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MA233: Elementary Number Theory

Unit 1: Prime Numbers   One of the greatest mathematicians of all time, C. F. Gauss, remarked that “Mathematics is the queen of the sciences, and number theory is the queen of mathematics”; we would modify this only by adding that, “prime numbers are the queen of number theory.” Indeed, the major goal of this unit is to introduce you to the prime numbers, a powerful tool that we rely on repeatedly throughout the course. We have no doubt that, as you close the metaphorical book on the final unit, you will agree with our addendum to Gauss’s observation.
 
As this is a theoretical course, we are interested more in precision and properties than in computation. It is very easy to be led astray by vague notions – historically, incorrect assertions in number theory are due precisely to this fact – so we need to make our ideas precise. You will find much of the material in the first two sections familiar, as you have seen them in MA111 and MA231. By and large, the numbers that we study in elementary number theory are those obtainable by performing simple operations on the integers, so we start with a review of the structure of the integers: their ring properties, their orderings, and mathematical induction. The property of being prime, called primality, is related to factorization, which is related to divisibility. This requires us to precede our investigation of primality with a precise investigation of what it means to divide two integers; it may surprise you that, in this course, we almost never pay attention to the quotient, but focus instead on the remainder.
 
With the review out of the way, we turn to the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic, which states that every integer larger than 2 can be written as a product of prime numbers in exactly one way. We show this in two different ways, then take a look at the question, “Just how many primes are there, anyway?” It turns out that there are infinitely many, but whether this is more interesting than the reason why is debatable. Mathematicians like to say that if God had a book that contained the most elegant proofs ever written, Euclid’s solution to this question would surely take its place among them. We also ask, “How many prime numbers can we find, up to a certain size?” Alas, a proof would take us beyond elementary number theory, so we omit it – but the result is still worth discussing.

Unit1 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
- identify the properties of a ring; - distinguish some orderings as linear or well; - identify and prove patterns in important sequences of numbers, such as triangular numbers, square numbers, and Fibonacci numbers; - recognize the Golden Ratio and its importance to Fibonacci and Lucas numbers; - define prime numbers, and identify important properties; - explain why there are infinitely many prime numbers; and - apply the Sieve of Eratosthenes to identify prime numbers.

1.1 Integers and Induction   1.1.1 Ring Properties of the Integers   - Reading: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Chapter 1: Introduction and Section 1.1: Algebraic Operations with Integers” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Chapter 1: Introduction and Section 1.1: Algebraic Operations with Integers” (PDF)

 Instructions: A **ring** is a set with two operations, addition and
multiplication, that satisfy the ordinary rules of addition and
multiplication. Read the introduction to chapter 1 and “Section 1.1:
Algebraic Operations with Integers” on pages 7–10 to re-familiarize
yourself with the properties of these operations. Despite its
familiarity, don't rush through it.  

 Reading these sections and taking notes should take approximately
15 minutes.
  • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Justification that the Additive Inverse of any Element Is Unique” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Justification that the Additive Inverse of any Element Is Unique” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: This first assessment gives a gentle introduction. We have outlined a proof that the additive inverse of any element of a ring is unique. This proof applies not only to the integers, but to any ring. We have left some spaces blank. Fill in those spaces with the appropriate property listed in the reading. You need not be quite so pedantic when completing most of the assessments in this course, but the problem itself illustrates how often we glide over the seemingly obvious and why you should try to be careful when doing assessments like these.
     
    Completing this assessment should take approximately 15 minutes.

  • Assessment: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Rings and Fields Exercise” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Rings and Fields Exercise” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Try to do Exercise 1 on page 10.
     
    After attempting Exercise 1 assigned above, discuss your solution in the course discussion forum. Feel free to respond to other students’ postings as well. If you haven’t already done so, you will need to create a free account at the link above to participate in the discussions.

    Completing this assignment should take approximately 15 minutes.

1.1.2 Well Orderings   - Reading: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 1.2.1: The Well Ordering Principle” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 1.2.1: The Well Ordering Principle” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read “Section 1.2.1: The Well Ordering Principle” on page 11.
 
Reading this section and taking notes should take less than 15 minutes.

1.1.3 Mathematical Induction   - Reading: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 1.2.2: The Pigeonhole Principle and Section 1.2.3: The Principle of Mathematical Induction” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 1.2.2: The Pigeonhole Principle and Section 1.2.3: The Principle of Mathematical Induction” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read “Section 1.2.2: The Pigeonhole Principle” and “Section 1.2.3: The Principle of Mathematical Induction” on pages 11–14.
 
Reading these sections, taking notes, and studying the examples should take approximately 15 minutes.

  • Assessment: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Mathematical Induction Exercises” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Mathematical Induction Exercises” (PDF)

    Instructions: Try to do Exercises 3 and 6 on page 14.
     
    After attempting Exercises 3 and 6 assigned above, discuss your solutions in the course discussion forum. Feel free to respond to other students’ postings as well. If you haven’t already done so, you will need to create a free account at the link above to participate in the discussions.
     
    Completing this assessment should take between 15 minutes and 1 hour, depending on your comfort level with the material.

1.1.4 Geometric Numbers   - Reading: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 3.1: Geometric Numbers” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 3.1: Geometric Numbers” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read “Section 3.1: Geometric Numbers” on pages 57–59.
 
Reading this section, taking notes, and studying the examples should take approximately 15 minutes.

  • Assessment: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Geometric Number Exercises” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Geometric Number Exercises” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Try to do Exercises 1 and 2 on page 59.
     
    After attempting Exercises 1 and 2 assigned above, discuss your solutions in the course discussion forum. Feel free to respond to other students’ postings as well. If you haven’t already done so, you will need to create a free account at the link above to participate in the discussions.
     
    Completing this assessment should take less than 30 minutes.

1.2 The Division Algorithm   1.2.1 Integer Divisibility   - Reading: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 1.3.1: Integer Divisibility” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 1.3.1: Integer Divisibility” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read “Section 1.3.1: Integer Divisibility” on pages 15-16.
 
Reading this section, taking notes, and studying the examples should take less than 15 minutes.

  • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Theorem 4: Sketch of Proof of Equation (1.6)” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Theorem 4: Sketch of Proof of Equation (1.6)” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Use induction to show that equation (1.6) on page 16 of An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory is true. You can use the sketch of the proof, provided at the link.

  • Assessment: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Divisibility Exercises” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Divisibility Exercises” (PDF)

    Instructions: Try to do Exercises 1, 4, 6, 7, 11, and 12 on pages 17-18. For 6 and 7, use the forms of even and odd numbers given in Example 3 on page 15.

    After attempting the divisibility exercises assigned above, discuss your solutions in the course discussion forum. Feel free to respond to other students’ postings as well. If you haven’t already done so, you will need to create a free account at the link above to participate in the discussions.

    Completing this assessment should take approximately 30 minutes, depending on your comfort level with the material.

1.2.2 The Division Algorithm   - Reading: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 1.3.2: The Division Algorithm” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 1.3.2: The Division Algorithm” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read “Section 1.3.2: The Division Algorithm” on pages 16–17.
 
Reading this section and taking notes should take less than 15 minutes.

  • Assessment: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Division Algorithm Exercises” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Division Algorithm Exercises” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Try to do Exercises 2 and 3 on page 17.
     
    After attempting the division algorithm exercises assigned above, discuss your solutions in the course discussion forum. Feel free to respond to other students’ postings as well. If you haven’t already done so, you will need to create a free account at the link above to participate in the discussions.
     
    Completing this assessment should take approximately 15 minutes.

  • Assessment: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Divisibility Exercises 5 and 8” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Divisibility Exercises 5 and 8” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Try to do Exercises 5 and 8 on page 17. It will help to divide this problem into three cases, organized by the remainder of division of m by 3. For each case, write m in a form similar to that used in Example 3 for even and odd numbers.
     
    After attempting the divisibility exercises assigned above, discuss your solutions in the course discussion forum. Feel free to respond to other students’ postings as well. If you haven’t already done so, you will need to create a free account at the link above to participate in the discussions.
     
    Completing this assessment should take approximately 15 minutes.

1.3 Definition and Characterization of a Prime Number   1.3.1 Definition via Divisibility (Traditional Definition) and the Sieve of Eratosthenes   - Reading: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 2.1: The Sieve of Eratosthenes” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 2.1: The Sieve of Eratosthenes” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read “Section 2.1: The Sieve of Eratosthenes” on pages 35–37.
 
Reading this section, taking notes, and studying the examples should take approximately 15 minutes.

  • Assessment: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - The Sieve of Eratosthenes Exercises” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - The Sieve of Eratosthenes Exercises” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Try to do Exercises 1, 3, and 4 on page 37. Exercise 3 can be resolved by a factorization formula. To best use the hint for Exercise 4, try proving the contrapositive.
     
    After attempting the exercises assigned above, discuss your solutions in the course discussion forum. Feel free to respond to other students’ postings as well. If you haven’t already done so, you will need to create a free account at the link above to participate in the discussions.
     
    Completing this assessment should take approximately 15 minutes.

1.3.2 Definition via Division (Euclid’s Criterion)   - Reading: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 2.2: Alternate Definition of Prime Number” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 2.2: Alternate Definition of Prime Number” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read “Section 2.2: Alternate Definition of Prime Number” on pages 38–39.
 
Reading this section, taking notes, and studying the examples should take approximately 15 minutes.

1.4 Prime Numbers Are the Building Blocks of Integers!   1.4.1 The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic: Traditional Proof   - Reading: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 2.4: Introduction and Section 2.4.1: The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 2.4: Introduction and Section 2.4.1: The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read the introduction to “Section 2.4” on page 41, and “Section 2.4.1: The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic” on pages 41–44.

 Reading these sections, taking notes, and studying the examples
should take approximately 15 minutes.
  • Assessment: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Prime Factorization Exercises” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Prime Factorization Exercises” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Try to do Exercises 1, 2, and 3 on page 46.
     
    After attempting the prime factorization exercises assigned above, discuss your solutions in the course discussion forum. Feel free to respond to other students’ postings as well. If you haven’t already done so, you will need to create a free account at the link above to participate in the discussions.
     
    Completing this assessment should take approximately 30 minutes.

1.4.2 Sage Lab: Introduction to Sage   - Web Media: The Sage Foundation’s “The Sage Notebook” Link: The Sage Foundation’s “The Sage Notebook” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Visit The Sage Notebook website, create an account for yourself. To create an account you will need to click on the Google, Yahoo!, or OpenID buttons.
 
After you’ve created an account, go to the Sage guided tour found here and work through the following sections:

-   [Assignment, Equality, and
    Arithmetic](http://www.sagemath.org/doc/tutorial/tour_assignment.html)
-   [Getting
    Help](http://www.sagemath.org/doc/tutorial/tour_help.html)
-   [Functions, Indentation, and
    Counting](http://www.sagemath.org/doc/tutorial/tour_help.html)
-   [Basic Algebra and
    Calculus](http://www.sagemath.org/doc/tutorial/tour_algebra.html)
    (Stop once you get to “Solving Differential equations.”)
-   [Plotting](http://www.sagemath.org/doc/tutorial/tour_plotting.html)
-   [Some Common Issues with
    Functions](http://www.sagemath.org/doc/tutorial/tour_functions.html)
-   [Basic
    Rings](http://www.sagemath.org/doc/tutorial/tour_rings.html)
-   [Linear
    Algebra](http://www.sagemath.org/doc/tutorial/tour_linalg.html)
    (Stop once you get to “Matrix spaces.”)

Creating an account, reading through the guided tour, and taking
notes should take approximately 2 hours.  

 This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
Unported License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).
Attributions can be found
[here](http://sagemath.org/development-ack.html).

1.5 How Many Prime Numbers Are There? Absolute and Relative Measures   1.5.1 There Are Infinitely Many Primes   - Reading: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 2.3: The infinitude of Primes” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 2.3: The infinitude of Primes” (PDF)

 Instructions: Read “Section 2.3: The Infinitude of Primes” on pages
39-40.  

 Reading this section, taking notes, and studying the examples
should take approximately 5 minutes.
  • Assessment: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - The Infinitude of Primes Exercises” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - The Infinitude of Primes Exercises” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Try to do Exercises 1, 3, and 4 on pages 40-41.

    After attempting the exercises assigned above, discuss your solutions in the course discussion forum. Feel free to respond to other students’ postings as well. If you haven’t already done so, you will need to create a free account at the link above to participate in the discussions.

    Completing this assessment should take approximately 30 minutes.

1.5.2 Sage Lab: “Relatively Speaking, How Many Primes Are There?”   - Web Media: The Saylor Foundation’s “Sage Lab: Relatively Speaking, How Many Primes Are There?” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Sage Lab: Relatively Speaking, How Many Primes Are There?” (Sage)

 Instructions: Download the linked set of labs. Upload the first one
(1.5.2-SageWS1.sws) to the Sage website where you created an account
(subunit 1.4.2). Work through the lab, trying to guess a formula for
π(*x*).  

 Completing this assignment should take approximately 15 minutes.

1.5.3 The Prime Number Theorem (Without Proof) and Some Famous Conjectures Regarding Prime Numbers   - Reading: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 2.8: Theorems and Conjectures Involving Prime Numbers” Link: Wissam Raji’s “An Introductory Course in Elementary Number Theory - Section 2.8: Theorems and Conjectures Involving Prime Numbers” (PDF)

 Instructions: Read “Section 2.8: Theorems and Conjectures Involving
Prime Numbers” on pages 54-56.  

 Reading this section, taking notes, and studying the examples
should take less than 15 minutes.