Loading...

K12ELA011: English Language Arts 11

Unit 3: Seeking a National Literary Identity   In the last unit, we analyzed American foundational documents and discovered how the pen, being indeed mightier than the sword, contributed to our independence from Great Britain. With this newfound freedom came a desire to seek a national identity and make a name for ourselves in the worlds of art and culture, including literature. As writers sought to distinguish themselves from their British counterparts, some of the first great American literary works were born. 

Unit 3 Time Advisory
This unit should take approximately 14 hours and 45 minutes to complete.

☐    Subunit 3.1: 9 hours and 15 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 3.1.1: 5 hours and 45 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 3.1.2: 3 hours and 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 3.2: 5 hours and 30 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 3.2.1: 3 hours

        ☐    Subunit 3.2.2: 2 hours and 30 minutes

Unit3 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
- Identify themes in post - Revolutionary American literature.
  - Identify and analyze elements of a short story including plot and characterization.
  - Identify and analyze elements of poetry including rhyme, motif, imagery, and figurative language.
  - Write an explication and an analysis of a poem.

Standards Addressed (Common Core):
- CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.3d - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.L.5

3.1 Seeking a Literary Identity: Fiction   After the Revolutionary War, the United States gradually developed a separate cultural identity from Great Britain. In this subunit, we will read texts from what are considered the first generation of great American writers. James Fenimore Cooper and Washington Irving set their works in the United States and were responsible for creating and crystallizing ideas about American culture and landscape that remain common in American literature and imagination to this day. If you have heard the legend of Rip Van Winkle or seen a western movie or television show, you have seen evidence of the influence of these authors.

3.1.1 Who Was James Fenimore Cooper?   - Explanation: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “James Fenimore Cooper (1789 - 1851)” Link: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “James Fenimore Cooper (1789 - 1851)”

 Instructions: Scroll down to the entry on James Fenimore Cooper. As
you read, take notes on Irving’s talents and contributions as a
writer.  
    
 Reading this selection and taking notes should take approximately
15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Internet Archive: Old Time Radio: James Fenimore Cooper’s “Leatherstocking Tales” Link: Internet Archive: Old Time Radio: James Fenimore Cooper’s “Leatherstocking Tales”

    Instructions: Listen to the radio dramas depicting two novels from the Leatherstocking Tales series, The Deerslayer and The Last of the Mohicans.
     
    Listening to these audio files should take approximately 5 hours and 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.1.2 Who Was Washington Irving?   - Activity: EDSITEment!: “Activity 4 - Concluding The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” Link: EDSITEment!: “Activity 4 - Concluding The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”

 Instructions: Scroll down to Activity 4. Read the instructions that
are provided. Use the guiding questions to brainstorm ideas and make
predictions. Then, write a short story of your own describing an
episode in Ichabod Crane’s life that occurred after “The Legend of
Sleepy Hollow.”  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Explanation: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “Washington Irving (1789 - 1859)” Link: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “Washington Irving (1789 - 1859)”

    Instructions: Scroll down to the entry on Washington Irving. As you read, take notes on Irving’s talents and contributions as a writer.
     
    Reading this selection and taking notes should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: Project Gutenberg: Washington Irving’s “‘The Legend of Sleepy Hollow’ Audio” and “Text” Link: Project Gutenberg: Washington Irving’s “‘The Legend of Sleepy Hollow’ Audio” and “Text”

    Instructions: Click on the first link and download the MP3 version of the audio book. Then, click on the second link to open the text version of the story. Follow along with the text as you listen to the audio version.
     
    Reading and listening to this short story should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: EDSITEment!: “Activity 3 - Characters in The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” Link: EDSITEment!: “Activity 3 - Characters in The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”

    Instructions: Scroll down to Activity 3. Follow the instructions provided to complete it. Refer to the text version of the story, accessible from the previous link, as necessary to answer the questions
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.2 Seeking a Literary Identity: Poetry   The first group of American poets to gain wide popularity in both the United States and England later came to be referred to as the Fireside Poets; they include Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, William Cullen Bryant, James Russell Lowell, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and John Greenleaf Whittier. Like James Fenimore Cooper and Washington Irving, they often wrote about themes of nature, and like the earlier colonial writers, they were interested in ideas of the human soul, death, and potential salvation. They generally wrote in traditional poetic forms. In previous generations, a common homework assignment was to memorize and recite poetry from one of these poets, such as “Paul Revere’s Ride” or “The Song of Hiawatha.” In this unit, you will read some examples of poems from these writers as well as learn about some of the elements of poetry.

3.2.1 William Cullen Bryant’s “Thanatopsis”   - Reading: Virginia Commonwealth University: William Cullen Bryant’s “Thanatopsis” Link: Virginia Commonwealth University: William Cullen Bryant’s “Thanatopsis”

 Instructions: Read this poem several times, as necessary, in order
to grasp its meaning. Keep in mind that the title of the poem means
“meditation on death.”  
    
 Reading this poem should take approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Activity: Wikispaces: Bart Geis’s “Thanatopsis Handout” Link: Wikispaces: Bart Geis’s “Thanatopsis Handout”

    Instructions: Use this handout to paraphrase each section of the poem. Then, read the paraphrased version in order to get a better understanding of the poem.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.2.1.1 Elements of Poetry: Blank Verse   - Activity: Grinnell College: Erik Simpson’s “Blank Verse” Link: Grinnell College: Erik Simpson’s “Blank Verse”

 Instructions: Read the definition of blank verse in the first
paragraph as well as the origins of blank verse as detailed in the
second paragraph. Then, evaluate the example of blank verse from
Shakespeare’s *Hamlet*. Compare that to the blank verse in William
Cullen Bryant’s “Thanatopsis.” Finally, answer the question at the
bottom of the page.  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.2.1.2 Elements of Poetry: Motif   - Interactive Lab: Margo Roby’s Wordgathering: “Tuesday Tryouts, Trials, Tests, Practices, Auditions, Demonstrations” Link: Margo Roby’s Wordgathering: “Tuesday Tryouts, Trials, Tests, Practices, Auditions, Demonstrations”
 
Instructions: Read the blog post for a discussion of motifs. What are some of the benefits of using a motif in your writing? Try the exercise explained in the reading, and then write a poem using the motif of your choice.
 
Reading this blog post and completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3d](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3/d)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.L.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/L/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.2.2 Oliver Wendell Holmes’ “Chambered Nautilus”   - Reading: Project Gutenberg: A Child’s Book of Poems: Oliver Wendell Holmes’s “Chambered Nautilus” Link: Project Gutenberg: A Child’s Book of Poems: Oliver Wendell Holmes’s “Chambered Nautilus”
 
Instructions: Scroll down to the table of contents and click on “Part III.” Scroll again to find “Chambered Nautilus.” Read the poem several times, as necessary, in order to grasp its meaning.
 
Reading this poem should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.2.2.1 Elements of Poetry: Imagery   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Jen Eiserman’s “Analyzing Poetry for Imagery - ‘Memory’” Link: SOPHIA: Jen Eiserman’s “Analyzing Poetry for Imagery - ‘Memory’”
 
Instructions: Watch this tutorial on looking at imagery in a poem to analyze its meaning. After viewing the tutorial, reread the poem “Chambered Nautilus” and annotate it following the example in the video.
 
Watching this tutorial and completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.L.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/L/5/)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.2.2.2 Elements of Poetry: Metaphors   - Explanation: MoodleShare: “Using Metaphors When You Write” Link: MoodleShare: “Using Metaphors When You Write”
 
Instructions: You probably have learned about metaphors in your previous English language arts courses. Read this review of metaphors and how to use them. Did you notice any metaphors when you were reading “Chambered Nautilus”? Reread the poem again and see what metaphors you notice.
 
Reading this selection should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.