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K12ELA011: English Language Arts 11

Unit 5: Contemplating Mortality: The Dark Romantics   As you learned in the last unit, the transcendentalists believed that we are all part of the divine soul and as such, are inherently good. Not everyone agreed, however. In fact, the dark romantics were keenly aware of the evil in the world and in themselves and sought to make sense of it through their literature. Though undeniably pessimistic, this subgenre in American literature brought about some of the most suspenseful and entertaining works the world had yet to see.

Unit 5 Time Advisory
This unit should take approximately 10 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 5.1: 10 hours

        ☐    Subunit 5.1.1: 4 hours and 45 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 5.1.2: 4 hours and 15 minutes

Unit5 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
- Identify and analyze predominant themes of dark romanticism in America.
  - Identify and analyze the effects of poetry elements such as mood, metaphor, repetition, personification, and rhyme scheme.
  - Identify and analyze the effects of short story elements such as setting, symbolism, and point of view.
  - Write a comparison/contrast essay analyzing the ability of two distinct genres to convey themes.

Standards Addressed (Common Core):
- CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.7 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.9 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.L.4

5.1 Dark Romanticism   In this unit, you will explore the dark and melancholy worlds of Emily Dickinson and Edgar Allen Poe. Their works chilled readers and successfully defined a literary subgenre, called both dark romanticism and Gothicism. While delving into Dickinson’s poems and Poe’s short stories, you will examine the literary devices, tools, and techniques used to create such haunting and suspenseful reads.

  • Explanation: New York University Open Education: Cyrus Patell’s American Literature 1: From the Beginnings to the Civil War: “Lecture 10 - American Gothic (I)” Link: New York University Open Education: Cyrus Patell’s American Literature 1: From the Beginnings to the Civil War: “Lecture 10 - American Gothic (I)”

    Instructions: As you listen to this lecture, take note of the distinct characteristics of dark romanticism, or as the lecturer refers to it, American Gothic.
     
    Watching this lecture and taking notes should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

5.1.1 Edgar Allan Poe   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Tara Neely’s “Lesson One: Gothic Literature Introduction” Link: SOPHIA: Tara Neely’s “Lesson One: Gothic Literature Introduction”

 Instructions: Read the three questions at the top of the page, and
keep them in mind as you view the slideshow. Then, take the quiz on
the right side of the page to assess your learning.  
    
 Watching this slideshow and completing the quiz should take
approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11  -
     12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.1.1.1 “The Raven”   - Reading: Bartleby: Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Raven” Link: Bartleby: Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Raven”

 Instructions: Read Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven.”  
    
 Reading this poem should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11  -
     12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: LibriVox: Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven” Link: LibriVox: Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Raven”
     
    Instructions: Listen to the reading of this poem.
     
    Listening to this poem should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

5.1.1.1.1 Elements of Poetry: Mood, Tone, and Diction   - Activity: Wikipedia: “Tone (Literature)” Link: Wikipedia: “Tone (Literature)”

 Instructions: Read the entry on tone, paying particular attention
to the definition as well as the difference between tone and mood.
Then, write a brief summary of how Poe uses tone to create a certain
mood in “The Raven.”  
    
 Reading this selection and completing the activity should take
approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Did I Get This? Activity: Wikispaces: MamaJonni17’s “Diction in ‘The Raven’” Link: Wikispaces: MamaJonni17’s “Diction in ‘The Raven’”

    Instructions: Diction is the author’s choice of words in a poem or other work of literature, and it will vary in order to achieve a certain tone and/or mood. Diction can include certain allusions, or references to historical or well - known people, places, and things, as well as the connotations or feelings evoked by certain words.
     
    Using this information, reread “The Raven” and identify examples of diction in the poem and note how they contribute to the poem’s tone and mood. Once you are finished, check your answers using the link above.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: Jim Schroeder’s “Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘The Raven’” Link: Jim Schroeder’s “Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘The Raven’”
     
    Instructions: Watch the short film depicting the poem from the speaker’s point of view. Then, write a brief evaluation of the film based on how well it captures the poem’s overall mood.
     
    Watching this video and completing this activity should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

5.1.1.1.2 Elements of Poetry: Rhyme   - Activity: Grinnell College: Erik Simpson’s “Sounds in Poetry” Link: Grinnell College: Erik Simpson’s “Sounds in Poetry”

 Instructions: Read the description of the sounds in poetry. Take
note of the definitions of end rhyme, internal rhyme, slant rhyme,
and rhyme scheme. Then, map out the rhyme scheme of “The Raven.”
Finally, find three examples of internal rhyme in the poem.  
    
 Completing these activities should take approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.1.1.2 “The Fall of the House of Usher”   - Reading: Virginia Commonwealth University: Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher” Link: Virginia Commonwealth University: Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Fall of the House of Usher”

 Instructions: Read the hypertext of Poe’s “The Fall of the House of
Usher.” Click on the links as you read in order to gain a rich
understanding of the text.  
    
 Reading this selection should take approximately 45 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Community Audio: Radio Theatre Group’s “The Fall of the House of Usher, a Play Based on the Story by Edgar Allan Poe” Link: Community Audio: Radio Theatre Group’s“The Fall of the House of Usher, a Play Based on the Story by Edgar Allan Poe”

    Instructions: Listen to the audio of this play, based on Poe’s original story. Compare and contrast the play to the story.

    • Which did you find most interesting?
    • How does the play version of the story make it seem more modern?

    Listening to this play and completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):
    - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.7 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.2

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Explanation: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Setting” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Setting”

    Instructions: Click through the slideshow. Pay particular attention to the last slide about sensory details. How does Poe use sensory details to establish the setting in “The Fall of the House of Usher”?
     
    Viewing this slideshow and answering the question above should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Setting and Theme” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Setting and Theme”

    Instructions: Click through this slideshow. How does the setting of “The Fall of the House of Usher” reflect the theme of the story?
     
    Viewing this slideshow and answering the question above should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

5.1.2 Emily Dickinson   - Explanation: Great Writers Inspire: Erin Johnson’s “Emily Dickinson: Writing It ‘Slant’” Link: Great Writers Inspire: Erin Johnson’s “Emily Dickinson: Writing It ‘Slant’”

 Instructions: Read this description of Emily Dickinson’s life and
work. Pay particular attention to information regarding the author’s
literary techniques and themes.  
    
 Reading this selection should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.1.2.1 “Hope Is the Thing with Feathers”   - Reading: Wikispaces: EmilyDickinsonandherpoems: “Hope Is the Thing with Feathers” Link: Wikispaces: EmilyDickinsonandherpoems: “Hope Is the Thing with Feathers”

 Instructions: Read this poem. If you come across a word you don’t
know, scroll down to the “Vocabulary” section to see if the word is
in the vocabulary list.  
    
 Reading this poem should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.L.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/L/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Web Media: Dave Bonta’s “Hope Is the Thing with Feathers” Link: Dave Bonta’s “Hope Is the Thing with Feathers”
     
    Instructions: Watch this video, which features a reading of Dickinson’s poem set to images from the Civil War. Pay attention to the sounds and images, and think about how they affect both the meaning and the effect of the poem.
     
    Watching this video should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

5.1.2.1.1 Elements of Poetry: Metaphor   - Activity: Brooklyn College: Lilia Melani’s “Analysis of Metaphor in ‘Hope Is the Thing with Feathers’” Link: Brooklyn College: Lilia Melani’s Analysis of Metaphor in “Hope Is the Thing with Feathers

 Instructions: Please reread the poem at the top of the page. Then,
read the stanza - by - stanza analysis of the primary metaphor in
the poem. Allow the questions posed in the reading to give you a
rich understanding of the poem.  
    
 Then, write a response to the poem, either reinforcing Dickinson’s
view of hope or presenting an opposing viewpoint. Your response can
take any form you like: a poem, paragraph, poster, and so forth.  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.1.2.1.2 Elements of Poetry: Slant Rhyme   - Activity: Grinnell College: Erik Simpson’s “Sounds in Poetry” Link: Grinnell College: Erik Simpson’s “Sounds in Poetry”

 Instructions: Review this text, paying particular attention to the
definition of slant rhyme. Then, find two examples of slant rhyme in
the poem “Hope Is the Thing with Feathers.”  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.1.2.2 “Because I Could Not Stop for Death”   - Reading: Wikispaces: EmilyDickinsonandherpoems: “Because I Could Not Stop for Death” Link: Wikispaces: EmilyDickinsonandherpoems: “Because I Could Not Stop for Death”

 Instructions: Scroll down the page until you see the text of
“Because I Could Not Stop for Death.” Read the poem. If you come
across a word you don’t know, scroll down to the “Vocabulary”
section to see if the word is in the vocabulary list.  
    
 Reading this poem should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.L.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/L/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.1.2.2.1 Elements of Poetry: Personification   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Personification” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Personification”

 Instructions: Read through this slideshow. Pay particular attention
to the definition of personification, the examples provided, and the
reason why authors employ this literary technique.  
    
 Reading this selection should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Did I Get This? Activity: Wikispaces: MHS English Department: Dickinson and Poetry Learning Plan: “Personification in ‘Because I Could Not Stop for Death’” Link: Wikispaces: MHS English Department: Dickinson and Poetry Learning Plan: “Personification in ‘Because I Could Not Stop for Death’”

    Instructions: Now that you know what personification is, reread the poem “Because I Could Not Stop for Death” and consider how Dickinson uses personification.

    • What is personified in the poem? Note specific lines of the poem that use personification.
    • If Death is a person in the poem, what kind of person is he?
    • Why does Dickinson employ this technique?
    • What effect does it have on the reader?

    Check your answers to these questions by scrolling down to the section titled “Because I Could Not Stop for Death” at the link provided (a little more than halfway down the page) and reading the bullet points.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):
    - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.10

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

5.1.2.3 Comparison with “Hope Is a Thing with Feathers”   - Activity: Wikispaces: EmilyDickinsonandherpoems: “Comparison with ‘Hope Is a Thing with Feathers’” Link: Wikispaces: EmilyDickinsonandherpoems: “Comparison with ‘Hope Is a Thing with Feathers’”

 Instructions: Reread the text of both poems. Then, scroll down to
the “Discussion Questions” section and answer questions 1 - 4.  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/9)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.1.2.4 Emulate Emily   - Activity: EDSITEment!: “Emulate Emily Worksheet” Link: EDSITEment!: “Emulate Emily Worksheet”

 Instructions: Read the poem entitled “There’s a Certain Slant of
Light” at the top of the worksheet. Then, follow the instructions to
complete activities 1 through 3. Once you have completed your poem,
give it to a parent or friend to critique using the criteria
provided in Activity 4. As an optional extension, you may also wish
to post your poem on your personal blog or in The Saylor
Foundation’s [discussion
forum](http://forums.saylor.org/topic/5-1-2-4-emulate-emily/).  
    
 Reading this poem and completing these activities should take
approximately 1 hour.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/6)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.