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POLSC321: Mideast Politics

Unit 12: Economic and Political Liberalization   Since the 1970s, there has been pressure on Middle Eastern states—emanating both from within and from outside the Middle East—to liberalize economically and politically.  In this unit, you will identify the primary components of economic and political liberalization, investigate the origin of liberalization and the agenda driving it, and consider impact of these policies on particular societies in the region.

Unit 12 Time Advisory
This unit should take approximately 9 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 12.1: 2.5 hours

☐    Subunit 12.2: 6.5 hours

☐    Readings: 5.5 hours

☐    Web Media: 1 hour

Unit12 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
- Discuss the concepts of statism and liberalization as economic policies. - Identify the circumstances under which Third World nations are likely to restructure their economies. - Summarize the general consequences of economic liberalization in the Middle East. - Identify the reasons why Middle Eastern states have been slow to democratize. - Summarize the extent to which democracy has flourished in the Middle East.

12.1 Economic Restructuring   - Reading: Carnegie Council: Vali Nasr’s “Forces of Fortune: The Rise of the New Muslim Middle Class and What It Will Mean for Our World” Link: Carnegie Council: Vali Nasr’s “Forces of Fortune: The Rise of the New Muslim Middle Class and What It Will Mean for Our World” (Flash)
 
Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view the entire video.  Focus on the arguments for and against statism (state intervention in the economy) and liberalization (shrinking the state, removing barriers to free trade and foreign investment, privatizing ownership of state-run enterprises).
 
You should spend approximately 30 minutes on this resource.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Web Media: UCLA International Institute: Joel Beinin’s “The Egyptian Intifada in Historical Perspective” Link: UCLA International Institute: Joel Beinin’s “The Egyptian Intifada in Historical Perspective” (HTML) (MP3)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, read the brief article, and listen to the entire podcast.  Focus on the relationship between Egypt’s economic policies and Egyptian politics.
     
    Listening to this podcast and reading this text should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Reading: Middle East Research and Information Project: Joel Beinin’s “Egyptian Textile Workers Confront the New Economic Order” Link: Middle East Research and Information Project: Joel Beinin’s “Egyptian Textile Workers Confront the New Economic Order” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire article to learn about the effects of liberalization on textile workers.
     
    Studying this reading should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

12.2 Political Restructuring or Democratization   - Reading: New York University: Ellen Lust-Okar’s “Why the Failure of Democratization? Explaining ‘Middle East Exceptionalism’” Link: New York University: Ellen Lust-Okar’s “Why the Failure of Democratization? Explaining ‘Middle East Exceptionalism’” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Please click on the link above, scroll down the webpage to the date March 3rd, and click on link to "Why the Failure of Democratization? Explaining 'Middle East Exceptionalism" to download the PDF file.  Please read the entire text (36 pages).  As you read, try to identify the obstacles to democratization in the Middle East.
 
You should spend approximately 3 hours studying this resource.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Web Media: Carnegie Council: John L. Eposito’s “The Future of Islam” Link: Carnegie Council: John L. Esposito’s “The Future of Islam” (Flash)
      
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and view the entire video.  Focus on Esposito’s critique of the claim that Islam and democracy are incompatible.
     
    You should spend approximately 1 hour on this resource.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Reading: The Brookings Institution: Shadi Hamid’s “The Struggle of Middle East Democracy” Link: The Brookings Institution: Shadi Hamid’s “The Struggle of Middle East Democracy” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above, and read the entire text, which discusses the reasons for the recent manifestation of democratic movements.
     
    You should spend approximately 1 hour studying this resource.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.

  • Reading: Middle East Research and Information Project: Mona El-Ghobashy’s “Egypt’s Paradoxical Elections,” Samer Shehata’s “The Brotherhood Goes to Parliament,” and Samer Shehata and Joshua Stacher’s “Boxing in the Brothers” Links: Middle East Research and Information Project: Mona El-Ghobashy’s “Egypt’s Paradoxical Elections”, (HTML) Samer Shehata’s “The Brotherhood Goes to Parliament”, (HTML) and Samer Shehata and Joshua Stacher’s “Boxing in the Brothers” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the links above, and read all 3 articles in their entirety.  These readings will help you gain a better understanding of the impact of the Muslim Brotherhood on democratization in Egypt.

    Studying these resources should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the webpage displayed above.