Compton’s “Perceptual Development” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to open the PDF document called “Perceptual Development.” Read section IV, “Touch.” NOTE: This is a training document for professionals serving families of children with perceptual difficulties. Ignore the self-report and testing aspects of this document.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage and document.

7.5 Other Senses   - Reading: Mercer County Community College: Professor Heather Jennings’ “Perceptual Development” Link: Mercer County Community College: Professor Heather Jennings’ “Perceptual Development” (PowerPoint)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to open the PowerPoint presentation called “Perceptual Development.” Although the entire presentation is relevant to section 7 of this course, you should pay special attention to slides #5 through #11.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage and document.

7.6 The Important Relationship Between Perceptual and Cognitive Development   - Reading: Livestrong.com’s “Early Childhood Perceptual Development” Link: Livestrong.com’s “Early Childhood Perceptual Development” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to the web page and read the main text.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

7.7 Later Life   - Reading: Answers.com’s “Ageing: Sensory and Perceptual Changes” Link: Answers.com’s “Ageing: Sensory and Perceptual Changes” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to the web page and read the main text.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.