Loading...

POLSC321: Mideast Politics

Unit 16: The Arab Uprisings of 2011   On December 17, 2010, a Tunisian fruit vendor named Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire in frustration and in protest of the lack of opportunity available to him in Tunisia.  This set off a political uprising in Tunisia that soon spread to Egypt, Libya, and across whole of the Middle East.  In this unit, you will investigate the causes of these uprisings, the primary threats to democratization in the region, and the systems of government that are likely to emerge from these movements.

Unit 16 Time Advisory
This unit should take approximately 11.75 hours to complete.

☐    Introduction: 2.5 hours

☐    Subunit 16.1: 1.75 hours

☐    Subunit 16.2: 3.25 hours

☐    Subunit 16.3: 1.25 hours

☐    Subunit 16.4: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 16.5: 2 hours

Unit16 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
- Identify the causes and origins of the Arab uprisings of 2011. - Identify the potential consequences of the uprisings. - Differentiate between societies where the uprisings have been successful and those in which they have yet to succeed.

  • Reading: Jadaliyya: Michael Hudson’s “Awakening, Cataclysm, or Just a Series of Events? Reflections on the Current Wave of Protest in the Arab World?” Link: Jadaliyya: Michael Hudson’s “Awakening, Cataclysm, or Just a Series of Events? Reflections on the Current Wave of Protest in the Arab World” (HTML) (MP3)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire article.  You may also click on the “Listen” link to listen to the podcast (30:34 minutes).  Please note that this resource covers the topics for all of the subunits in Unit 16.
     
    Reading this text and listening to the podcast should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Web Media: Free Video Lectures: Harvard University’s “Inside the Arab Awakening” Link: Free Video Lectures: Harvard University’s “Inside the Arab Awakening” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view the entire video lecture.  Please note that this resource covers the topics for all of the subunits in Unit 16.
     
    Viewing this lecture and pausing to take notes should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

16.1 Tunisia   - Reading: UCLA Center for Near Eastern Studies: Lotfi Ben Rejeb’s “The Tunisian Revolution and Implications for U.S. and Tunisian Relations” Link: UCLA Center for Near Eastern Studies: Lotfi Ben Rejeb’s “The Tunisian Revolution and Implications for U.S. and Tunisian Relations” (MP3)
 
Instructions: Please click on the link above, read the brief introductory paragraph, and listen to the entire podcast to learn about the causes and consequences of the Tunisian uprising.
 
You should spend approximately 45 minutes on this resource.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

16.1.1 Causes   - Reading: Middle East Research and Information Project: Nadia Marzouki’s “From People to Citizens in Tunisia” Link: Middle East Research and Information Project: Nadia Marzouki’s “From People to Citizens in Tunisia” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire text to study the causes of the uprising in Tunisia.
 
You should spend approximately 30 minutes on this resource.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

16.1.2 Influence outside Tunisia   - Reading: Pacific Standard: Philip N. Howard’s “The Arab Spring’s Cascading Effects” Link: Pacific Standard: Philip N. Howard’s “The Arab Spring’s Cascading Effects” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire article to learn about the effects of the Tunisian uprising across the Middle East.
 
You should spend approximately 30 minutes on this resource.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

16.2 Egypt   - Web Media: PBS’s “Revolution in Cairo” Link: PBS’s “Revolution in Cairo” (Flash)
 
Instructions: Please click on the link above, and watch the first part of the video called “Revolution in Cairo.”  Focus on the causes of the uprising, the government’s response to it, and the prospects for democracy in Egypt.
 
You should spend approximately 30 minutes on this resource.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Web Media: University of California at Irvine’s OpenCourseWare: “Speaking Out on Egypt” Link: University of California at Irvine’s OpenCourseWare: “Speaking Out on Egypt” (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view this entire video.  Focus on the causes of the uprising, the government’s response to it, and the prospects for democracy in Egypt.
     
    Viewing this video and pausing to take notes should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Web Media: Documentary Storm’s “Egypt: A Nation in Waiting” Link: Documentary Storm’s “Egypt: A Nation in Waiting” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and download the video to watch.  This video addresses the aspects of the Mubarak government that precipitated the uprising.
     
    You should spend approximately 1 hour on this resource.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Reading: Time: Ayman Mohyeldin’s “A Year after Egypt’s Uprising: One Revolution, Two Perspectives” Link: Time: Ayman Mohyeldin’s “A Year after Egypt’s Uprising: One Revolution, Two Perspectives” (HTML)

    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire article, which addresses the predicament laid out by Mohyeldin.
     
    You should spend approximately 15 minutes on this resource.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

16.3 Libya   - Reading: Reuters’ “Timeline: Libya’s Uprising against Muammar Gaddafi” Link: Reuters’ “Timeline: Libya’s Uprising against Muammar Gaddafi” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please click on the link above, study the timeline, and use this as an overview of the Libyan uprising.
 
You should spend approximately 15-20 minutes studying this resource.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Web Media: YouTube: Aljazeera’s “Fault Lines: The U.S. and New Middle East: Libya” Link: YouTube: Aljazeera’s “Fault Lines: The U.S. and New Middle East: Libya” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view this entire video, which discusses the causes of the uprising and the reasons for the NATO intervention.
     
    You should spend approximately 30 minutes on this resource.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Reading: Middle East Policy Council’s “Is Libya’s Future at Risk?” Link: Middle East Policy Council’s “Is Libya’s Future at Risk?” (HTML)

    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the article.  Focus on the prospects for democracy in Libya.
     
    You should spend approximately 15-20 minutes on this resource.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Reading: MSNBC’s “A Year after Revolt: Libya Mired in Factional Fighting” Link: MSNBC’s “A Year after Revolt: Libya Mired in Factional Fighting” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and study the information on this webpage.  Focus on the prospects for establishing a stable government in Libya.
     
    You should spend approximately 15-20 minutes on this resource.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

16.4 Bahrain   - Web Media: YouTube: Aljazeera’s “Featured Documentaries: Bahrain: Shouting in the Dark” Link: YouTube: Aljazeera’s “Featured Documentaries: Bahrain: Shouting in the Dark” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view the entire video, which addresses the reasons for the uprising, the government’s response, and the relevance of conflict between Sunnis and Shias.
 
Viewing this video lecture and pausing to take notes should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

16.5 Syria   - Web Media: UCLA International: Professor James Gelvin’s “Whither Syria? Historian Gelvin Looks at Arab Uprisings” Link: UCLA International: Professor James Gelvin’s “Whither Syria? Historian Gelvin Looks at Arab Uprisings” (MP3)
 
Instructions: Please click on the link above, and listen to the entire podcast.  Focus on Gelvin’s account of the Syrian regime and the role it played in causing the uprising.
 
Listening to this podcast and pausing to take notes should take approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Web Media: MSNBC’s “Up with Chris Hayes” Link: MSNBC’s “Up with Chris Hayes” (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view the entire video, which discusses the makeup of the uprising in Syria.
     
    You should approximately 15 minutes on this resource.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Reading: Middle East Policy Council’s “Running Out of Options in Syria” Link: Middle East Policy Council’s “Running Out of Options in Syria” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire article, which considers how, if at all, the U.S. and NATO could intervene in Syria.
     
    Studying this reading should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.