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K12ELA011: English Language Arts 11

Unit 7: Exploring Freedom: The Modern Era   Now that all men and women were recognized as free and equal, there was nothing holding one back from achieving the American Dream, right? Wrong. Our nation was about to experience two setbacks of epic proportions: World War I and the Great Depression. With our nation’s morale and pocketbooks at an all-time low, people began to question whether the American Dream was nothing more than a fairy tale. People were beginning to realize that the promises of equality and opportunity were not always realized. This sentiment was expressed in modern literature in a variety of ways, both subtly and blatantly. In this unit, we will explore the ideas of notable modernist authors as well as the literary techniques they employed to express them. 

Unit 7 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take you approximately 42 hours and 45 minutes.

☐    Subunit 7.1: 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 7.2: 42 hours and 15 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 7.2.1: 2 hours

        ☐    Subunit 7.2.2: 4 hours and 30 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 7.2.3: 2 hours

        ☐    Subunit 7.2.4: 1 hour and 15 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 7.2.5: 7 hours and 15 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 7.2.6: 10 hours and 15 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 7.2.7: 15 hours

Unit7 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
- Identify and analyze the predominant themes of modernist literature in America.
  - Analyze the use and effect of poetry elements such as imagery, similes, metaphors, narratives, rhythm, meter, structure, and effect.
  - Analyze the use and effect of short story elements such as stream of consciousness, irony, point of view, characterization, and speaker.

Standards Addressed (Common Core):
- CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.7 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.7 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.8 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.9 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.7 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.10

7.1 Overview of the Modern Era   Having emerged from what some considered a barbaric time of slavery, suppression, and war, Americans now wanted to break free from the past. In order to do so, they embraced industry and technology in an effort to create a brighter future. Still, many of the values of the past generations became lost in this attempt to move away from times gone by. Thus, the modern era represents a time of experimentation. Like most experiments, there were successes and there were failures. 

  • Reading: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “Modernism and Experimentation: 1914 - 1945” Link: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “Modernism and Experimentation: 1914 - 1945”

    Instructions: Read this article about the modern era of American literature. Stop when you get to the section entitled “The Harlem Renaissance.” Take notes on the historical markers of this period as well as the characteristics of modern literature.
     
    Reading this article and taking notes should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

7.2 Poetry of the Modern Era   As Americans experimented with different ways of living and viewing the world, poets also experimented with different forms of expressing themselves. This resulted in one of the most vibrant periods of poetic expression in our nation’s history. 

  • Activity: EDSITEment!: “Aspects of Modernism” and “Lesson 1: Understanding the Context of Modernist Poetry” Link: EDSITEment!: “Aspects of Modernism” and “Lesson 1: Understanding the Context of Modernist Poetry”

    Instructions: Click on the first link, and follow the directions to complete the chart on page 1. Then, click on the second link and scroll down to view some of the differences between the pre-modern world and the modern world. Compare these answers to the ones you wrote on your chart.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: EDSITEment!: “Activity 1 - Identifying a Poem’s Speaker” Link: EDSITEment!: “Activity 1 - Identifying a Poem’s Speaker”

    Instructions: Complete activity 1. Be sure to click “Read the rest of the poem” for the full version.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: LibriVox: Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Sonnets from the Portuguese: “Sonnet 43: How Do I Love Thee?” Link: LibriVox: Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Sonnets from the Portuguese: “Sonnet 43: How Do I Love Thee?”

    Instructions: Listen to a reading of Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s “Sonnet 43: How Do I Love Thee.” Complete “Activity 1” from the previous resource using this poem.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: Brian Nation: Wallace Stevens’s “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird” Link: Brian Nation: Wallace Stevens’s “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird”
     
    Instructions: Read Wallace Stevens’s “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird.”
     
    Reading this poem should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Explanation: EDSITEment!: “Activity 2 - Thirteen Ways of Looking: Introducing Modernist Poetry” Link: EDSITEment!: “Activity 2 - Thirteen Ways of Looking: Introducing Modernist Poetry”

    Instructions: Scroll down to “Activity 2.” Read through the last bullet point of the activity, which lists, stanza by stanza, the characteristics of modern poetry as they are demonstrated throughout the poem.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: EDSITEment!: “Thirteen Ways Graphic Organizer” Link: EDSITEment!: “Thirteen Ways Graphic Organizer”

    Instructions: Follow the directions to complete the graphic organizer.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

7.2.1 “The Waste Land” by T. S. Eliot   - Explanation: Open Yale Courses: Langdon Hammer’s Modern Poetry/ENGL310: “Lecture 10 - T. S. Eliot” Link: Open Yale Courses: Langdon Hammer’s Modern Poetry/ENGL310: “Lecture 10 - T. S. Eliot”

 Instructions: Begin watching this lecture at 10:32. You will need
to keep this information in mind as you read Eliot’s works. You can
stop the video at 25:00.  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above. 
  • Reading: Project Gutenberg: T. S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land” and LibriVox: T. S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land” Link: Project Gutenberg: T. S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land” and LibriVox: T. S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land”
     
    Instructions: You may click on the first link to read or the second link to listen. If you choose to listen, you may click on the second link, and choose the preferred audio download. You may also choose to read along with the audio.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: Open Yale Courses: Langdon Hammer’s Modern Poetry/ENGL 310: “Lecture 11 - T. S. Eliot (cont.)” Link: Open Yale Courses: Langdon Hammer’s Modern Poetry/ENGL 310: “Lecture 11: T. S. Eliot (cont.)”

    Instructions: Start this video at 33:42. Listen to the lecture discussing an analysis of the poem.
     
    Watching this lecture and taking notes should take approximately 45 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: Wikispaces: Ms. Serrano’s “‘The Wasteland’ Study Questions” Link: Wikispaces: Ms. Serrano’s “‘The Wasteland’ Study Questions”

    Instructions: Open the first Microsoft Word document on the page. Answer each of the questions thoroughly, citing specific evidence from the text to support your answers.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

7.2.2 Poems by Robert Frost   7.2.2.1 “Birches”   - Reading: Project Gutenberg: Robert Frost’s “Birches” Link: Project Gutenberg: Robert Frost’s “Birches”

 Instructions: Scroll down to the table of contents and click on the
link to page 29. Read the text of “Birches” by Robert Frost. What is
your first response to the poem?  
    
 Reading this poem should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Web Media: LibriVox’s Short Poetry Collection 003: “Reading of ‘Birches’” Link: LibriVox’s Short Poetry Collection 003: “Reading of ‘Birches’”

    Instructions: Open the MP3 file to listen to a recording of the poem “Birches.” Does hearing the poem read aloud impact your understanding or response to it?
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: Wikispaces: Trish Puett’s “Frost Interpretations: Analysis of ‘Birches’” Link: Wikispaces: Trish Puett’s “Frost Interpretations: Analysis of ‘Birches’”

    Instructions: One of the beauties of poetry is that it can be read and interpreted in many different ways. Scroll halfway down the page to the paragraph under the picture of the tree. Read the author’s interpretation of the poem.

    • Do you think her analysis is a good one?
    • In what ways do you agree and disagree with this analysis?
    • Write your own brief interpretation of the poem, citing specific lines from the poem as the author has.

    Reading this selection and completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):
    - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.7

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: Imagery in Robert Frost’s “Birches” Link: Project Gutenberg: Robert Frost’s “Birches”

    Instructions: Recall the definition of imagery you learned in the activity entitled “Imagery” in subunit 1.2.2.2.1. Using what you know about imagery, take note of how Frost uses imagery in “Birches.” If you have a printer, print the text of the poem and highlight examples of imagery evident throughout the poem. If you don’t have a printer, make a written list of these examples.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Explanation: SOPHIA: Melissa Stephenson’s “Writing an Effective Thesis Statement” Link: SOPHIA: Melissa Stephenson’s “Writing an Effective Thesis Statement”

    Instructions: Watch the video, which explains how to write an effective thesis statement. Then, using what you’ve learned, write a thesis statement that answers the following question: How does Robert Frost use imagery in the poem “Birches?”
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

7.2.2.2 “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost   - Reading: LibriVox’s Short Poetry Collection 003: “The Road Not Taken” Link: LibriVox’s Short Poetry Collection 003: “The Road Not Taken”

 Instructions: Click on poem 17, “The Road Not Taken,” to listen to
the recording of the poem.  
    
 Listening to this poem should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Activity: TED: Kid President: “I Think We All Need a Pep Talk” Link: TED: Kid President: “I Think We All Need a Pep Talk”

    Instructions: Watch the video, listening carefully to the reference to Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken.” Why do you think the speaker references this poem? How does it help him convey his overall message?
     
    Watching this video should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

7.2.2.3 “Mending Wall” by Robert Frost   - Reading: EDSITEment!: “Robert Frost’s ‘Mending Wall’: A Marriage of Poetic Form and Content - Introduction” Link: EDSITEment!: “Robert Frost’s ‘Mending Wall’: A Marriage of Poetic Form and Content - Introduction”

 Instructions: You are about to read one of Robert Frost’s most
famous poems, “Mending Wall.” To get some background information
about the poem as well as what you will be learning in this subunit,
read the Introduction on this webpage.  
    
 Reading this material should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Project Gutenberg: Robert Frost’s North of Boston: “Mending Wall” Link: Project Gutenberg: Robert Frost’s North of Boston: “Mending Wall”

    Instructions: Read the text of Robert Frost’s “Mending Wall,” which is the first poem on the page. As you read, keep in mind that this is a narrative poem (i.e., a poem that tells a story). What is the story Frost is telling us? What is the message behind that story?
     
    Reading this poem should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: LibriVox: “Reading of ‘Mending Wall’ by Robert Frost” Link: LibriVox: “Reading of ‘Mending Wall’ by Robert Frost”

    Instructions: Open the audio file of Part I of Frost’s poetry collection entitled North of Boston. Listen to the reading of “The Mending Wall,” which is the first poem on the recording after the introduction and table of contents.
     
    Listening to this poem should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: TeacherTube: “‘Mending Wall’ by Robert Frost” Link: TeacherTube: “‘Mending Wall’ by Robert Frost”

    Instructions: Watch the video in its entirety, paying particular attention to the music in the background as well as the images presented alongside the verses of the poem. Do these added elements change your understanding of the poem? How do they add to the emotional impact of the poem?
     
    Watching this video should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: Wikispaces: EnglishIIIRockstars’s “‘Mending Wall’ Discussion Questions” Link: Wikispaces: EnglishIIIRockstars’s “‘Mending Wall’ Discussion Questions”

    Instructions: Scroll down to the section entitled “Frost - ‘Mending Wall’.” Click on the third link to open the Microsoft Word document. Answer the questions as thoroughly and specifically as possible, citing words and passages from the text as necessary.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

7.2.3 William Carlos Williams   - Explanation: Open Yale Courses: Langdon Hammer’s Modern Poetry/ENGL 310: “Lecture 16 - William Carlos Williams” Link: Open Yale Courses: “ENGL 310: Modern Poetry: Lecture 16: William Carlos Williams”

 Instructions: In this section, you will be introduced to one of the
most famous American modernist poets, William Carlos Williams. In
order to learn a little about this man and poet, listen to this
introduction to a lecture on Williams’s poetry. You can stop the
recording at 4:08.  
    
 Watching this lecture should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

7.2.3.1 William Carlos Williams’s “Danse Russe”   - Reading: EDSITEment!: “Seeing Sense in Photographs & Poems: Introduction” Link: EDSITEment!: “Seeing Sense in Photographs & Poems: Introduction”

 Instructions: Read the background information on the page to gain
some insight into what you will be studying in this subunit. Think
about the notion that a picture can be poetry and vice versa. Do you
agree? Write down some thoughts.  
    
 Reading this selection and completing this activity should take
approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Activity: EDSITEment!: “Seeing Sense in Photographs and Poems: Activity 1 - The Photo: Initial Impressions, Description, Exploration, and Revised Impressions”; “Worksheet 1 for ‘Seeing Sense’”; “Reference Photo (‘The Steerage’) for Activity 1” Link: EDSITEment!: “Seeing Sense in Photographs and Poems: Activity 1 - The Photo: Initial Impressions, Description, Exploration, and Revised Impressions”; “Worksheet 1 for ‘Seeing Sense’”; and WikimediaCommons: “Reference Photo (‘The Steerage’)”
     
    Instructions: In this activity, you will be developing an impression of “The Steerage” by locating and analyzing details of the photograph. Click on the first link and read the description of “Activity 1” to get a better idea of the kinds of details you should be looking for in the photo as well as the kinds of questions you should be asking yourself. Then, click on the second link to open the worksheet. Click on the third link to open the reference photo.
     
    Then use the worksheet and the photo to complete the first half of the worksheet. You can stop once you’ve written your revised impression. How did your opinion of the photograph change after analyzing the details?
     
    Completing these activities should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: EDSITEment!: “Seeing Sense in Photographs and Poems: Activity 2 - The Poem: Initial Impressions, Description, Exploration, and Revised Impressions”; “Worksheet 1 for ‘Seeing Sense’”; The Other Pages: William Carlos Williams’s “Danse Russe” Link: EDSITEment!: [“Seeing Sense in Photographs and Poems: Activity

    1. The Poem: Initial Impressions, Description, Exploration, and Revised Impressions”](http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/seeing-sense-photographs-poems#section-16164); “Worksheet 1 for ‘Seeing Sense’”; The Other Pages: William Carlos Williams’s “Danse Russe”

    Instructions: In this activity, you will be developing an impression of “Danse Russe” by William Carlos Williams by locating and analyzing details of the poem. Click on the first link and read the description of “Activity 2” to get a better idea of the kinds of details you should be looking for in the poem as well as the kinds of questions you should be asking yourself. Then, click on the second link to open the worksheet. Click on the third link to open the reference poem.
     
    Then use the worksheet and the poem to complete the second half of the worksheet. How did your opinion of the poem change after analyzing the details?
     
    Completing these activities should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):
    - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.4

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

7.2.3.2 William Carlos Williams’s “The Red Wheelbarrow”   7.2.4 “The Jilting of Granny Weatherall” by Katherine Anne Porter   - Reading: Morrisville State College: Katherine Ann Porter’s “The Jilting of Granny Weatherall” Link: Morrisville State College: Katherine Ann Porter’s “The Jilting of Granny Weatherall”

 Instructions: Read this short story.  
    
 Reading this story should take approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

7.2.4.1 Elements of a Short Story: Stream of Consciousness   - Activity: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Stream of Consciousness Narration” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Stream of Consciousness Narration”

 Instructions: Read each slide carefully to learn about stream of
consciousness, why it is used, and what effect it has on the reader.
Then pick out a sentence or two from “The Jilting of Granny
Weatherall” that you believe best demonstrate this literary
technique. What effect do you think stream of consciousness
narration has on the character and plot development of the story?  
    
 Viewing this slide presentation and completing this activity should
take approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.R.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/1)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

7.2.4.2 Elements of a Short Story: Theme   - Explanation: Next Vista for Learning: Mark Ooka’s “Introduction to Theme” Link: Next Vista for Learning: Mark Ooka’s “Introduction to Theme”

 Instructions: Watch the video, which discusses the concept of
theme. List a few of the themes in “The Jilting of Granny
Weatherall.”  
    
 Watching this video and taking notes should take approximately 15
minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.R.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

7.2.5 “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner   - Activity: Kelly Ratte’s “Pre - Reading Activity Anticipation Guide” Link: Kelly Ratte’s “Pre - Reading Activity Anticipation Guide”

 Instructions: Begin the pre-reading activity following the
instructions on the webpage. We will return to this page after you
read “A Rose for Emily” to complete the right side of the guide.  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Highline Community College: William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” Link: Highline Community College: William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily”

    Instructions: Read the entire text of “A Rose for Emily,” the first of three stories on this page.
     
    Reading this story should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: Kelly Ratte’s “Comprehension/Text Structure Activity” Link: Kelly Ratte’s “Comprehension/Text Structure Activity”

    Instructions: Answer the questions under each of the three sections on the page: “Initial Reaction,” “Reading Check,” and “Literary Analysis.” Ignore the page numbers beside certain questions, but if necessary, refer to the text of the story at the previous reading link.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

7.2.5.1 Elements of a Short Story: In Medias Res   - Activity: Kelly Ratte’s “In Medias Res Worksheet” Link: Kelly Ratte’s “In Medias Res Worksheet”

 Instructions: Scroll down to the section entitled “In Medias Res.”
Read the instructions, and click on the link to open the worksheet.
Once you’ve completed the timeline, return to the page and answer
the three questions regarding the effect medias res has on the
story.  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.R.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.R.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Explanation: UNC University Libraries: “Citing Information: MLA” Link: UNC University Libraries: “Citing Information: MLA”

    Instructions: In the next activity, you will be completing a research assignment. Before doing so, it is necessary to understand the document style used in literature and the humanities. That document style is called MLA. Click on the link, and use the tabs under “MLA” to navigate through the tutorial. Read through the information once, and then bookmark the webpage so that you can refer back to it when writing your paper.
     
    Reading this webpage should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: Kelly Ratte’s “After Reading Activities” Link: Kelly Ratte’s “After Reading Activities”

    Instructions: Read the assignment entitled “Investigating Health and Medicine.” Follow these directions to write a research paper about arsenic. Be sure to use at least four different sources, and try not to rely too heavily on any one source.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 5 hours.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

7.2.6 Ernest Hemingway’s “Three Shots”   - Reading: EDSITEment!: “‘Three Shots’: Ernest Hemingway’s Nick Adams - Background” Link: EDSITEment!: “‘Three Shots’: Ernest Hemingway’s Nick Adams - Background”

 Instructions: Read the background information at the link provided
to gain some contextual knowledge of both Ernest Hemingway and the
short story we are about to read, “Three Shots.”  
    
 Reading this material should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

7.2.7 This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald   - Reading: Project Gutenberg: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s This Side of Paradise and LibriVox: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s *This Side of Paradise* Link: Project Gutenberg: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s This Side of Paradise  and LibriVox: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s This Side of Paradise
 
Instructions: You may click on the first link to read or the second link to listen. If you choose to listen, you may click on the second link, and choose the preferred audio download. You may also choose to read along with the audio.
 
Reading this novel should take approximately 9 hours.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.R.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Activity: This Side of Paradise Research Paper Instructions: After reading This Side of Paradise, choose two themes in the novel and analyze how Fitzgerald develops these themes over the course of the novel. Your paper should be 3 - 5 pages in length and include references to at least three outside sources to support your argument. Please document these sources according to MLA guidelines.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 6 hours.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

Extension Resource   If any or all of the units you have studied in the course have ignited an interest in learning more, the following list will help you. It contains books and other resources you can use for further study. You will most likely be able to find many of these items in your local public library.

  • Reading: The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner The Sound and the Fury is written in stream-of-conscious style from a multi-narrative perspective. It tells the story of the members of the Compton family, who are struggling with financial hardships while attempting to maintain their reputation, morality, and faith in God. 

  • Reading: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby is set in the fictional city of West Egg on Long Island. A tragic tale of greed, adultery, and deception set during the Jazz Age, many critics believe it is a warning to readers about the pitfalls to avoid while pursuing the American dream. 

  • Reading: The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemmingway Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, The Old Man and the Sea is the tale of an elderly Cuban fisherman named Santiago who battles with a huge marlin in the Gulf Stream. Aside from being quite an adventure story, the novel is an intense character study full of symbolism and irony.