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POLSC321: Mideast Politics

Unit 15: The Wars in Afghanistan (2001) and Iraq (2003)   After the attacks of September 11, 2001, the United States and its allies responded by (among other things) intervening militarily in Afghanistan and Iraq.  In this unit, you will investigate the reasons for these interventions and their impact on the region.  In order to understand the ongoing war in Iraq, it is necessary to first understand the causes and consequences of the Iraq war of 1990.

Unit 15 Time Advisory
This unit should take approximately 25 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 15.1: 2.5 hours

☐    Subunit 15.2: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 15.3: 15.75 hours

 

☐    Sub-subunit 15.3.1: 1.5 hours

 

☐    Sub-subunit 15.3.2: 14.25 hours

 

☐    Readings: 11 hours

 

☐    Web Media: 3.25 hours

 

☐    Subunit 15.4: 5.75 hours

 

☐    Introduction: 1 hour

 

☐    Sub-subunit 15.4.1: 3.5 hours

 

☐    Sub-subunit 15.4.2: 1.25 hours

Unit15 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
- Identify the principal goals of the U.S. in the Middle East. - Identify the reasons for Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait in 1990. - Define and describe Desert Storm and Desert Shield. - Identify the causes of the Kurdish refugee crisis in the aftermath of the Gulf War of 1990. - Identify the terms of the 1990 Gulf War’s cease-fire document. - Summarize the consequences of the U.S. intervention in Iraq (2003). - Identify the causes and consequences of the U.S. intervention Afghanistan. - Summarize the likely impact of a U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.

15.1 U.S. Hegemony   - Web Media: YouTube: LSE’s “A Broken Middle East: A Wasted Decade of War on Terror” Link: YouTube: LSE’s “A Broken Middle East: A Wasted Decade of War on Terror” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view the video from the beginning to 53:30 minutes.  Keep in mind that this was recorded prior to Arab Spring.  Focus on U.S. priorities in the Middle East and how it pursued those priorities.
 
Viewing this video and pausing to take notes should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please resect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: Center for Strategic and International Studies’ “Global Security Forum: How Will the United States Engage in the Middle East after Iraq and Afghanistan?” Link: Center for Strategic and International Studies’ “Global Security Forum: How Will the United States Engage in the Middle East after Iraq and Afghanistan?” (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, listen to the audio, and consider the current challenges to U.S. hegemony in the Middle East.
     
    Studying this resource should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please resect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

15.2 Dual Containment   - Reading: CATO Institute: Barbara Conry’s “America’s Misguided Policy of Dual Containment in the Persian Gulf” Link: CATO Institute: Barbara Conry’s “America’s Misguided Policy of Dual Containment in the Persian Gulf” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read this article that discusses the policy of dual containment and Conry’s assessment of its success.
 
Studying this resource should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please resect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

15.3 U.S. policy toward Iraq   15.3.1 The Gulf War (1990)   - Reading: PBS Frontline: The Gulf War: “Chronology” and PBS’s “The Persian Gulf War” Link: PBS Frontline: The Gulf War: “Chronology” (HTML) and PBS’s “The Persian Gulf War” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please click on the links above, and read these entire articles, which review the most significant moments in the Gulf War.
 
You should spend approximately 30 minutes on these resources.
 
Terms of Use: Please resect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: Concord Learning Systems: Dr. David A. Deese’s “Persian Gulf War” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

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  • Reading: History.com’s “Persian Gulf War” Link: History.com’s “Persian Gulf War” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire article, which addresses the causes and consequences of the war.
     
    Studying this resource should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please resect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

15.3.2 The 2003 Iraq Invasion   - Web Media: University of California Irvine: Lecture on “2003 Iraq Invasion” Link: University of California Irvine: Lecture on “2003 Iraq Invasion” (Flash)
 
Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view the entire video lecture.  Focus on the causes and consequences of the war.
 
Viewing this video and pausing to take notes should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Reading: Middle East Forum: The Middle East Quarterly: David A. Patten’s “Is Iraq in a Civil War?” Link: Middle East Forum: The Middle East Quarterly: David A. Patten’s “Is Iraq in a Civil War?” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire article on the origin of the civil war and the chances that the conflict will re-emerge.

    Studying this resource should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Reading: The Atlantic: James Fallows’ “Blind into Baghdad” Link: The Atlantic: James Fallows’ “Blind into Baghdad” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire article to learn about what was and was not considered in the planning of the war.
     
    You should spend approximately 2 hours studying this reading.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Web Media: PBS: Bill Moyers’ “Buying the War” Link: PBS: Bill Moyers’ “Buying the War” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, read the brief introductory text on the webpage, select the “Watch the video” link, and view all 5 parts of the video series.  You may also click on the “Transcript” link and read along with the transcript.  Focus on how the U.S. government made the case for war to the public and the role of the media in this process.

    Reading the introduction and transcript and viewing all five parts of the video should take approximately 2 hours to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Reading: PBS’s “Who Are the Insurgents?” Link: PBS’s “Who Are the Insurgents?” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire article to learn about the ideology and composition of the insurgency.

    You should spend approximately 15-20 minutes on this resource.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Reading: The Daily Beast: Leslie H. Gelb’s “How to Save Iraq” Link: The Daily Beast: Leslie H. Gelb’s “How to Save Iraq” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire article.  Consider Gelb’s proposal for Iraq and why it may or may not be viable.
     
    You should spend approximately 15 minutes on this resource.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage
    displayed above.

  • Reading: Center for Strategic and International Studies: Anthony H. Cordesman, Adam Mausner, Sam Khazai, Peter Alsis, and Charles Loi’s “The Real Outcome of the Iraq War: US and Iranian Strategic Competition in Iraq” Link: Center for Strategic and International Studies: Anthony H. Cordesman, Adam Mausner, Sam Khazai, Peter Alsis, and Charles Loi’s “The Real Outcome of the Iraq War: US and Iranian Strategic Competition in Iraq” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, read the introductory text on the main webpage, and select the link titled “Download the PDF of ‘The Real Outcome of the Iraq War: US and Iranian Strategic Competition in Iraq.”  Please read the entire text (128 pages), which addresses the effect of the Iraq War on Iran’s regional influence.

    Studying this reading should take approximately 7 hours to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Web Media: NPR: Tom Bowman’s “As the Iraq War Ends, Reassessing the U.S. Surge” Link: NPR: Tom Bowman’s “As the Iraq War Ends, Reassessing the U.S. Surge” (MP3)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, read the brief introductory text on the webpage, and listen to the podcast.  Focus on what the “surge” was and on the various assessments of its success.
     
    You should spend approximately 15 minutes on this resource.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Reading: Global Spin: Tony Karon’s “Iraq after the War: Maliki’s Attack on Sunni Leaders Suggests a Dark, Divided Future” Link: Global Spin: Tony Karon’s “Iraq after the War: Maliki’s Attack on Sunni Leaders Suggests a Dark, Divided Future” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire article, which focuses on the danger of a renewed civil war in Iraq.

    You should spend approximately 30 minutes on this resource.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

15.4 U.S. Policy toward Afghanistan   - Web Media: YouTube: The Real News’ “Brzezinski on the Afghan War, Part 1,” “Brzezinski on the Afghan War, Part 2,” and “Brzezinski on the Afghan War, Part 3” Links: YouTube: The Real News’ “Brzezinski on the Afghan War, Part 1”, (YouTube) “Brzezinski on the Afghan War, Part 2”, (YouTube) and “Brzezinski on the Afghan War, Part 3” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Please click on the links above, and view Parts 1-3 of this video series, which explores how the U.S. might leave Afghanistan peacefully.  Consider the relevance of the Soviet war in Afghanistan for the United States’ current war there.

 You should spend approximately 30 minutes on these resources.  
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the
webpage displayed above.
  • Web Media: PBS’s “Afghanistan: The Forgotten War” Link: PBS’s “Afghanistan: The Forgotten War” (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view the entire video.  Focus on the American goals in Afghanistan and the nature of the insurgency.

    You should spend approximately 30 minutes on this resource.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

15.4.1 Connection between Afghanistan and Pakistan   - Web Media: PBS Frontline’s “The Secret War” and Azmat Khan’s “What Kind of Ally Is Pakistan?” Link: PBS Frontline’s “The Secret War” and Azmat Khan’s “What Kind of Ally Is Pakistan?” (Flash)
 
Instructions: Please click on the first link above, and view the entire video on “The Secret War.”  Focus on Pakistan’s role in both assisting and combatting the
Taliban, as well as the effects of the “Drone War.”  Afterward, click on the second link.  Follow the links within the texts to the articles.  Read them, focusing on the basis of the U.S.-Pakistan alliance and the reasons why the relationship between these two countries have recently been strained.
 
You should spend approximately 3 hours and 30 minutes studying these resources.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

15.4.2 Consequences of U.S. Withdrawal   - Reading: Asia Times: MK Bhadrakumar’s “There’s More to Peace than Taliban” Link: Asia Times: MK Bhadrakumar’s “There’s More to Peace than Taliban” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire article, which discusses the likely consequences of a U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.
 
You should spend approximately 15-20 minutes on this resource.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Reading: Middle East Foreign Policy’s “Reaction to Announcement of U.S. Withdrawal from Afghanistan” and Mark N. Katz’s “Will the Taliban Rise Again?” Links: Middle East Foreign Policy’s “Reaction to Announcement of U.S. Withdrawal from Afghanistan” (HTML) and Mark N. Katz’s “Will the Taliban Rise Again?” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the links above, and read both articles in their entirety.  Focus on how conflict might be minimized in the aftermath of the U.S. withdrawal, as well as on the rise, decline, and possible resurgence of the Taliban.
     
    Studying these resources should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.