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POLSC432: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

Unit 4: Civil Liberties: Criminal Justice   As made clear in the previous units, the main source of citizens' rights in America is the Bill of Rights, the first ten amendments to the Constitution. The Bill of Rights details the rights of the American people and forbids the government to violate those rights. Clearly the framers of the Constitution thought that protecting citizens from a tyrannical criminal system was a priority, considering that four of the amendments in the Bill of Rights pertain directly to criminal justice. These amendments provide liberties that protect the procedural rights that apply to citizens accused of a crime, defendants in criminal cases, and those convicted of a crime.The material in the following unit will cover the history of these liberties both in the context of the framing of the Constitution and in their development in the courts across time.

Unit 4 Time Advisory
This unit should take you approximately 11 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 4.1: 7 hours ☐    Subunit 4.1.1: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 4.1.2: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 4.1.3: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 4.1.4: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 4.2: 4 hours

Unit4 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
  - Explain the constitutional framework and philosophy of the amendments related to criminal justice. - Analyze the landmark court cases dealing with criminal justice.

4.1 The Bill of Rights and Criminal Justice   4.1.1 The Fourth Amendment   - Reading: Findlaw’s “Fourth Amendment- Search and Seizure” Link: Findlaw’s “Fourth Amendment- Search and Seizure” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the Amendment and then all of the 4th Amendment Annotations linked on the page above. These links will provide the historical background on the amendment, its development as related to criminal justice, and contemporary applications. This reading should take approximately 2 hours to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

4.1.2 The Fifth Amendment   - Reading: Findlaw’s “Fifth Amendment- Rights of Persons” Link: Findlaw’s “Fifth Amendment- Rights of Persons” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the Amendment and then all of the 5th Amendment Annotations linked on the page above. These links will provide the historical background on the amendment, its development as related to criminal justice, and contemporary applications. This reading should take approximately 2 hours to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

4.1.3 The Sixth Amendment   - Reading: Findlaw’s “Sixth Amendment- Rights of Accused in Criminal Prosecutions” Link: Findlaw’s “Sixth Amendment- Rights of Accused in Criminal Prosecutions” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the Amendment and then all of the 6th Amendment Annotations linked on the page above. These links will provide the historical background on the amendment, its development as related to criminal justice, and contemporary applications. This reading should take approximately 2 hours to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

4.1.4 The Eighth Amendment   - Reading: Findlaw’s “Eighth Amendment- Further Guarantees in Criminal Cases” Link: Findlaw’s “Eighth Amendment- Further Guarantees in Criminal Cases” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the Amendment and then all of the 8th Amendment Annotations linked on the page above. These links will provide the historical background on the amendment, its development as related to criminal justice, and contemporary applications. This reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

4.2 Landmark Court Cases   4.2.1 Gideon v. Wainwright   - Reading: Findlaw: The U.S. Supreme Court’s “Gideon v. Wainwright Opinion” Link: Findlaw: The U.S. Supreme Court’s “Gideon v. Wainwright Opinion” (HTML)  
 
Instructions: Please read the text linked above in its entirety. This reading provides the official opinion of the court. This reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: PBS: Alex McBride’s “Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)” Link: PBS: Alex McBride’s “Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)” (HTML)  
     
    Instructions: Please read the text linked above in its entirety. Also read the links within the text. This reading provides a basic description of the case establishing that that states must provide defense attorneys to criminal defendants charged with serious offenses who cannot afford lawyers themselves. This reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

4.2.2 Miranda v. Arizona   - Reading: Findlaw: The U.S. Supreme Court’s “Miranda v. Arizona Opinion” Link: Findlaw: The U.S. Supreme Court’s “Miranda v. Arizona Opinion” (HTML)  
 
Instructions: Please read the text linked above in its entirety. This reading provides the official opinion of the court. This reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: PBS: Alex McBride’s “Miranda v. Arizona (1966)” Link: PBS: Alex McBride’s “Miranda v. Arizona (1966)” (HTML)  
     
    Instructions: Please read the text linked above in its entirety.  Also read the links within the text. This reading provides a basic description of the case establishing that criminal suspects must be informed of their constitutional rights before being charged with a crime.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.