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PSYCH205: Clinical Psychology

Unit 1: An Introduction to Clinical Psychology as a Subspecialty   This unit will introduce you to the profession of Clinical Psychology and the concept of abnormal behavior. Unit 1 will first discuss the major tasks that clinical psychologists perform, including psychotherapy, research, and assessment. You will then work toward an understanding of how clinical psychologists think about people and the problems they experience, and how their approach is unique. You will learn, for example, that clinical psychologists tend to focus on describing, explaining, predicting, and changing human behavior. Lastly, you will learn about the historical context in which the concept of mental health developed, and discover how clinical psychology emerged from the broader field of psychology. 

Unit 1 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take you approximately 10.5 hours.

☐    Subunit 1.1: 3.5 hours

☐    Subunit 1.2: 7 hours

Unit1 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to: - describe the historical context of the emergence of clinical psychology; and - identify the differences between mental health professions in the broad field of clinical psychology.

1.1 Introduction to Clinical Psychology   - Lecture: YouTube: University of Houston: Professor Edward Sheridan’s Lecture Series, Clinical Psychology: “Lecture 1A–Lecture 1C” Link: YouTube: University of Houston: Professor Edward Sheridan’s Lecture Series, Clinical Psychology: “Lecture 1A–Lecture 1C” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch “Lecture 1A,” “Lecture 1B” and the first 43 minutes of “Lecture 1C.” These lectures cover Subunits 1.1.1–1.1.5. 
 
Watching these lectures should take approximately 2.5 hours.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: United States Department of Health and Human Services’ Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General (1999): “Chapter 1: Introduction and Themes” Link: United States Department of Health and Human Services’ MentalHealth: A Report of the Surgeon General (1999):** “Chapter 1: Introduction and Themes”(PDF)

    Instructions: Read the “Introduction and Themes” section. This reading will cover a basic introduction to and overarching themes of mental health and mental illness (subunit 1.2). Please note that the pages in the PDF bar at the top of the document do not match the pages in the table of contents section on the first page. 
     
    Reading this text and taking notes should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above. 

1.1.1 What Is Clinical Psychology?   Clinical psychology is a broad field that covers abnormal psychology and psychopathology, personality development, psychological testing, and psychotherapies.

Refer to Dr. Edward Sheridan's Lecture 1A for additional information.

1.1.2 How Does Clinical Psychology Compare to Other Mental Health Professions?   Clinical psychology is different from other mental health professions in terms of required education, licensing examinations, timeframe for degree completion, degree types, and career paths.

Refer to Dr. Edward Sheridan's Lecture 1A for additional information.

1.1.3 The Skills and Activities of Clinical Psychologists   Clinical psychologists have various skills and engage in many activities, including academia, research, and private practice.

Refer to Dr. Edward Sheridan's Lectures 1A and 1B for additional information.

1.1.4 Historical Emergence of Clinical Psychology and Major Developments   The historical emergence of and major developments in clinical psychology are evident in a variety of events, including the effects of world wars, the establishment of the APA, and the creation of major divisions and fields of study.

Refer to Dr. Edward Sheridan's Lecture 1B for additional information.

1.1.5 Scientist-practitioner Model versus Practitioner-scholar Model   There is much debate over the Scientist-practitioner Model (i.e., research) vs. the Practitioner-scholar Model (i.e., psychotherapy) as to which model accurately reflects the structure of the clinical psychology field.
           
Refer to Dr. Edward Sheridan’s Lecture 1C and The United States Department of Health and Human Services’ Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General (1999): “Chapter 1: Introduction and Themes,” pages 3–11 for additional information.

1.2 The Process of Diagnosis, Assessment, and the Clinical Interview   - Lecture: YouTube: University of Houston: Professor Edward Sheridan’s Lecture Series, Clinical Psychology: “Lecture 5B–Lecture 8A” Link: YouTube: University of Houston: Professor Edward Sheridan’s Lecture Series, Clinical Psychology: "Lecture 5B–Lecture 8A" (YouTube)

 Instructions: Start the video at 11:25 seconds and watch the
lecture until the end.  Second, please click on the link for the
lecture titled “Lecture 6A,” and watch this video. Please follow
these steps to watch all of “Lecture 6B,” “Lecture 6C,” “Lecture
7A,” “Lecture 7B,” “Lecture 7C,” and “Lecture 8A.” Each video is
approximately 40–55 minutes long. These lectures cover the topics
outlined in Subunits 1.2.1–1.2.5.   
    
 Watching these lectures and pausing to take notes should take
approximately 7 hours.  
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.1 Assessment   *Clinical psychology assessments include a variety of measures, including interviews, testing, observations, building relationships, identifying symptoms, obtaining life history and background information, and gathering data for diagnoses, all of which help to adequately establish a comprehensive representation of an individual’s life and life issues and determine means of treatment.

Refer to Dr. Edward Sheridan's Lecture 5B and 6A for additional information.*

1.2.2 Diagnosis   *Diagnosing of mental illness uses information gathered during assessment to determine type, severity, and treatment of illness. 

Refer to Dr. Edward Sheridan's Lecture 5B, 6A, and 6B for additional information.*

1.2.3 Semi-Structured Clinical Interview   *The semi-structured clinical interview focuses on the client, and what he or she wishes to disclose during therapy, whereby the therapist listens, allows the client to disclose whatever he/she wishes, and then reflects back what has been discussed.

Refer to Dr. Edward Sheridan’s Lectures 6A, 6B, and 6C for additional information.*

1.2.4 Formal Psychological Testing (e.g., intelligence and personality tests)   *Formal psychological testing, such as intelligence and personality testing, can be a very helpful screening instrument regarding clinical assessment and diagnoses.

Refer to Dr. Edward Sheridan’s Lectures 7A and 7B for additional information.*

1.2.5 Projective Assessments   *Projective assessments focus on subjective scoring and analysis, such as with the Rorschach inkblot test and thematic apperception test. These subjective measures can be interpreted as deep aspects or projections of an individual’s personality.

Refer to Dr. Edward Sheridan’s Lectures 7C and 8A for additional information.*

The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 1 Assessment”   - Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 1 Assessment” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 1 Assessment”

 Instructions: Complete this unit assessment. For each question,
pick the best possible answer. The correct answers will be displayed
when you click the "Submit" button.  

 You must be logged into your Saylor Foundation School account in
order to access this quiz.  If you do not yet have an account, you
will be able to create one, free of charge, after clicking the
link.  

 Completing this assessment should take approximately 15 minutes.