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POLSC211: Introduction to International Relations

Unit 4: International Conflict   In this unit, we will take a closer look at war as a means of resolving conflict. We will examine war from both a Realist’s and a Liberalist’s perspective, and ask whether conflict between nations is inevitable. We will also explore complex global welfare issues that require international cooperation for resolution.

Unit 4 Time Advisory
Completing this unit will take approximately 13 hours.

☐    Subunit 4.1: 4 hours

☐    Subunit 4.2: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 4.3: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 4.4: 7 hours ☐    Sub-subunit 4.4.1: 2 hours

☐    Sub-subunit 4.4.2: 1 hour

☐    Sub-subunit 4.4.3: 2 hours

☐    Sub-subunit 4.4.4: 1 hour

☐    Sub-subunit 4.4.5: 1 hour

Unit4 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
- discuss and explain the various analytical and theoretical positions used in the subfield of international relations to explain world politics; - describe specific issues that have relevance to the study of interstate relations, national security, war, economic integration, trade, and so forth; and - identify and discuss global environmental issues.

4.1 War and Realism   4.1.1 War as Normal Method of Resolution   - Reading: Harvard University: Professor Dan Reiter’s “Exploring the Bargaining Model of War” Link: Harvard University: Professor Dan Reiter’s Exploring the Bargaining Model of War (PDF)
 
Instructions: Please read this entire article.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above. 

4.1.2 Failure of Peaceful Resolution of Dispute   - Reading: Oxford University Press’s European Journal of International Law: Anne Peters’ “International Dispute Settlement: A Network of Cooperational Duties” Link: Oxford University Press’s European Journal of International Law: Anne Peters’ International Dispute Settlement: A Network of Cooperational Duties” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Select the “Full Text PDF” hyperlink below the title “International Dispute Settlement: A Network of Cooperational Duties” to download the article.  
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above. 

4.2 War and Liberalism   - Reading: The Atlantic: David M. Kennedy’s “What Would Wilson Do?” Link: The Atlantic: David M. Kennedy’s What Would Wilson Do? (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this article by David M. Kennedy on Wilson’s legacy on foreign policy.  In political science, “idealism” is called “political liberalism,” but they can be used interchangeably.
 
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4.3 Just War Theory   - Web Media: Bigthink.com: “Michael Walzer on Just War Theory” Link: Bigthink.com: Michael Walzer on Just War Theory (Adobe Flash)
 
Instructions: Watch Professor Michael Walzer describe the Just War Theory by clicking on the “play” button for this video.  Professor Walzer, Emeritus Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study, is a leading scholar in contemporary political philosophy and especially on Just War Theory.  This resource will also cover sub-subunits 4.3.1-4.3.3.

 Watching this video should take approximately 5 minutes.   
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Brian Orend’s “War: Just War Theory” Link: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Brian Orend’s War: Just War Theory (HTML)

    Instructions: Read Section 2, including sub-sections 2.1-2.3, on Just War Theory from the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.  Note that this reading also covers the topics outlined in sub-subunits 4.3.1-4.3.3.
     
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4.3.1 Jus Ad Bellum   Note: This subunit is covered by the web media and reading assigned beneath subunit 4.3.

4.3.2 Jus In Bello   Note: This subunit is covered by the web media and reading assigned beneath subunit 4.3.

4.3.3 Jus Post Bellum   Note: This subunit is covered by the web media and reading assigned beneath subunit 4.3.

4.4 Other Sources of Conflict   4.4.1 Global Poverty   - Web Media: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars: “Too Poor for Peace? Links between Poverty, Conflict, Demography, and Environment” Link: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars: Too Poor for Peace? Links between Poverty, Conflict, Demography, and Environment (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Read the introductory text on the webpage, and click on the play button to watch the presentation by Professor Colin Kahl. 

 Watching this video should take approximately 2 hours.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
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4.4.2 Disease and Pandemics   - Reading: Council on Foreign Relations: Laurie A. Garrett’s “HIV and National Security: What Are the Links?” Link: Council on Foreign Relations: Laurie A. Garrett’s HIV and National Security: What Are the Links? (PDF)
 
Instructions: To access the publication, click on the above link.  Under the graphic of the report cover, hold your mouse over the “Download Now” button and click on the link “HIV and National Security” to download the PDF file.  Read the following parts of the report: “Executive Summary,” “Why a HIV/Security Linkage Matters,” “Relationship between Conflict and HIV,” and “Social Instability: Security and Afflicted States.” 
 
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4.4.3 Food Security   - Reading: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations: Slobodanka B. Teodosijevic’s “Armed Conflicts and Food Security” Link: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations: Slobodanka B. Teodosijevic’s “Armed Conflicts and Food Security” (PDF)

 Instructions: Scroll down to the bottom of the page and click on
the title “Armed Conflicts and Food Security,” which will take you
to the abstract. Click on the PDF link on the right side of the page
to open the full article.    
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above. 

4.4.4 Energy Security   - Web Media: iTunes U: Stanford University: “Faces on Energy Security” Link: iTunes U: Stanford University: Faces on Energy Security (iTunes U)
 
Instructions: Scroll down to track 48, and select View in iTunes for “Faces on Energy Security,”  and listen to this roundtable discussion.

 Listening to this podcast will take approximately 45 minutes.   
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

4.4.5 Ethnic and Religious Differences   - Assessment: The Saylor Foundation's “Unit 4 Assessment” and “Unit 4 Sample Essay” Link: The Saylor Foundation's “Unit 4 Assessment” (PDF) and “Unit 4 Sample Essay” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Complete this “Unit 4 Assessment.”  After you have completed the Assessment, check your response against the “Unit 4 Sample Essay.”

  • Reading: TheFreeLibrary’s Harvard International Review: Professor Jonathan Fox’s “The Independent Nature of Ethnic Strife” Links: TheFreeLibrary’s Harvard International Review: Professor Jonathan Fox’s “The Independent Nature of Ethnic Strife” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this article.
     
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  • Web Media: iTunes U: Yale University: “Faith and Violence: Interview with Peter Kuzmic” Link: iTunes U: Yale University: Faith and Violence: Interview with Peter Kuzmic (iTunes U)

    Instructions: Scroll down to track 37, and select “View in iTunes” for “Faith and Violence: Interview with Peter Kuzmic.” Listen to the interview with Professor Peter Kuzmic as he discusses the ethnic violence that broke out in former Yugoslavia after the end of the Cold War.

    Listening to this podcast should take approximately 25 minutes. 
     
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Unit 4 Assessment   - Assessment: The Saylor Foundation's “Conflict and Conflict Resolution” Instructions: Your assessment for Unit 4 is to write a paper on “Conflict and Conflict Resolution.” Go through your notes from the unit so you will be able to summarize the main concepts in a two page written paper. 

 When you have finished writing, please compare your paper to the
Saylor Foundation's
[“](http://www.saylor.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/POLSC211-Unit-4-Conflict-and-Conflict-Resolution-FINAL.pdf)</span>[<span
lang="EN">Conflict and Conflict Resolution: Sample
Paper</span>](http://www.saylor.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/POLSC211-Unit-4-Conflict-and-Conflict-Resolution-FINAL.pdf)<span
lang="EN">[”](http://www.saylor.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/POLSC211-Unit-4-Conflict-and-Conflict-Resolution-FINAL.pdf).
Be sure your content is similar to the content in the sample paper,
to be sure you are getting the most important information from the
material you are covering. Also, read your paper out loud to be sure
it flows smoothly, and check your paragraphs to be sure that, in
general, they have opening statements, supporting statements (3),
and concluding statements. Did you use spell check? You could also
ask someone else to read your paper, and make comments. And finally,
be sure any quotes you have used are properly identified and credit
given. Grading: take one grade off for incomplete content, take one
grade off for grammatical errors, and take one grade off if it
doesn't read smoothly (make sense); all 3 errors would make a D
paper.</span>