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ME103: Thermodynamics

Unit 1: Introduction to Thermodynamics   We will begin by taking a look at important thermodynamic concepts and terminology that you will use throughout the course.  We will use what are known as systems to define our realms of analysis.  A thermodynamic system is any bounded area that we place under observation.  Systems come in a number of variations.  If, for example, mass is not allowed to enter or exit the region under examination, the system is considered a “closed” system.  If mass is allowed to transfer across the boundaries of the area, however, it is an “open” system.
           
This unit will also define and examine thermodynamic properties and states and review common units, relationships, and conversions that you will need to recognize and perform in this course.  For example, how do you define pressure?  How can we make conversions between SI and USCS units?  You may be familiar with some or all of these; if this is the case, use this section as a refresher. 

Unit 1 Time Advisory
This unit will take you approximately 15 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 1.1: 5 hours

☐    Subunit 1.1.1: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 1.1.2: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 1.2: 5 hours

☐    Subunit 1.2.1: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 1.2.2: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 1.2.3: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 1.3: 5 hours

Unit1 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:
- Identify properties and states of a system. - Identify and use units as well as perform unit conversions. - Define the terms “systems,” “process,” and “cycle.”

1.1 Thermodynamic Concepts   1.1.1 Systems, Properties, and States   - Reading: Queen’s University: Canada: Professor G. Ciccarelli’s Lecture Notes on Applied Thermodynamics: “Lecture 1: Introduction to Thermodynamics” Link: Queen's Universtiy: Professor G. Ciccarelli’s Lecture Notes on Applied Thermodynamics: “Lecture 1: Introduction to Thermodynamics” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please download the PDF files for Lecture 1 and read
pages 1-12.  Can the boundary of a system change in size or shape as
the system undergoes changes?  
    
 Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the
kind permission of G. Ciccarelli, and can be viewed in its original
form [here](http://me.queensu.ca/Courses/230/LectureNotes.html).  Please
note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced
in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright
holder. 
  • Lecture: MIT OpenCourseWare: Professors Nelson and Bawendi’s Thermodynamics and Kinetics video lecture “State of a System, 0th Law, Equation of State” Link: MIT OpenCourseWare: Professors Nelson and Bawendi’s Thermodynamics and Kinetics video lecture “State of a System, 0th Law, Equation of State” (YouTube)

    Also available in:
    iTunes U
    Adobe Flash or HTML Transcript

    Instructions: Please watch this video (46:45 minutes), which will introduce you to the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics.

    Terms of Use: Nelson, Keith A. and Moungi Bawendi. 5.60 Thermodynamics & Kinetics, Spring 2008. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare). http://ocw.mit.edu (accessed March 11, 2011). License: Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike. The original version can be found here.   

  • Reading: University of Notre Dame: Professor J. M. Powers’ Lecture Notes on Thermodynamics: “Chapter 1: Introduction to Thermodynamics” Link: University of Notre Dame: Professor J. M. Powers’ Lecture Notes on Thermodynamics: “Chapter 1: Introduction to Thermodynamics” (PDF)
     
    Instructions:  Please read pages 1–15.  The reading will provide you with some historical perspective on the field of thermodynamics.  Who is recognized as the first thermal engineer and invented the first steam engine?  What do you think the most important historical milestones in the study of thermodynamics?
     
    Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 (HTML) license.  You can find the original Notre Dame version of this article here (PDF) Please click on “course notes” and download the PDF files for the lecture notes.

1.1.2 Process and Cycle   - Reading: Queen’s University: Canada: Professor G. Ciccarelli’s Lecture Notes on Applied Thermodynamics: “Lecture 1: Introduction to Thermodynamics” Link: Queen’s University, Canada: Professor G. Ciccarelli’s Lecture Notes on Applied Thermodynamics: “Lecture 1: Introduction to Thermodynamics” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please download the PDF files for Lectures 1-2 and
read page 13.  This reading will introduce you to the concepts of
process and cycle in thermodynamics.  
    
 Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the
kind permission of G. Ciccarelli, and can be viewed in its original
form [here](http://me.queensu.ca/Courses/230/LectureNotes.html).  Please
note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced
in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright
holder. 
  • Reading: University of Notre Dame: Professor J. M. Powers’ Lecture Notes on Thermodynamics: “Chapter 2: Some Concepts and Definitions” Link: University of Notre Dame: Professor J. M. Powers’ Lecture Notes on Thermodynamics: “Chapter 1: Introduction to Thermodynamics” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Please read section 2.4 and browse through the rest of Chapter 2.  What is meant by surrounding and universe?  What is a static process?  How do you define a reversible process?
     
    Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 (HTML) license.  You can find the original Notre Dame version of this article here (PDF) Please click on “course notes” and download the PDF files for the lecture notes.

1.2 Units and Conversions   - Web Media: Texas A&M; University: Dr. Ann Kenimer’s “Fundamental Concepts: Units” Link: Texas A&M University: Dr. Ann Kenimer’s “Fundamental Concepts: Units” (PDF)

 Instructions: In this subunit, you will learn about units of
measurements.  A comprehensive and thorough understanding of the
units of measurements of the physical quantities and properties
commonly encountered in mechanical engineering is essential to the
study of thermodynamics.  From the link above, click on “4.
 Fundamental Concepts Units Powerpoint,” Under Subsection C.  You
will be directed to a PDF version of a PowerPoint presentation by
Dr. Ann Kenimer of Texas A&M that covers units and unit
conversions.  Please read through all of the slides in the
presentation.  Note that this reading will cover the material you
need to know for subunits 1.2.1–1.2.3.  
    
 After reading, list three base units and five derived commonly
derived properties.  What is a bar?  Which units are named after
famous physicists?  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Web Media: MIT: Dr. Craig Counterman’s “Unit Converter” Link: MIT: Dr. Craig Counterman’s “Unit Converter” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Use the unit converter to test your ability to convert SI units to USCS units for density, pressure, volume, and energy.  What are the SI prefixes for 10-3, 106, 1012 ?

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.1 SI and USCS Units   Note: This subunit is covered by the web media assigned beneath subunit 1.2.  Focus specifically on slides 5, 6, 9, and 10.  You will learn about the International System of Units  (SI) and the U.S. Customary System of Units (UCSU).

1.2.2 Units of Properties   Note: This subunit is covered by the web media assigned beneath subunit 1.2.  Focus specifically on slides 7, 8, and 11.  You will learn about the* *the derived units for pressure, velocity, energy, and so forth.

1.2.3 Unit Conversions   Note: This subunit is covered by the web media assigned beneath subunit 1.2.  Focus specifically on slides 12 and 13.  You will learn about the  conversion between the International System of Units (SI) and the U.S. Customary System of Units (UCSU).

1.3 Unit 1 Assessments   - Assessment: University of South Florida's Dr. Carlos A. Smith’s “Thermodynamics: Homework A – Set 1” Link: University of South Florida: Dr. Carlos A. Smith’s “Thermodynamics: Homework A – Set 1” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Please attempt all questions in the assessment. You can find the answers here (PDF).
 
Terms of Use: This resource is used with the kind permission of Dr. Carlos A. Smith. To view the original assessment on the University of South Florida's website click here (HTML).

  • Assessment: McGraw Hill: Yunus A. Çengel and Michael A. Boles’ Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach, 4/e: “Multiple Choice Quiz for Chapter 1” Link: McGraw Hill: Yunus A. Çengel and Michael A. Boles’ Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach, 4/e: “Multiple Choice Quiz for Chapter 1” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above and answer all 10 questions in the quiz.  Select your answer from choices given for each question.  Click on “Submit Answers” at the bottom of the webpage when you have answered all the questions.  The webpage will tell you whether your answer is correct and what the correct answer is.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 1 Assessment” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 1 Assessment” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above and download the assessment. Work through all problems and write down your answers.  Read the instructions for each problem carefully.  Once you complete the assessment, compare your answers with the "Guide to Responding” (PDF).  This assessment will cover all topics discussed in Unit 1.