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PSYCH206: Cognitive Psychology

Unit 2: Social Cognition, Motivation, and Emotion   The last unit focused on the philosophical and historical roots of cognitive psychology.  This next unit builds on this knowledge through detailing a more modern perspective on cognitive psychology, which has been influenced by cognitive neuropsychology.  This perspective draws on the knowledge gleaned from neuroscience, a fast advancing field which provides insight into how information is processed in the brain.  First, you will be provided with a more modern definition of cognitive psychology, which is based on the information processing approach. Second, you will read about the methods, as well as associated definitions and concepts, utilized in the field of cognitive neuropsychology.  Your final readings will help you understand several areas of research which are of interest to cognitive neuropsychologists, including social cognitions, motivations, and emotions.  

Unit 2 Time Advisory
This unit will take you approximately 9 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 2.1: 4 hours

☐    Subunit 2.2: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 2.3: 3 hours

Unit2 Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  • Define cognitive psychology as it is currently conceived.
  • Identify and describe the methods, main terms, and concepts used in cognitive neuropsychology.
  • Describe the main findings in the following primary areas of scientific research within cognitive neuropsychology: social cognitions, motivations, and emotions.

2.1 Introduction to Cognitive Neuropsychology   - Reading: Wikibook’s Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience: “Cognitive Psychology and the Brain” and ZainBooks’s Cognitive Psychology: “Cognitive Psychology” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

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2.1.1 Cognitive Psychology Defined   2.1.2 Information Processing Approach   2.1.3 Cognitive Neuropsychology Methods   - Reading: Wikibook’s Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience: “Behavioural and Neuroscience Methods” Link: Wikibook’s Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience: “Behavioural and Neuroscience Methods” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Please click on the above link and read the entirety of the chapter.
 
Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  You can find the original Wikibooksversion of this article here (HTML).

2.1.4 Visual Information Processing and Visual Memory   2.2 Social Cognitions: An Evolutionary Perspective   - Reading: Wikibook’s Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience: “Evolutionary Perspective on Social Cognitions” Link: Wikibook’s Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience:Evolutionary Perspective on Social Cognitions” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Please click on the above link and read the entirety of the chapter, which will provide you with a background regarding the evolutionary perspective on the function and purpose of social cognitions.
 
Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  You can find the original Wikibooksversion of this article here (HTML).

2.3 Motivation and Emotions: A Cognitive Neuropsychology Perspective   - Reading: Wikibook’s Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience: “Motivation and Emotion” and Georgia Southern University: Professor Russel A. Dewey’s Psychology: An Introduction: “Part Two: Cognitive Motives” Links: Wikibook’s Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience:Motivation and Emotion” (PDF) and Georgia Southern University: Professor Russel A. Dewey’s Psychology: An Introduction: “Part Two: Cognitive Motives” (HTML)
 
Instructions: For the first reading, please click on the above link and read the entirety of the article. 
 
For the second reading, please click on the above link, scroll down to “Part Two: Cognitive Motives,” and read the entirety of this section.
 
Terms of Use: The Wikibooks article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  You can find the original Wikibooks version of this article here (HTML).  For the GSU article, please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.