Loading...

PSYCH301: Social Psychology

Unit 2: The Self and Person Perception   This unit will focus on two areas of social psychology that may seem somewhat out of place in a class about groups, cultures, and societies: the self and its perception of others. You may be wondering how units on the individual self fit into this course. Well, when we talk about social situations from a psychological point of view, there are two components of any interaction. The first part, which relates to the self, is the way we view ourselves and our beliefs. Our concept of our own being is important to understanding how we act in social situations. The second component of any interaction involves how we perceive and form opinions or ideas about people around us. This may be more obvious in how it relates to our interaction in social situations, as our opinions about people may change the way in which we interact with them. Understanding how we view ourselves and how we view other people is essential in being able to comprehend how humans behave in social situations.

Unit 2 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take you approximately approximately 13.75 hours.
☐    Introduction: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 2.1: 1.75 hours

☐    Subunit 2.2: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 2.3: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 2.4: 5 hours

☐    Reading: 4 hours

☐    Lectures: 1 hour

Unit2 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
- define the notion of the “self” in social psychological terms; and - explain how the notion of the “self” contributes to cognitive processes in social interaction (i.e., social cognitions and attributional processes).

  • Lecture: University of Idaho: Professor Traci Craig’s “Nature of the Self and Introspection” and “Self-Perception Theory” Link: University of Idaho: Professor Traci Craig’s “Nature of the Self and Introspection” (RealAudio) and “Self-Perception Theory” (RealAudio)
     
    Also available in:
    Transcript (HTML) “Nature of the Self and Introspection”
    Transcript (HTML) “Self-Perception Theory”
     
    Instructions: Note these lectures will cover subunits 2.1-2.4. Click on the hyperlinks titled Audio and Slides, which are at the bottom of the To-Do List box on the right-hand side of the webpages. Listen to the lectures in conjunction with reading the PowerPoint slides. Real Player software is required for the audio files.
     
    These lectures are from Professor Traci Craig’s Social Psychology course at University of Idaho. Although not all of the lectured material is covered in this unit, the material presented is pertinent to the topic of the self in social psychology. 
     
    Listening to these lectures and reading the slides should take you approximately 2 hours.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.1 Introduction to the Concept of “The Self”   - Lecture: Massachusetts Institute of Technology OpenCourseWare: Professor Jeremy Wolfe’s Introduction to Psychology: “Lecture 16: Who Are You? The Psychology of the Self” Link: Massachusetts Institute of Technology OpenCourseWare: Professor Jeremy Wolfe’s Introduction to Psychology“Lecture 16: Who Are You? The Psychology of the Self” (Flash)

 Instructions: Listen to this audio lecture. There is a break in the
lecture from the 55-minute mark to the 61-minute mark; you can skip
over this portion. Make sure to click on the Related Resourcestab,
and select the PDF link to download the accompanying lecture notes.
These lecture notes provide an overview of the audio lecture
content. It presents some of the key findings/concepts in the
psychological study of the self, including aspects of personal
identity, the neuropsychology of the self, and the self-related
psychopathologies. This material covers the topics outlined in
subunits 2.1.1 and 2.1.2.  

 Listening to this lecture and reading the associated lecture notes
should take you approximately 1 hour and 45 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: This video is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/).

2.1.1 What is the Self?   Note: This topic is covered by the lecture assigned below subunit 2.1.

2.2 Self Knowledge   2.2.1 The History of the Self   Note: This topic is covered by the lectures assigned below the unit introduction and subunit 2.1.

2.2.2 Effects of Public and Private Self-Awareness   Note: This topic is covered by the lectures assigned below the unit introduction and subunit 2.1.

2.2.3 Self-Regulation   Note: This topic is covered by the lectures assigned below the unit introduction and subunit 2.1.

2.2.4 Self-Schemas and Gender Schemas   Note: This topic is covered by the lectures assigned below the unit introduction and subunit 2.1.

2.2.5 Cultural Contributions   Note: This topic is covered by the lectures assigned below the unit introduction and subunit 2.1.

2.2.6 Self-Esteem, Self-Complexity, and Self-Discrepancy   - Reading: University of Iowa’s Current Research in Social Psychology: Dr. Scott T. Allison, et al.’s “Self-Serving Outcome-Biases in Trait Judgments about the Self” Link: University of Iowa’s Current Research in Social Psychology: Dr. Scott T. Allison, et al.’s “Self-Serving Outcome-Biases in Trait Judgments about the Self” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Scroll down and click on the hyperlink titled Volume 11, No. 14. Read this empirical journal article as advised by the texts presented in subunit 1.2.
 
Reading this article should take you approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: University of Iowa’s Current Research in Social Psychology: Dr. J.W. Lucas’s and Dr. M.J. Lovaglia’s “Self-Handicapping: Gender, Race, and Status” Link: University of Iowa’s Current Research in Social Psychology: Dr. J.W. Lucas’s and Dr. M.J. Lovaglia’s “Self-Handicapping: Gender, Race, and Status” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this empirical journal article as advised by the texts presented in subunit 1.2. This article will help highlight the current social psychological research in this area of study. 
     
    Reading this article should take you approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.3 Social Cognition   - Lecture: University of Idaho: Professor Traci Craig’s “Low-Effort Thinking: Understanding Schemas” and “Nonverbal Behavior” Link: University of Idaho: Professor Traci Craig’s “Low-Effort Thinking: Understanding Schemas” (RealAudio) and “Nonverbal Behavior” (RealAudio)
 
Also available in:
Transcript (HTML) “Low-Effort Thinking: Understanding Schemas”
Transcript (HTML)“Nonverbal Behavior”

 Instructions: Note that this material covers concepts outlined in
subunits 2.3.1-2.3.5. Click on the hyperlinks titled *Audio* and
*Slides*, which are at the bottom of the *To-Do List box* on the
right-hand side of the webpages. Listen to the lecture in
conjunction with reading the PowerPoint slides. Real Player software
is required for the audio files.  
    
 Listening to these lecture and reading the slides should take you
approximately 2 hours.  
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.3.1 Low-Effort Thinking   Note: This topic is covered by the lectures assigned below subunit 2.3.

2.3.2 Guiding Schemas and Association   Note: This topic is covered by the lectures assigned below subunit 2.3.

2.3.3 Chronic Accessibility of Schemas   Note: This topic is covered by the lectures assigned below subunit 2.3.

2.3.4 Components of Impression Formation   Note: This topic is covered by the lectures assigned below subunit 2.3.

2.3.5 Physical Information and Nonverbal Behavior   Note: This topic is covered by the lectures assigned below subunit 2.3.

2.4 Attributional Processes   - Reading: Iowa State University: Dr. Debora Bell-Dolan and Dr. Craig A. Anderson’s “Attributional Processes: An Integration of Social and Clinical Psychology” Link: Iowa State University: Dr. Debora Bell-Dolan and Dr. Craig A. Anderson’s “Attributional Processes: An Integration of Social and Clinical Psychology” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Note that this reading will cover the topics outlined in subunits 2.6.1-2.6.5. For the first reading, scroll down and click on the file titled 99B-DA.pdf. Read this empirical journal article as advised by the readings presented previously in subunit 1.2.
 
Reading this article should take you approximately 2 hours.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: University of Iowa: Dr. Jerry I. Shaw and Dr. W. Neil Steers’s Current Research in Social Psychology: “Gathering Information to Form an Impression: Attribution Categories and Information Valence” Link: University of Iowa: Dr. Jerry I. Shaw and Dr. W. Neil Steers’s Current Research in Social Psychology: “Gathering Information to Form an Impression: Attribution Categories and Information Valence” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Note that this reading will cover the topics outlined in subunits 2.6.1-2.6.5. For this second reading, click on the above link, and read the empirical journal article as advised by the readings presented earlier in subunit 1.2.
     
    Reading this article should take you approximately 2 hours.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Lecture: University of Idaho: Professor Traci Craig’s “Causal Attributions” Link: University of Idaho: Professor Traci Craig’s “Causal Attributions” (RealAudio)

    Also available in:
    Transcript (HTML)

    Instructions: Click on the hyperlinks to the audio lecture and PowerPoint slides, which are located at the bottom of the To-Do List box on the right side of the webpage. Listen to this short lecture, while you simultaneously view the PowerPoint slides. 

    Listening to the lecture and reading the slides should take you approximately 1 hour.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.4.1 Attributions Defined   Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 2.4.

2.4.2 Automatic versus Controlled Processes   Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 2.4.

2.4.3 Motivational Influences of Attributions   Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 2.4.

2.4.4 Short-Term Consequences of Attributions   Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 2.4.

2.4.5 Long-Term Consequences of Attributions: Clinical Implications   Note: This topic is covered by the reading assigned below subunit 2.4.

Unit 2 Assessment   - Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 2 Assessment” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 2 Assessment”

 Instructions: Complete this assessment to check your understanding
of the material covered in this unit. You will see the correct
answers after you hit the “Submit” button.</span>