Loading...

PSYCH301: Social Psychology

Unit 1: Introduction to the Study of Social Psychology   Social Psychology has a rich history of experimental research that aims to study persons and their relationships with others, groups, and society as a whole. In this unit, you will be introduced to several diverse areas of research, which encompass this broad field of study. Then, you will learn more about experimentation, the backbone of social psychological research. Finally, you will be provided with a brief tutorial on how to read social psychological research, as a majority of your readings are grounded in peer-reviewed journal articles.

Unit 1 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take you approximately 6.75 hours.

☐    Subunit 1.1: 4.25 hours

☐    Subunit 1.2: 2.5 hours

Unit1 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
- identify the specific areas of research interest within the field of social psychology; - describe the differences between sociological and psychology perspectives on social psychology; and - discuss experiments and other empirical research in the field of social psychology.

1.1 What Is Social Psychology?   1.1.1 Sociological and Psychological Contributions to Social Psychology   - Lecture: YouTube: University of California, Berkeley: Professor Robb Willer’s “Lecture 1: Introduction to Social Psychology” Link: YouTube: University of California, Berkeley: Professor Robb Willer’s “Lecture 1: Introduction to Social Psychology” (YouTube)
 
Also available in:
iTunes U
 
Instructions: Watch this lecture.
 
Watching this lecture and pausing to take notes should take you approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes.
 
Terms of Use: This video is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative 3.0 License.  It is attributed to Robb Willer and the University of California, Berkeley, and the original version can be found here.

  • Reading: The Society for Personality and Social Psychology’s “What is Social/Personality Psychology?” Link: The Society for Personality and Social Psychology’s “What is Social/Personality Psychology?” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this webpage to find out more information about the definition of social/personality psychology, the science of social/personality psychology, and how to become a social or personality psychologist.
     
    Reading this webpage should take you approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.1.2 Diverse Topics in Social Psychology   - Reading: San Bernardino Community College: Professor T.L. Brink’s Psychology: A Student Friendly Approach: “Unit 13: Social Psychology” Link: San Bernardino Community College: Professor T.L. Brink’s Psychology: A Student Friendly Approach“Unit 13: Social Psychology” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read this unit, which provides an overview of important concepts in social psychology. You may remember social psychology from your introduction to psychology course. Feel free to skim this chapter if you recall the content. 
 
Note on the Text: As social psychology covers a diverse set of topics, this chapter will serve as a primer to introduce you to the main topics in social psychology.

 Reading this unit should take you approximately 1 hour and 30
minutes.  

 Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the
kind permission of T.L. Brink from Crafton Hills College. Note that
this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any
capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.
  • Reading: The Social Psychology Network’s “Social Psychology Links By Subtopic” Link: The Social Psychology Network’s “Social Psychology Links By Subtopic” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Scroll down this page to review the variety of subtopics associated with Social Psychology. Click on any link of particular interest in order to view additional resources, publications, and studies in that area. Note that this website also maintains links to the latest reports of psychology in the news and to the professional profiles of hundreds of social psychologists around the world.
     
    Reading this webpage should take you approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: The Saylor Foundation’s “What Grabs People’s Attention?” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “What Grabs People’s Attention?” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: For this activity, you should first read and reflect on the list of scenarios below. Each scenario describes a situation where an individual behaves in a manner that seems to grab people’s attention. Then, write out your answers to the open-ended questions. There are no correct or incorrect answers for this activity. Rather, the activity is designed to help you start thinking about human social behavior at a deeper level.
     
    Considering these scenarios and writing out thoughtful responses to the open-ended questions should take you approximately 30 minutes.

1.2 Researching Empirical Journal Articles   1.2.1 Reading Empirical Articles   - Reading: Research Methods Knowledge Base: William M. K. Trochim’s “Key Elements of a Journal Article” Link: Research Methods Knowledge Base: William M. K. Trochim’s “Key Elements of a Journal Article” (HTML)
 
Instruction: This webpage provides you with an overview of the anatomy of a journal article and provide recommendations for how to read empirical journal articles at an undergraduate level.
 
Reading this webpage should take you approximately 15 minutes.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: Muhlenberg College’s Find, Read, and Cite Psychology Articles: “Reading Articles” Link: Muhlenberg College’s Find, Read, and Cite Psychology Articles“Reading Articles” (HTML)
     
    Instruction: Read the section below the heading Reading Articles. Reading this section will provide you with an overview of the anatomy of a journal article and provide recommendations for how to read empirical journal articles at an undergraduate level.
     
    Reading this section should take you approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.2 Experimental Research in Social Psychology   - Lecture: YouTube: University of California, Berkley: Professor Robb Willer’s “Lecture 2: Experiments” Link: YouTube: University of California, Berkley: Professor Robb Willer’s “Lecture 2: Experiments” (YouTube)
 
Also available in:
iTunes U
 
Instructions: Start the video at the 2-minute mark, as the first part of the lecture deals with administrative details of the class. There is also a class break from the 43-minute mark to the 48-minute mark that you can fast-forward through.
 
Watching this video lecture and pausing to take notes should take you approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
 
Terms of Use: This video is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative 3.0 License.  It is attributed to Robb Willer and the University of California, Berkley, and the original version can be found here.

  • Activity: Principles of Social Psychology: “Table 1.1 Is Social Psychology Just Common Sense?” Link: Principles of Social Psychology: “Table 1.1 Is Social Psychology Just Common Sense?” (PDF)

    Instructions: People often think that research in psychology is all just common sense, but sometimes the results are surprising. Find out more about some of the topics that people think are common sense by taking a short true/false assessment and then checking your answers against the answer key. To take the assessment, scroll down to Table 1.1, on pages 31-32. Record your answers to the 8-question true/false quiz. After, scroll down to Table 1.5, on page 55-56, to go to the Chapter Summary page where you can check how well you scored and read more about the research supporting the correct answers. By doing this exercise, you should gain a better understanding of the importance of conducting scientific research, even if the focus of a study seems to be a simple matter of common sense.
     
    Reading the introduction, completing the quiz, and studying the correct answers should take you approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

Unit 1 Assessment   - Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 1 Assessment” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 1 Assessment”

 Instructions: Complete this assessment to check your understanding
of the material covered in this unit. You will see the correct
answers after you hit the “Submit” button.</span>