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ME403: Student Design Project

Unit 3: Design Implementation   In this unit, you will engage in a complete design project.  The unit goes step by step through the basics of a full design, starting with defining the problem, and moving through identifying the needs and metrics, generating and selecting the concept, and finally, implementing and analyzing the project.  While the unit presents this as a linear process, in practice it is quite iterative.  Assessments allow you to meet major milestones in the design process while consistently reexamining previous concepts and design steps as you move forward in determining the best approach to solve a problem.  At the end of this unit, you will have gone through an entire design project and will have produced a final design report and prepared a presentation of your work and design decision-making.

Unit 3 Time Advisory
The general coursework in this unit will take you approximately 9.25 hours to complete. Note that the assessment work in this unit will take you at least 117 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 3.1: 2.25 hours

 

☐    Subunit 3.1.1: 0.25 hours

☐    Activity: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 3.1.2: 0.75 hours

☐    Subunit 3.1.3: 0.25 hours

☐    Subunit 3.1.4: 0.5 hours

☐    Assessment: 10 hours

☐    Subunit 3.1.5: 0.5 hours

 

☐    Assessment: 5 hours

 

☐    Subunit 3.2: 1.5 hours

 

☐    Assessment: 10 hours

 

☐    Subunit 3.3: 2.5 hours

 

☐    Subunit 3.3.1: 0.75 hours

☐    Subunit 3.3.2: 0.75 hours

☐    Subunit 3.3.3: 1 hour

 

☐    Assessment: 45 hours

 

☐    Subunit 3.4: 3 hours

 

☐    Subunit 3.4.1: 1.25 hours

☐    Subunit 3.4.2: 1.75 hours

☐    Assessment: 45 hours

Unit3 Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this unit, the student will be able to: - Apply problem-identification stages involved in design. - Brainstorm, draw, model, and simulate engineering designs. - Apply customer requirements, initial research, design specifications, and manufacturing resource planning involved in product design. - Apply design refinement, and take design decisions into consideration when designing a product. - Test, validate, and evaluate designs. - Optimize designs through continuous improvement, cost reduction, and other quality-management techniques.

3.1 Planning the Design   3.1.1 Problem Identification   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation’s “Project Selection” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Project Selection” (PDF)

 Instructions: Read the activity and move forward with your choice
of a suitable project.  This activity should take approximately 2
hours to complete.  

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  • Reading: The University of Alabama: Dr. Jeff Jackson’s “Defining the Problem” Link: The University of Alabama: Dr. Jeff Jackson’s “Defining the Problem” (HTML)

    Instructions: The first step in any design is identifying a problem that needs solving.  Problems can be identified internally by an engineer seeing something in his or her life that needs fixing, or they can be introduced externally by an individual or entity that has a specific problem at hand.  This reading presents a short look at how problems can be identified.  Please read pages 7 through 10 of the slides.  This reading should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

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3.1.2 Customer Requirements   - Reading: University of Minnesota: Dr. Brad Bohlmann’s “Determining Customer Needs” Link: University of Minnesota: Dr. Brad Bohlmann’s “Determining Customer Needs” (PDF)

 Instructions: This reading introduces you to the various aspects of
customer requirements that are important for design.  Please click
the “Customer Needs” link located under the Spring 2012 Lecture
Notes heading and read the entire PDF.  This reading should take
approximately 45 minutes to complete.  

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3.1.3 Initial Research   - Reading: The University of Alabama: Dr. Jeff Jackson’s “Conducting Research” Link: The University of Alabama: Dr. Jeff Jackson’s “Conducting Research” (HTML)

 Instructions: This reading introduces you to aspects of initial
research as one of the steps in design.  It is important to
recognize what technology and potential solutions currently exist
before engaging in your own design, and independent research is the
means of learning of them.  Please read pages 11 through 14.  This
reading should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.  

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3.1.4 Design Specifications   - Reading: University of Minnesota: Dr. Sue Mantell’s “Developing Product Design Specifications” Link: University of Minnesota: Dr. Sue Mantell’s “Developing Product Design Specifications” (PDF)

 Instructions: This reading is an introduction to how to establish
the target requirements of a design through the use of metrics,
competitive benchmarking, and the establishment of target values. 
Please click the “Developing Product Design Specifications” link
located under the Spring 2012 Lecture Notes heading and read the
entire PDF.  This reading should take approximately 30 minutes to
complete.  

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  • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Determining Design Specifications” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Determining Design Specifications” (PDF)

    Instructions: Read the assessment and response guidelines and then develop a set of design specifications based on the needs of the project.  This assessment should take approximately 10 hours to complete. When you are finished, check your work against The Saylor Foundation’s “Determining Design Specifications - Guide to Responding” (PDF).

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3.1.5 Statement of Work   - Reading: University of Minnesota: Dr. Brad Bohlmann’s “Statement of Work” Link: University of Minnesota: Dr. Brad Bohlmann’s “Statement of Work” (PDF)

 Instructions: This reading will instruct you on how to develop a
Statement of Work.  The Statement of Work defines what you are
expecting to do with your application of engineering design.  It
serves as the framework for your design work, keeping you directed
down a specific path.  It is the culmination of identifying a
problem, looking into the needs and wants of your customer(s), and
establishing the design specifications to achieve your goals. 
Please click the “Statement of Work” link located under the Spring
2012 Lecture Notes heading and read the entire PDF.  This reading
should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.  

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  • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Statement of Work” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Statement of Work” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Read the assessment and response guidelines and then establish a time management plan and statement of your intended project scope and breadth. This assessment should take approximately 5 hours to complete. When you are finished, check your work against The Saylor Foundation’s “Statement of Work – Guide to Responding” (PDF).
     
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3.2 Design Concept Generation   - Reading: University of Minnesota: Dr. Brad Bohlmann’s “Concept Generation” Link: University of Minnesota: Dr. Brad Bohlmann’s “Concept Generation” (PDF)

 Instructions: This reading introduces you to concept generation and
the purpose of brainstorming to help develop ideas during the design
process.  Please click the “Concept Generation” link located under
the Spring 2012 Lecture Notes heading and read the entire PDF.  This
reading should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.  

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  • Reading: University of Minnesota: Dr. Barry Matthew Kudrowitz’s “Innovation & Brainstorming” Link: University of Minnesota: Dr. Barry Matthew Kudrowitz’s “Innovation & Brainstorming” (PDF)

    Instructions: This reading goes into more depth on various brainstorming methods and techniques.  Please click the “Innovation & Brainstorming” link located under the Spring 2012 Lecture Notes heading and read the entire PDF.  This reading should take approximately 60 minutes to complete.

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  • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Design Brainstorming” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Design Brainstorming” (PDF)

    Instructions: Read the assessment and response guidelines and begin brainstorming potential design directions to achieve your statement of work.  This assessment should take approximately 10 hours to complete.  When you are finished, check your work against The Saylor Foundation’s “Design Brainstorming – Guide to Responding” (PDF).

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3.3 Design Screening   3.3.1 Concept Selection   - Reading: University of Minnesota: Dr. Brad Bohlmann’s “Concept Selection” Link: University of Minnesota: Dr. Brad Bohlmann’s “Concept Selection” (PDF)
 
Instructions: This reading provides an overview of how to select a design concept to move forward with design evaluation.  This process, in conjunction with concept generation and design evaluation, is an iterative, nonlinear process. Please click the “Concept Selection” link located under the Spring 2012 Lecture Notes heading and read the entire document.  This reading should take approximately 45 minutes to complete.
 
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3.3.2 Estimation and Modeling   - Reading: University of Minnesota: Dr. Brad Bohlmann’s “Estimation and Modeling” Link: University of Minnesota: Dr. Brad Bohlmann’s “Estimation and Modeling” (PDF)

 Instructions: This reading will help you understand how to apply
estimation and modeling to aid in design.  Estimations and models
will help in determining how various concepts meet established needs
and guidelines, and are thus important in both the design screening
and design analysis stages.  Please click the “Estimation and
Modeling” link located under the Spring 2010 Lecture Notes section
and read the entire document.  This reading should take
approximately 45 minutes to complete.  

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3.3.3 Structural Design Optimization   - Reading: MIT: Dr. Olivier de Weck’s “Design Optimization” Link: MIT: Dr. Olivier de Weck’s “Design Optimization” (PDF)

 Instructions: This reading examines structural design
optimization.  Design optimization, being a continuously implemented
aspect of the engineering design process, is important in the
screening and selection of design concepts.  Please click on “PDF 1”
in Lecture 6, titled “L6: Manufacturing and Testing,” and read the
entire PDF.  This reading should take approximately 60 minutes to
complete.  

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  • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Design Screening and Midstream Report” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Design Screening and Midstream Report” (PDF)

    Instructions: Read the assessment and response guidelines and then go forward with establishing a design solution that will allow for prototyping and design validation in the next project phase.  Afterward, develop an encompassing design report that details your design-project work thus far.  You should plan to spend at least 45 hours on this assessment, although students typically devote as much as 150 hours to its completion. When you are finished, you can check your work against The Saylor Foundation’s “Design Screening and Midstream Report – Guide to Responding” (PDF).

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3.4 Design Implementation and Analysis   3.4.1 Prototyping and Modeling   - Reading: Stanford University: Dr. Andrea Goldsmith’s “Models and Prototypes” Link: Stanford University: Dr. Andrea Goldsmith’s “Models and Prototypes” (PowerPoint)

 Instructions: This reading introduces you to using models and
prototypes for design evaluation.  Please click on Lecture 6, titled
“Models and Prototypes,” and read the entire document.  This reading
should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.  

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  • Reading: University of Minnesota: Dr. Tom Chase’s “Prototyping” Link: University of Minnesota: Dr. Tom Chase’s “Prototyping” (HTML)

    Instructions: This reading provides a deeper look at how to use prototypes for design evaluation.  Please click the “Prototyping” link located under the Fall 2008 Lecture Notes section, which will take you to a webpage with a list of links.  Each link is a single slide, although if you click the first link, “Title Slide,” you can access each additional slide in order.  Please read the entire document.  This reading should take approximately 45 minutes to complete.

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3.4.2 Design Evaluation   - Reading: University of Minnesota: Dr. David Pui and Brad Bohlmann’s “Evaluating Your Design” Link: University of Minnesota: Dr. David Pui and Brad Bohlmann’s “Evaluating Your Design” (PDF)

 Instructions: This reading provides an overview of how to evaluate
a design after screening.  This process, in conjunction with concept
generation and design screening, is an iterative, nonlinear
process.  Please click the “Evaluating Your Design” link located
under the Spring 2010 Lecture Notes section and read pages 3 through
47.  This reading should take approximately 75 minutes to
complete.  

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  • Reading: The University of Alabama: Dr. Jeff Jackson’s “Engineering Test and Validation” Link: The University of Alabama: Dr. Jeff Jackson’s “Engineering Test and Validation” (HTML)

    Instructions: This reading provides further information on how to perform design testing and validation of prototypes to make sure the design performs up to expectations.  Please read the entire document.  This reading should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

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  • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Project Validation and Final Report” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Project Validation and Final Report” (PDF)

    Instructions: Read the assessment and response guidelines and then go forward with validating your design solution through prototyping and testing.  Afterward, develop a comprehensive design report that details your design project and your final thoughts on any future steps that should be taken.  You should plan to spend at least 45 hours on this assessment, although students typically devote as much as 150 hours to its completion.  When you are finished, check your work against The Saylor Foundation’s “Project Validation and Final Report – Guide to Responding” (PDF).

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