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PSYCH306: Sensation and Perception

Unit 5: The Auditory System   We will now turn to the auditory system. We will begin by discussing the complexity of the sound stimulus, noting that sound comes in many forms (think of music, speech, and other complex sounds), all of which our brains are capable of understanding. You will learn the properties of sound, and discover how these properties relate to what we hear. We will also review the biology of the ear, identifying different pathways of the brain that enable us to hear.

Unit 5 Time Advisory
This unit should take you 17 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 5.1: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 5.2: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 5.3: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 5.4: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 5.5: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 5.6: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 5.7: 2 hours

Unit5 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  • explain the basic properties of the auditory stimulus (sound);
  • explain the important auditory sensory structures and their function(s);
  • explain the fundamental aspects of the perception of loudness;
  • explain the fundamental aspects of the perception of pitch;
  • explain the fundamental aspects of the perception of the location of sound sources; and
  • describe the basic auditory sensory pathways in the central nervous system.

5.1 Properties of Sound   - Reading: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read pages 10.2 to 10.5. NOTE: This document is in a continuous state of updating. Please ignore the internal notes, such as “[need illustration here]," for example. Most of the referenced figures are included at the end of the document; it is okay if not all the figures are available. ADDITIONAL NOTE: This reading applies to all subsections of section 5.1.
 
Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

5.1.1 Sound as a Physical Stimulus   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.1 also covers this subunit.

  • Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 10.x, Sound Basics” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 10.x, Sound Basics” (JAVA)
     
    Instructions: Click the link above or the link on page #2 of the “Chapter 10” PDF document for the embedded activity called “Interactive Illustration 10.x, Sound Basics.” If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that gives you control over the physical qualities of a sound. Follow the directions on pages #2 and #3 of the PDF document to manipulate the variables and hear the results. NOTE: This assignment applies to subsections 5.1.1-5.1.6.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

5.1.2 Amplitude   Note: The readings assigned beneathsubunits 5.1and 5.1.1 also cover this subunit. It is important to understand the difference between measuring perceptions and measuring actual physical attributes. What perceptual experience is dependent on the amplitude of a sound wave?

5.1.3 Frequency   Note: The readings assigned beneath subunits 5.1 and 5.1.1 also cover this subunit. What perceptual experience is dependent on the frequency of a sound wave?

5.1.4 Loudness and Amplitude   Note: The readings assigned beneath subunits 5.1 and 5.1.1 also cover this subunit. Be sure to consider if there is truly a one-to-one relationship between amplitude and the perceptual experience called loudness.

5.1.5 Pitch and Frequency   Note: The readings assigned beneath subunits 5.1 and 5.1.1 also cover this subunit. Be sure to consider if there is truly a one-to-one relationship between frequency and the perceptual experience called pitch.

5.1.6 Phase   Note: The readings assigned beneath subunits 5.1 and 5.1.1 also cover this subunit.

  • Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 10.x, Phase and Cancellation” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 10.x, Phase and Cancellation” (JAVA)
     
    Instructions: Click the link above or the link on page #4 of the “Chapter 10” PDF document for the embedded activity called “Interactive Illustration 10.x, Phase and Cancellation.” If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that gives you control over the phase relationship between two sounds. Follow the directions on pages #4 and #5 of the PDF document to hear the difference between being in and out of phase.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

5.1.7 Timbre   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.1 also covers this subunit.

  • Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 10.x, Timbre” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 10.x, Timbre” (JAVA)
     
    Instructions: Click the link above or the link on page #5 of the “Chapter 10” PDF document for the embedded activity called “Interactive Illustration 10.x, Timbre.” If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that gives you control over timbre of a sound. Follow the directions on page #5 of the PDF document to hear the effects of adding or subtracting harmonics.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

5.1.8 The Human Ear: The Outer Ear   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.1 also covers this subunit.

  • Interactive Lab: Pearson Education’s “LIVE!Psych: Virtual Tour of the Human Ear” Link: Pearson Education’s “LIVE!Psych: Virtual Tour of the Human Ear” (Shockwave)
     
    Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to the web page. The animation has three (3) parts. On the first page, listen to the directions and then roll your mouse over each labeled structure to see a description. When you are finished, click the right-pointing triangle at the lower right to move to screen 2 of 3, and watch the animation. When you are finished, click the right-pointing triangle at the lower right again to move to the final screen (3 of 3), and watch the animation. NOTE: This web media applies to all subsections of section 5.1.8-5.1.11.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above document and webpage.

  • Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Fundamentals of Audition” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Fundamentals of Audition: Illustration 10.x The Ear” (JAVA)
     
    Instructions: If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that gives you a schematic view of the working of the ear. Start the sound with the button at the bottom of the screen (the sound does not actually play through your speakers in this demonstration), and then watch the changes as you use the Frequency slider to change the frequency. To zero in on a specific part of the ear, choose from the drop-down menu at the top of the screen. NOTE: This assignment applies to all subsections of section 5.1.8-5.1.11.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

5.1.9 Pinna   Note: The readings assigned beneath subunits 5.1 and 5.1.8 also cover this subunit. What would happen if we lost an ear? Be sure you understand the important role of the pinna in the perception of sound.

5.1.10 The Auditory Canal   Note: The readings assigned beneath subunits 5.1 and 5.1.8 also cover this subunit. Why do you think there are so many raw nerve endings in our auditory canals? Do you think it is important for us to know when something is in our ear?

5.1.11 The Tympanic Membrane (The Eardrum)   Note: The readings assigned beneath subunits 5.1 and 5.1.8 also cover this subunit. As you read this section, consider what might happen if the eardrum became thick and scarred by repeated ear infections over time.

5.2 The Human Ear: The Middle Ear   - Interactive Lab: Pearson Education’s “LIVE!Psych: Virtual Tour of the Human Ear” Link: Pearson Education’s “LIVE!Psych: Virtual Tour of the Human Ear” (Shockwave)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to the web page. The animation has three (3) parts. On the first page, listen to the directions and then roll your mouse over each labeled structure to see a description. When you are finished, click the right-pointing triangle at the lower right to move to screen 2 of 3, and watch the animation. When you are finished, click the right-pointing triangle at the lower right again to move to the final screen (3 of 3), and watch the animation. NOTE: This web media applies to all subsections of section 5.2.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above document and webpage.

  • Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Fundamentals of Audition” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Fundamentals of Audition” (JAVA)
     
    Instructions: If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that gives you a schematic view of the working of the ear. Start the sound with the button at the bottom of the screen (the sound does not actually play through your speakers in this demonstration), and then watch the changes as you use the Frequency slider to change the frequency. To zero in on a specific part of the ear, choose from the drop-down menu at the top of the screen. NOTE: This assignment applies to all subsections of section 5.2.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

5.2.1 The Ossicles: Malleus, Incus and Stapes   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.2 covers this subunit. These smallest bones in the body are truly a miracle of evolution. Be sure you understand how the geometry of their arrangement helps focus the movement of the eardrum onto the oval window.

5.2.2 Ossicles and Vibrations   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.2 covers this subunit. Consider the effect of the incorrect operation of the ossicles. Many people have scar tissue in their middle ears from repeated infections. How might this affect the vibration of these structures?

5.2.3 How the Ossicles Amplify Sound   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.2 also covers this subunit.

  • Reading: Tom Harris’ “How Hearing Works” Link: Tom Harris’ “How Hearing Works” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to the web page and read the main text.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage and document.

5.3 The Human Ear: The Inner Ear   5.3.1 The Cochlea: Scala Tympany, Scala Vestibuli and Cochlear Partition   - Reading: Georgia State University’s “HyperPhysics: The Cochlea” Link: Georgia State University’s “HyperPhysics: The Cochlea” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to the web page and read the main text.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage and document.

5.3.2 The Organ of Corti   - Reading: Georgia State University’s “HyperPhysics: The Organ of Corti” Link: Georgia State University’s “HyperPhysics: The Organ of Corti” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to the web page and read the main text. NOTE: This reading applies to subsections 5.3.2-5.3.3.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage and document.

5.3.3 Hair Cells: Inner vs. Outer   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.3.2 also covers this subunit.

  • Web Media: University of Pennsylvania Health System’s Medical Animation Library’s “Hearing and the cochlea” Link: University of Pennsylvania Health System’s Medical Animation Library’s “Hearing and the cochlea” (HTML and Quicktime)
     
    Instructions: Click the link above to watch the animation.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage and document.

5.3.4 Auditory Transduction   - Web Media: Sumanas, Inc.’s “Sound Transduction” Link: Sumanas, Inc.’s “Sound Transduction” (Adobe Flash)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to the web page. Choose the “Narrated” or “Step-Through” link to view the animation. Although the first parts of the animation are redundant to other subunits, be sure to watch this flash video in its entirety.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above document and webpage.

5.3.5 Higher Order Auditory Structures   - Reading: Georgia State University’s “HyperPhysics: The Auditory Nerve” Link: Georgia State University’s “HyperPhysics: The Auditory Nerve” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to the web page and read the text for all sections. NOTE: This reading applies to subsections 5.3.5-5.3.6
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage and document.

5.3.6 Cortical Auditory Pathways   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.3.5 covers this subunit. Be sure you have a good understanding of the basic pathway for carrying auditory signals from the inner ear to the cortex of the brain.

5.4 Pitch Perception   5.4.1 Traveling Wave   - Web Media: The Rockefeller University’s Laboratory of Sensory Neuroscience’s “Cochlear Travelling Wave” Link: The Rockefeller University’s Laboratory of Sensory Neuroscience’s “Cochlear Travelling Wave” (HTML and Quicktime)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to the web page and watch the animation. NOTE: This reading applies subsections 5.4.1-5.4.2.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above document and webpage.

5.4.2 The Base vs. the Apex of the Basilar Membrane   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.4 also covers this subunit. Why do you think sound has different effects on different parts of the basilar membrane? Focus on this question as you view and listen to the demonstration.

5.4.3 Tonotopic Map   - Web Media: YouTube: Brandon Pletsch’s “Auditory Transduction” Link: YouTube: Brandon Pletsch’s “Auditory Transduction (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch the video. 

 Watching this video should take approximately 8 minutes.  
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
included on the above document and webpage.

5.4.4 Frequency Tuning   - Reading: Stanford University: Professor Lera Boroditsky’s “Hearing I: Lecture Notes” Link: Stanford University: Professor Lera Boroditsky’s “Hearing I: Lecture Notes” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to the web page and read the entire page. Do not be concerned if some of the links to figures and illustrations do not work. NOTE: This reading applies to subsections of 5.4.4-4.4.7.
 
Terms of Use: The material has been hosted with the kind permission of Professor Lera Boroditsky.

5.4.5 Timing Code for Pitch: The Cochlear Microphonic   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.4.4 covers this subunit. Be sure to have a good understanding about why the frequency of action potentials is not sufficient to signal the pitch of a sound wave.

5.4.6 Phase Locking   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.4.4 covers this subunit. How does phase locking solve the problem if signaling the pitch of a sound?

5.4.7 The Periodicity of Pitch   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.4.4 covers this subunit. Make sure you are very clear about the effect of the missing fundamental.

5.4.8 Masking Critical Bands and the Missing Fundamental   - Reading: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read from page 11.2 to “Music” on page 11.11. NOTE: This document is in a continuous state of updating. Ignore the internal notes, such as “[need illustration here],” for example. Most of the referenced figures are included at the end of the document; it is okay if not all the figures are available.
 
Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Tone Masking” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Tone Masking” (JAVA)
     
    Instructions: If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that illustrates the concept of the missing fundamental. Follow the directions on page #4 of the PDF document to manipulate the demonstration.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Masking and Critical Bands” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Masking and Critical Bands” (JAVA)
     
    Instructions: If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that illustrates the concept of the missing fundamental. Follow the directions on pages #6 to #8 of the PDF document to manipulate the demonstration.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Missing Fundamental Experiment” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Missing Fundamental Experiment” (JAVA)
     
    Instructions: If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that illustrates the concept of the missing fundamental. Follow the directions on pages #9 and #10 of the PDF document to manipulate the demonstration.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

5.5 Loudness   - Reading: Stanford University: Professor Lera Boroditsky’s “Hearing II: Lecture Notes” Link: Stanford University: Professor Lera Boroditsky’s “Hearing II: Lecture Notes” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to the web page and read “Section 1: Loudness.” Do not be concerned if some of the links to figures and illustrations do not work. NOTE: This reading applies to all subsections of section 5.5.
 
Terms of Use: The material has been hosted with the kind permission of Professor Lera Boroditsky.

5.5.1 Firing Rate Hypothesis   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.5 covers this subunit. In some ways, the idea of neural firing rate as a perceptual signal is an issue for the perception of both pitch and loudness. Make sure that you understand how it relates to both pitch and loudness perception.

5.5.2 Number of Neuron Hypothesis   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.5 covers this subunit. If firing rate doesnt do the job of signaling loudness, should we perhaps look to the raw number of neurons that are stimulated?

5.5.3 Critical Bands and Band-Limited Noise   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.5 covers this subunit. As you read this section, think about why we refer to band-limited auditory stimuli as noise.

5.5.4 The Zwicker Loudness Matching Experiments   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.5 covers this subunit. According to Zwicker, what is the relationship between loudness and the total energy stimulating the basilar membrane?

5.5.5 Neural Code for Pitch and Loudness   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.5 covers this subunit. This reading summarizes how we think pitch and loudness perception actually work. It is critically important to understand the mechanisms of each.

5.5.6 Adaptation and Damage   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.5 covers this subunit. As you read this section, are you aware of the sound of the air conditioning or heating fan in the room? Does the computer you are using make any kind of hum? What does it mean if ambient sounds that we are unaware of go unnoticed until we pay attention to them?

5.6 Auditory Space Perception   - Reading: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read from “Auditory Space Perception” on page 11.13 to “Speech” on page 11.19. NOTE: This document is in a continuous state of updating. Ignore the internal notes, such as “[need illustration here],” for example. Most of the referenced figures are included at the end of the document; it is okay if not all the figures are available. ADDITIONAL NOTE: This reading applies to all subsections of section 5.6.
 
Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

5.6.1 Monaural Cues   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.6 covers this subunit. One of the reasons we have more than one ear is to enrich our ability to perceive sound in space. It helps us localize sounds, for example. Is it possible to receive cues about things like sound localization with only one ear?

5.6.2 Binaural Cues   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.6 also covers this subunit.

  • Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Binaural Cues for Direction” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Binaural Cues for Direction” (JAVA)
     
    Instructions: If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that illustrates binaural directional cueing. Follow the directions on page #16 of the PDF document to manipulate the demonstration. NOTE: We recommended that you use headphones for the best experience of this effect.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

5.6.3 Interaural Phase Difference   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.6 also covers this subunit.

  • Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Head in Sound Space” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Head in Sound Space” (JAVA)
     
    Instructions: If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that illustrates the way sound arrives at each ear at a slightly different time. Follow the directions on page #14 of the PDF document to manipulate the demonstration.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Time of Arrival and Phase” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Time of Arrival and Phase” (JAVA)
     
    Instructions: If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that illustrates phase differences between the two ears. Follow the directions on pages #14, #15, and #16 of the PDF document to manipulate the demonstration. NOTE: We recommended that you use headphones for the best experience of this effect.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

5.6.4 The Complexities of Two Ears: Precedence Effect   Note: The reading assigned beneath subunit 5.6 also covers this subunit.

  • Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, The Precedence Effect” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, The Precedence Effect” (JAVA)
     
    Instructions: If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that illustrates the precedence effect. Follow the directions on page #19 of the PDF document to manipulate the demonstration.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

5.7 Complex Auditory Phenomena   5.7.1 The Perception of Tone   - Reading: Internet Psychology Lab’s “Tone Perception” Link: Internet Psychology Lab’s “Tone Perception” (JAVA and HTML)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to the main page. Read each subsequent page, using the “Next” text link to move through the eight (8) pages. You must have previously installed the JAVA plug-in described on page #2 of this document.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

5.7.2 Auditory Scene Analysis   - Reading: University of Sussex: Professor Chris Darwin’s “Hearing Lecture Notes: Auditory Scene Analysis” Link: University of Sussex: Professor Chris Darwin’s “Hearing Lecture Notes: Auditory Scene Analysis” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click the link above to navigate to the main page and read “Music Perception.”
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use included on the above webpage.

5.7.3 Music   - Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, The Musical Scale” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, The Musical Scale” (JAVA)
 
Instructions: If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that illustrates the attributes of the musical scale. Follow the directions on page #11 of the PDF document to manipulate the demonstration.
 
Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Gestalt Laws of Proximity and Similarity” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Gestalt Laws of Proximity and Similarity” (JAVA)
     
    Instructions: If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that illustrates some Gestalt principles. Follow the directions on pages #12 and #13 of the PDF document to manipulate the demonstration.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

  • Assignment: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Gestalt Law of Good Continuation” Link: Hanover College: Professor John Krantz’s “Experiencing Sensation and Perception: Interactive Illustration 11.x, Gestalt Law of Good Continuation” (JAVA)
     
    Instructions: If you have installed the JAVA plug-in (see page #2 of this course), clicking the embedded link will open a page that illustrates some Gestalt principles. Follow the directions on pages #12 and #13 of the PDF document to manipulate the demonstration.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of John Krantz, and can be viewed in its original form here. Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.