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K12ELA011: English Language Arts 11

Unit 6: Expanding Freedom: Literature from the Civil War and Women’s Suffrage   In our study of American literature thus far, we have explored the literature of those individuals with the freedom to express themselves openly* *-mostly white men. Up until this period in American history, not all citizens had this freedom; however, this was about to change. The Civil War and Women’s Suffrage Movement would finally open our country’s ears to the voices of those who had been marginalized for so long. In this unit, we will listen to those powerful voices from the past and honor their impressive contributions to the freedoms we all enjoy today.

Unit 6 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take you approximately 26 hours and 15 minutes.

☐    Subunit 6.1: 15 minutes

☐    Subunit 6.2: 7 hours

        ☐    Subunit 6.2.1: 6 hours and 45 minutes

☐    Subunit 6.3: 5 hours and 30 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 6.3.1: 15 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 6.3.2: 1 hour and 30 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 6.3.3: 2 hours and 45 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 6.3.4: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 6.4: 3 hours and 15 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 6.4.1: 30 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 6.4.2: 2 hours and 15 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 6.4.3: 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 6.5: 6 hours

        ☐    Subunit 6.5.1: 1 hour

        ☐    Subunit 6.5.2: 45 minutes

☐    Subunit 6.6: 4 hours and 15 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 6.6.1: 2 hours and 30 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 6.6.2: 30 minutes

Unit6 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
- Identify and analyze the predominant themes of Civil War literature in America.
  - Identify and analyze the effects of the unique elements of a narrative.
  - Write a narrative of personal events.
  - Identify and analyze the predominant themes of Women’s Suffrage literature in America.
  - Identify and analyze the effects of elements of a short story such as irony.
  - Annotate a text.

Standards Addressed (Common Core):
- CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.9 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.8 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.9 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.7 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.8 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.9 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.SL.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.SL.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.L.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.L.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.L.5

6.1 Civil War: Origins   As you learned in the last unit, the Civil War had a huge impact on the literature of the time. Prior to the war, readers had the luxury of entertaining fantasy and romantic notions. The war brought them back to reality, and the literature of the day followed suit. In order to understand the literature of this period in context, you need to have a cursory understanding of this unfortunate time period in American history. 

  • Reading: Boundless: “Origins of the War” Link: Boundless: “Origins of the War”

    Instructions: In order to better understand the issues that acted as catalysts for the Civil War, read this brief article. This will give you a better understanding of the mindset of the people who lived in this era, including authors and their characters.
     
    Reading this article should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.2 Literature from the Civil War   The Civil War period in American history was a somber and volatile time. The literature of the day reflected the realities and uncertainties of war. In this subunit, we’ll be looking at some examples of the prose that sprung from this era. 

  • Reading: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “The Rise of Realism (1860 - 1914)” Link: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “The Rise of Realism (1860 - 1914)”
     
    Instructions: In order to gain an understanding of the political and societal influences on the literature of the Civil War era in American history, read the introduction to the article taking notes on the key points. You may stop when you get to the section about Samuel Clemens.
     
    Reading this selection and taking notes should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.2.1 *Narrative of Sojourner Truth*   - Reading: University of Pennsylvania: A Celebration of Women Writers: The Narrative of Sojourner Truth and LibriVox: *The Narrative of Sojourner Truth* Link: University of Pennsylvania: A Celebration of Women Writers: The Narrative of Sojourner Truth  and LibriVox: The Narrative of Sojourner Truth
 
Instructions: You may click on the first link to read or the second link to listen. If you choose to listen, you may click on the second link, and choose the preferred audio download. You may also choose to read along with the audio. In any case, you should open the audio file to read the brief introduction to The Narrative of Sojourner Truth.
 
Reading this narrative should take approximately 4 hours and 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.R.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.2.1.1 Intro to Writing a Narrative   Now that you’ve read a slave narrative, it’s time to try your hand at writing a narrative of your own. Though your struggles and experiences may not be quite as dramatic as a slave’s, we all have important events in our lives worthy of sharing with others. 

  • Reading: SOPHIA: Dan Reade’s “Writing Narratives: Basics of the Narrative Essay” Link: SOPHIA: Dan Reade’s “Writing Narratives: Basics of the Narrative Essay”

    Instructions: In this unit, you will be writing a personal essay that brings an important event or experience to life. Read this tutorial explaining the basics of the narrative essay. Then, answer review questions 1 - 4 at the end of the chapter.
     
    Reading this tutorial and answering the questions should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.2.1.2 Planning your Personal Narrative   - Activity: ReadWriteThink: “Essay Map” Link: ReadWriteThink: “Essay Map”

 Instructions: In this unit, you will be writing your very own
personal narrative detailing an event or experience in your life
that shaped you into who you are today or inspired you to be a
better person. In order to plan out your essay, use this interactive
essay-mapping tool. Follow the prompts to complete the essay map.
Once you are finished, you should save your essay map so that you
can refer to it throughout the writing process. You may also print
your essay map if you wish so that you can have a paper copy to
refer to.  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.2.1.3 Elements of an Effective Personal Narrative: Setting   - Web Media: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Setting” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Setting”

 Instructions: This tutorial, which you first saw in Unit 5, is
about how to create an effective setting for a fictional story. The
same principles also apply to creating a setting in a personal
narrative.  
    
 You first saw this slideshow in Unit 5 when we discussed the
setting of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher.”
Review it now, and then either bookmark or download it to refer back
to as you begin writing your personal narrative.  
    
 Reviewing this tutorial should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3.b](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3/b)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.2.1.4 Elements of an Effective Personal Narrative: Descriptive Language   6.2.1.5 Elements of an Effective Personal Narrative: Dialogue   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Punctuating Dialogue” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Punctuating Dialogue”

 Instructions: As you write your personal narrative, you will be
incorporating dialogue in order to allow your reader into the story
and bring it to life. In order to do this effectively, you will need
to know the special rules of punctuation for dialogue. Read the
information on this page to learn these rules and bookmark it or
print it so that you can refer back to it as you begin writing your
narrative. Note also that there is an audio link at the bottom of
the page so that you can listen to the reading of the text on the
page as well.  
    
 Reading this article should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3.b](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3/b)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.2.1.6 Elements of an Effective Personal Narrative: Sensory and Figurative Language   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Dan Reade’s “Writing Narratives: Sensory and Figurative Language” Link: SOPHIA: Dan Reade’s “Writing Narratives: Sensory and Figurative Language”

 Instructions: Scroll down to the video entitled “Sensory and
Figurative Language.” As you watch the video, pay particular
attention to the examples the instructor uses to illustrate how to
use sensory and figurative language in a narrative essay. After you
finish the video, reflect on how you can use this technique in your
own personal narrative.  
    
 Watching this video should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3.b](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3/b)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3.d](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3/d)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.3 Writing Your Personal Narrative   Now that you’ve learned about the qualities of an effective and impactful personal narrative, it’s time to write your story. In this subunit, you’ll learn how to structure, draft, revise, and proofread your own personal narrative. 

6.3.1 Structure and Sequencing   Before you set out to write your personal narrative, you need to decide how you will structure it and the sequence in which you will reveal the events that take place. While some narratives follow a sequential structure in which the events unfold as they happen, others use a nonlinear structure. 

  • Explanation: SOPHIA: Ryan Howard’s “Writing Narratives” Link: SOPHIA: Ryan Howard’s “Writing Narratives”

    Instructions: Scroll down to the slideshow, and read the information on the second slide. This slide addresses the structure of a sequential narrative. Now, read the next slide, which addresses the features of a nonlinear narrative. Think about this information in the context of your own narrative. Which structure do you think would best convey your story?
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.3.2 Writing the Rough Draft   - Activity: Writing a Rough Draft Instructions: Now that you’ve planned out your narrative and learned about the elements of an effective narrative, it’s time to write your rough draft. Using your essay map as a guide, begin to write the narrative, keeping in mind that you will have time for revision and editing later.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3.a](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3/a)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3.b](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3/b)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3.c](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3/c)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3.d](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3/d)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3.e](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3/e)

6.3.3 Revising Your Personal Narrative   - Explanation: The Writing Center at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: “Revising Drafts” Link: The Writing Center at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: “Revising Drafts”

 Instructions: Read the following article on revision carefully,
taking note of both why it is necessary to revise and how to go
about doing it. Then, apply the techniques you’ve learned to your
own personal narrative, revising it so that it is more clear and
impactful.  
    
 Reading this article and completing this activity should take
approximately 2 hours.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Web Media: Jana Miller’s “Word Choice” Link: Jana Miller’s “Word Choice”
     
    Instructions: Now that you’ve written your personal narrative and performed one revision, it’s time to go back and look at one of the key components of a successful personal narrative - word choice. Watch the video, which illustrates the importance of word choice and its potentially powerful impact on the reader. Then, read back through your own narrative and replace some of your words and phrases for more impactful ones.
     
    Watching this video and completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.3.4 Proofreading Your Narrative   - Web Media: The Writing Center at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: “Proofreading” Link: The Writing Center at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: “Proofreading”

 Instructions: The final step of the writing process is to proofread
your paper for mechanical errors. Watch this video, which features
some techniques for proofreading, and then apply one or more of
these techniques to your own paper until you feel that it is free of
errors.  
    
 Watching this video and completing this activity should take
approximately 1 hour.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.SL.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/SL/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.L.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/L/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.L.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/L/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.4 Abraham Lincoln   As president of the United States during the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln played a pivotal role in the events that occurred during this time period and also inspired the literature of the day. In this subunit, you’ll get to hear from the president himself and read a poem written for him after his assassination. 

6.4.1 Abraham Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address   - Reading: EDSITEment!: Lesson 2: “The First Inaugural Address (1861) - Defending the American Union: ‘The Union of these States is Perpetual’: Lincoln’s View of the American Union” Link: EDSITEment!: Lesson 2: “The First Inaugural Address (1861) - Defending the American Union: “‘The Union of these States is Perpetual’: Lincoln’s View of the American Union”

 Instructions: Abraham Lincoln delivered his first inaugural address
in 1861 after seven states attempted to secede from the union. In
the speech, the president tries to keep our nation together by
making the argument that secession is unconstitutional. Read the
excerpt of the speech on pages 1 - 4 of the document, and then
answer the questions on page 5.  
    
 Reading this selection and answering the questions should take
approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.R.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.R.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.R.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.R.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.R.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.R.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/9)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.4.2 Abraham Lincoln’s The Gettysburg Address   - Reading: Project Gutenberg: Abraham Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address” and LibriVox: “Reading of The Gettysburg Address” Link: Project Gutenberg: Abraham Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address”  and LibriVox: “Reading of The Gettysburg Address”
 
Instructions: You may click on the first link to read or the second link to listen. If you choose to listen, you may choose the preferred audio download. You may also choose to read along with the audio. In any case, you should open the audio file and read the paragraph describing the historical context of the speech.
 
Reading this selection should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.4.3 “O Captain! My Captain!”   - Reading: Project Gutenberg: Poems of American Patriotism: Walt Whitman’s “O Captain! My Captain!” and LibriVox: “Reading of ‘O Captain! My Captain!’” Link: Project Gutenberg: Poems of American Patriotism: Walt Whitman’s “O Captain! My Captain!”  and LibriVox: “Reading of ‘O Captain! My Captain!’” 
 
Instructions: Walt Whitman, the transcendentalist poet we studied in Unit 4, wrote this moving elegy following the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. You may click on the first link to read or the second link to listen. If you choose to listen, you may click on the second link, and choose the preferred audio download. You may also choose to read along with the audio.
 
Reading this poem should take approximately 15 minutes.

 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Activity: K12 Handhelds: Types of Poetry 2: “Elegy” Link: K12 Handhelds: Types of Poetry 2: “Elegy”

    Instructions: Click on the link for “Elegy” in the table to contents. Read the definition of elegy, and then read the text of the poem and answer the questions below.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.5 The Red Badge of Courage   Stephen Crane’s novel The Red Badge of Courage has been called the most vivid portrayal of battle during the Civil War period. Told from the perspective of a young soldier, the book depicts vivid battle scenes as well as the emotions that war inevitably evokes. Though fiction, the novel reads as a firsthand account of battle and is a model of a new style of literature born from this era: realism. 

  • Reading: EDSITEment!: “The Red Badge of Courage: A New Kind of Courage - Introduction” Link: EDSITEment! The Red Badge of Courage: A New Kind of Courage-Introduction”

    Instructions: Read this introduction to the novel in order to gain valuable background information about the novel itself as well as how it was received by the public.
     
    Reading this selection should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: LibriVox: Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage and LibriVox: Stephen Crane’s *The Red Badge of Courage* Link: Project Gutenberg: Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage  and LibriVox: Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage
     
    Instructions: You may click on the first link to read or the second link to listen. If you choose to listen, you may click on the second link, and choose the preferred audio download. You may also choose to read along with the audio. Pause and use a printed or online dictionary to look up unfamiliar words as you read or listen. Also, take note of how the author handles the issue of courage in the novel. Repeat these steps until you have finished the entire novel.
     
    Reading this novel and taking notes should take approximately 4 hours.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.5.1 “Keenan’s Charge” vs. *The Red Badge of Courage*   - Reading: Project Gutenberg: The Poems of American Patriotism: George Parsons Lathrop’s “Keenan’s Charge” Link: Project Gutenberg: The Poems of American Patriotism: George Parsons Lathrop’s “Keenan’s Charge”

 Instructions: Scroll about halfway down the webpage to the poem
entitled “Keenan’s Charge” by George Parsons Lathrop, which
describes the battle of Chancellorsville. Read the poem in its
entirety.  
    
 Reading this poem should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.5.2 Courage vs. Cowardice in *The Red Badge of Courage*   - Reading: American Studies at the University of Virginia: “General Alexander C. McClurg, Letter to the *Dial”* Link: American Studies at the University of Virginia: “General Alexander C. McClurg, Letter to the Dial”

 Instructions: Not everyone agreed that Stephen Crane’s novel
deserved praise or even attention. Read this scathing letter by
General Alexander C. McClurg to the conservative magazine *Dial* on
April 16, 1896, taking note of his specific criticisms, especially
when he analyzes specific words and phrases. Do you believe
McClurg’s criticisms are warranted?  
    
 Reading this letter should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.6 Women’s Suffrage Movement in America   After the Civil War was over, the women’s suffrage movement was reinvigorated. Many civil rights activists were pushing for the 15th Amendment, which would give black men the right to vote. This reminded women that they too deserved a voice. As most any social movement does, women’s suffrage inspired artists, including authors, to speak out on the issue, either in matters of public policy or simply as a method of self-expression. 

  • Reading: Boundless: “Women’s Suffrage Movement” Link: Boundless: “Women’s Suffrage Movement”

    Instructions: Read this article on the women’s suffrage movement in America to gain an understanding of the historical and political context of the literature produced during this time period.
     
    Reading the material should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: EDSITEment!: “The Foremothers of Women’s Equality: Changing Attitudes and Beliefs - Nineteenth Century Attitudes Toward Women: Inferences and Evidence” Link: EDSITEment!: “The Foremothers of Women’s Equality: Changing Attitudes and Beliefs - Nineteenth Century Attitudes Toward Women: Inferences and Evidence”

    Primary Source Link:
    University of Missouri - Kansas City School of Law: “Cartoon Featuring Susan B. Anthony”;
    Assumption College - US Women’s History Workshop: “Homely Girls”;
    Assumption College - US Women’s History Workshop: “Who’s to Be President? By a Lady”; and
    Assumption College - US Women’s History Workshop: Ebenezer Elliot’s “Woman’s Mission”.

    Instructions: To gain a better understanding of how women were viewed and treated in the 19th century, you will have the opportunity to examine several primary documents from this time period. Follow the instructions on the PDF worksheet to determine what inferences can be made from each of the documents found in the primary source links above.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.6.1 Literature from the Suffrage Movement   6.6.1.1 Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions by Elizabeth Cady Stanton   - Reading: US State Department: “Declaration of Sentiments Urged Equal Rights for Women” Link: US State Department: “Declaration of Sentiments Urged Equal Rights for Women”
 
Instructions: In 1848, suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote the Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions, cleverly basing it on Thomas Jefferson’s iconic Declaration of Independence. Read the declaration. Then, refer back to the Declaration of Independence in subunit 2.2.3.2 and note how the declarations are similar in both structure and word choice.

-   What is the impact of these similarities?
-   Does it make Stanton’s declaration more impactful?
-   Show the two documents to a friend or family member and debate
    whether the similarities heighten or undermine Stanton’s
    argument.

Reading these declarations and completing this activity should take
approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/9)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.6.1.2 Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour”   - Reading: LibriVox’s Short Story Collection 003: “Reading of Kate Chopin’s ‘The Story of an Hour’” Link: LibriVox’s Short Story Collection 003: “Reading of Kate Chopin’s ‘The Story of an Hour’”

 Instructions: Scroll down the page to the 17th bullet point. Listen
to the entire reading of Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour.” Pause
to take notes on specific events of the story, as well as what you
learn about the main character, Mrs. Mallard.  
    
 Listening to this story and completing this activity should take
approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.6.1.2.1 Elements of a Short Story: Characterization   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Characterization through Thoughts” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Characterization through Thoughts”

 Instructions: Mrs. Mallard says little of nothing in the “The Story
of an Hour,” but she does a lot of thinking. Our thoughts can say a
lot about us. Carefully read all of the text on each of the seven
slides in the slideshow on characterization through thoughts.  
    
 Then, write a paragraph about how Chopin reveals Mrs. Mallard’s
character through her thoughts. List three of Mrs. Mallard’s traits
and indicate how each of them is revealed through her “private”
thoughts. Do Mrs. Mallard’s thoughts contradict her actions?  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/3)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.6.1.2.2 Elements of a Short Story: Irony   - Activity: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Situational Irony” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Situational Irony”

 Instructions: In Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour,” the end of
the story is something quite different than what the reader expects.
This is referred to as situational irony. Read the text on each of
the seven slides and then, go back to slide three.  

-   Do you think that the situational irony in this story
    accomplishes all four of these purposes?
-   Why or why not?

Now, go to the final slide. Write a brief description of the
situational irony in “The Story of an Hour” as if you were adding a
bullet point to the slideshow. Finally, write a letter Chopin
commenting on how she decided to end the story.  
-   Do you think it was a realistic ending?
-   Should Mrs. Mallard have reacted differently to her husband’s
    homecoming?
-   Why do you think she reacts the way she does? Address your
    opinions on these questions in your letter.

Reading this slideshow and completing this activity should take
approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.6.2 Women’s Rights Today   - Web Media: TED: Sheryl Sandberg’s “Why We Have Too Few Women Leaders” Link: TED: Sheryl Sandberg’s “Why We Have Too Few Women Leaders”

 Instructions: Although women have come a long way since the women’s
suffrage movement, not everyone agrees that they’ve achieved true
equality. Watch this video, and then, write a brief paragraph
summarizing Sandberg’s three main points.  
    
 Finally, read through some of the comments under the video, looking
for both comments that agree and disagree with the speaker. Write
your own comment either agreeing or disagreeing with one or more of
the points made in the video about gender inequality.  
    
 Watching this video and completing this activity should take
approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.1.c](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/1/c)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.1.d](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/1/d)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.