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PSYCH202B: Research Methods Lab

Unit 3: Study Designs   In the lecture section of this course, we reviewed the types and purposes of many of the study designs most commonly used in psychology research today.  However, real-life examples of these theoretical designs may not appear as clear-cut as they did in theory.  While it is important to be able to recognize which research designs are most applicable to certain research question, it is equally as important to understand how designs can be shaped in order to fit a question—a matter we will discuss in this unit.   We will first review the design structures described in the lecture and then take a look at experiments in which researchers applied design structures to real-life questions.  You should determine which study design is most appropriate to your research question.

3.1 Study Designs Revisited   - Assessment: Maricopa Center for Learning and Instruction’s "Research Methods: The Laboratory" The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

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3.1.1 Experimental Design and Quasi-Experimental Design   - Lecture: University of Wisconsin at OshKosh Johnson/Meyerson "Experimental Designs 1" and "Experimental Designs 2" Links: University of Wisconsin at OshKosh Johnson/Meyerson "Experimental Designs 1" (iTunes U) and "Experimental Designs 2" (iTunes U)

 Instructions: Please listen to the entire first lecture and through
minute 10 of the second lecture on experimental design for an
overview of what defines a true experiment.  Note the description of
a correlational study related to school achievement and television
viewing.  

 Toward the end of this lecture, the lecturer goes through the
process of setting up an experimental design.  Pay close attention
to these steps if you are planning to use an experimental design in
order to investigate your topic of interest.  The example he
discusses is an independent group design.  Also note that the
lecturer addresses an important topic in the second link: the
placebo effect.  Pay close attention to this.  This lecture applies
to subunits 3.1.1 and 3.1.2.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.1.1.1 Independent Group Design   3.1.2 Correlation   - Reading: Experiment Resources: Martyn Shuttleworth’s "Between Subjects Design" Link: Experiment Resources: Martyn Shuttleworth’s "Between Subjects Design" (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read the entirety of this webpage to review
the definition and usage of independent group design.  Please note
that independent group designs are often also called “between
subjects designs.”  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.1.4 Complex Experimental Designs   - Reading: Wikipedia’s “Factorial Experiment” Link: Wikipedia’s "Factorial Experiment" (PDF)

 Instructions: Please read the entirety of this webpage for a review
of factorial designs (otherwise known as complex experimental
designs).  

 Terms of Use: The Wikipedia article above is released under a
[Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License
3.0](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) (HTML).  You
can find the original version of this article
[here](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factorial_experiment) (HTML).

3.1.5 Posttest-Only Design   - Reading: Practical Assessment, Research, & Evaluation: Barry Gribbons and Joan Herman’s “True and Quasi-Experimental Designs” Link: Practical Assessment, Research, & Evaluation: Barry Gribbons and Joan Herman’s “True and Quasi-Experimental Designs” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please read the entirety of this article up until the
final section, titled “Recommendations for Evaluation,” for an
overview of quasi-experimental and experimental designs.  This
reading applies to subunits 3.1.5 and 3.1.6.  

 Terms of Use: The article above by Barry Gribbons and Joan Herman
has been reposted with permission for educational, noncommercial use
by PAREonline.net.  It can be viewed in its original form
[here](http://pareonline.net/getvn.asp?v=5&n=14).

3.1.6 Pre-Test/Post-Test Design   3.1.7 Repeated Measures Design   - Reading: Experiment Resources: Martyn Shuttleworth’s "Repeated Measures Design" Link: Experiment Resources: Martyn Shuttleworth’s "Repeated Measures Design" (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read the entirety of this webpage to review
the definition and usage of repeated measures designs.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.1.8 Survey Research   - Reading: Professor William Trochim’s “Survey Research” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

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3.1.9 Case Studies   - Reading: Colorado State University’s "Case Studies” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

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3.1.10 Naturalistic Observation   - Reading: Russel A. Dewey, Ph.D’s "Observational Research" Link: Russel A. Dewey, Ph.D’s "Observational Research" (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read the above webpage for a review of the
differences between naturalistic observation and controlled (or
systematic) observation.  Please note that you also read this
webpage in PSYCH202.  This reading applies to subunits 3.3.10 and
3.1.11.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.1.11 Systematic Observation   3.2 Examples of Use   3.2.1 Observational Studies   - Reading: American Psychological Association: Monitor on Psychology: S. Carpenter’s “Workplace Safety Tied to Job Security” Link: American Psychological Association: Monitor on Psychology: S. Carpenter’s "Workplace Safety Tied to Job Security" (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read the above article for a description of an
observational study.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.2.2 Animal vs. Human Studies   - Reading: American Psychological Association: Monitor on Psychology: Sadie F. Dingfelder’s “Fear Itself” Link: American Psychological Association: Monitor on Psychology: Sadie F. Dingfelder’s "Fear Itself" (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read the above article for a description of a
study applying findings from animal studies to human behavior.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.2.3 Experimental Studies: Within Subjects Designs   - Activity: The American Psychological Association’s Online Psychology Laboratory: Gettysburg College: Martha E. Arterberry and Professor William P. Wilson’s “Gender Perception” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

[Submit Materials](/contribute/)
  • Reading: The American Psychological Association’s Online Psychology Laboratory: Gettysburg College: Martha E. Arterberry and Professor William P. Wilson’s “Gender Perception” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

    Submit Materials

3.2.4 Experimental Studies: Between-Subjects Design   - Activity: The American Psychological Association’s Online Psychology Laboratory: Clarion University of Pennsylvania: Mark Mitchell’s “Be a Juror” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

[Submit Materials](/contribute/)

3.3 Deciding Which Design is Right for You   3.3.2 Proposed Audience   - Reading: Purdue Online Writing Lab’s “Identifying an Audience” Link: Purdue Online Writing Lab’s "Identifying an Audience" (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read the entirety of this webpage to learn
about questions to consider when deciding on your audience.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.3.3 Costs and Available Funds (Both Monetary and Resource Related)   - Reading: Social Psychology Network: Scott Plous’ “Sources of Research Funding” Links: Social Psychology Network: Scott Plous’ “Sources of Research Funding” (HTML)

 Instructions: Research often requires money and resources.  The
above link provides a list of resources and funding sources
available for student researchers.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.3.1 Population and Sample   - Reading: StatPac’s “Sampling Methods” Links: StatPac’s "Sampling Methods" (HTML)

 Instructions:  The above reading will give you a brief summary of
the sampling methods you learned about previously in the course.
 Consider the research question you are interested in answering and,
using this guide and what you know already about sampling, define an
ideal sample and population for your study and determine which
method would be best for obtaining their responses.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.