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PSYCH202B: Research Methods Lab

Unit 2: The Literature Review   As researchers develop their questions, they must perform a review of existing literature in order to discover previous studies conducted in their areas of interest and identify gaps in the field’s body of research.   Frequently, these gaps are just as important—if not more so—than the body of existing research.   This brief unit will present ways of finding, accessing, and narrowing existing research documentation through either the Internet or a library.   By the end of this unit, the student should feel comfortable with this process, as it will be performed frequently throughout both the remainder of this program and over the course of your career in psychology.  You should also consider performing a literature review for the question you developed in Unit 1.

2.1 Available Literature Searches   2.1.1 Online General Search Tools (e.g.PsycINFO)   - Web Media: YouTube: PsycINFO Training Video’s “APA PsycNET Direct Part 1 and "APA PsycNET Direct Part 2" and "PsycINFO on EBSCOhost: Finding Peer-Reviewed Items." The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

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  • Reading: Douglas Degelman’s "Literature Search Essentials" and About.com: Psychology: Kendra Cherry’s “Full-Text Psychology Journals” Links: Douglas Degelman’s "Literature Search Essentials" (HTML) and About.  com: Psychology: Kendra Cherry’s “Full-Text Psychology Journals” (HTML)

    Instructions: In PSYCH202, you read Douglas Degelman’s “Literature Search Essentials”.  Please review the description and directions for using ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center), another resource for conducting literature searches.  If you are not enrolled in a school system, you will only be able to access the abstracts for many of the journals that you find.  After reading the descriptions and directions,   conduct a search for your topic using this database.  Kendra Cherry’s webpage provides a number of other free resources for accessing certain full-text psychology journals online without a subscription or membership.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.2 Offline General Search Tools and Library Look-Ups   - Reading: University of Washington: Psychology Writing Center’s "Writing a Psychology Literature Review" Link: University of Washington: Psychology Writing Center’s "Writing a Psychology Literature Review” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please access the above file, which you should have
saved when you first encountered it in Unit 1.3.  If you have not
already saved it, clicking on the above link will bring you to the
University of Washington’s Psychology Writing Center.  Scroll down
to the list of writing guides, and under the section “Scientific
Writing & APA Format,” click on “Writing a Psychology Literature
Review”.  

 Please read pages 2-3 of this article: “Library Research.”  This
reading addresses subunits 2.1.2 through 2.1.3.  

 Terms of Use: The material above has been reposted with permission
for educational, noncommercial use by The University of Washington.
 It can be viewed in its original form
[here](http://www.psych.uw.edu/psych.php#p=187).

2.1.3 Specific Journal Searches   2.2 What To Read For   2.2.1 The Importance of the Abstract   - Reading: University of Washington: Psychology Writing Center’s "Writing a Psychology Literature Review" Link: University of Washington: Psychology Writing Center’s "Writing a Psychology Literature Review (PDF)

 Instructions: Please access the above file, which you should have
saved when you first encountered it in sub-units 1.3 and 2.1.2.  If
you did not save it, clicking on the above link will bring you to
the University of Washington’s Psychology Writing Center.  Scroll
down to the list of writing guides, and under the section
“Scientific Writing & APA Format” click on “Writing a Psychology
Literature Review.”  

 Please read pages 3-8 of this article in order to understand what
to read for when conducting literature reviews, as well as how to
present studies in your literature reviews.  This reading covers
subunits 2.2.1 to 2.2.5.  

 Terms of Use: The material above has been reposted with permission
for educational, noncommercial use by The University of Washington.
 It can be viewed in its original form
[here](http://www.psych.uw.edu/psych.php#p=187).

2.2.2 If the Abstract is Relevant: Move to Discussion   2.2.3 An Understanding of Methods and Results   2.2.4 What Information Should be Used in a New Article   2.2.5 How to Communicate Previous Findings in a New Article