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K12ELA011: English Language Arts 11

Unit 2: Reason and Enlightenment in America   In the previous unit, you explored the thoughts and concerns of some of the earliest Americans. In addition to their basic survival, these Puritans were very focused on their religion, perhaps because the line between life and the afterlife seemed to be such a thin one. In history courses, you learn about how citizens began to have new ideas about liberty, equality, and freedom as the colonies grew and became well established. Americans read and internalized the literature of the enlightenment, which emphasized reason, experimentation, and logic instead of tradition, superstition, and fate. In this unit, you will not only be exposed to these new ideals of reason and enlightenment, but you will also examine the very texts that were written with the spirit of these ideas in mind: the US foundational documents. Through these readings, you can trace how enlightenment thinking came to form the central character and culture of the United States.*
 
*In US political discussions you often hear questions about what the Founding Fathers intended and the principles upon which the country was founded. In this unit, you will examine and analyze these texts for yourself and formulate arguments in response to those questions. You will also be invited to adopt the writing style of some of the US Founding Fathers as you draft both an autobiography and a persuasive essay.

Unit 2 Time Advisory
This unit should take approximately 30 hours and 30 minutes to complete.

☐    Subunit 2.1: 2 hours and 30 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 2.1.1: 2 hours

        ☐    Subunit 2.1.2: 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.2: 28 hours

        ☐    Subunit 2.2.1: 5 hours and 45 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 2.2.2: 6 hours

        ☐    Subunit 2.2.3: 16 hours and 15 minutes 

Unit2 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
- Identify the themes and characteristics of notable texts written during the Age of Reason and Enlightenment in America.
  - Identify the impact that this literature had on society and politics.
  - Gather facts from informational texts about notable figures during the Age of Reason in America.
  - Write an autobiography.
  - Identify and analyze the effect of persuasive rhetoric.
  - Implement persuasive rhetoric in a persuasive essay.
  - Analyze American foundational documents from both a literary and political perspective.

 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):
- CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.7 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.8 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.9 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.1a - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.1b - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.7 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.9 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.8 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.9 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.SL.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.SL.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.L.4

2.1 The Age of Reason and Enlightenment: Breaking Free   As you learned from studying Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel, The Scarlet Letter, and Arthur Miller’s play, The Crucible, the Puritans lived under very strict religious guidelines. As Americans learned more about science, however, they began to question their long-held religious beliefs. During this period, called the Age of Reason and Enlightenment, many writers and scholars began to entertain the idea that God played less of a direct role in the everyday lives of humans, though few of them declared themselves atheists.

2.1.1 How It Came About   - Explanation: New York University Open Education: Cyrus Patell’s American Literature 1: From the Beginnings to the Civil War: “Lecture 9 - American Enlightenment” Link: New York University Open Education: Cyrus Patell’s American Literature 1: From the Beginnings to the Civil War: “Lecture 9-American Enlightenment”

 Instructions: As you listen to this lecture, pay particular
attention to the doctrines of enlightenment as well as the struggle
embodied in Benjamin Franklin to balance religion and reason.  
    
 Listening to this lecture and completing this activity should take
approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11  -
     12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Web Media: SOPHIA: Dannyette Rouse’s “Voices of a Nation - Background Information” Link: SOPHIA: Dannyette Rouse’s “Voices of a Nation - Background Information”

    Instructions: Listen to this tutorial, which gives a brief background and introduction to the Age of Reason, sometimes called the Revolutionary Age, in American literature. Pause and take notes on the key attributes and events of the period.
     
    Listening to this tutorial and taking notes should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.2 Impact on Culture and Literature   - Reading: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “Democratic Origins and Revolutionary Writers, 1776 - 1820” Link: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “Democratic Origins and Revolutionary Writers, 1776 - 1820”
 
Instructions: Read from the introduction at the top of the page to the section on Benjamin Franklin. Take note of how the author distinguishes between the political revolution and the literary revolution that took place in America. According to him, why did it take so long for America to establish its literary independence? Name at least three reasons the author cites.
 
Reading this selection and completing this exercise should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2 Literature of the Age of Reason and Enlightenment   As we explore the literature of the Age of Reason and Enlightenment, you will discover that the authors of this time period were very logical in their thinking. Unlike the Puritans who valued the idea of heaven much more than their earthly lives, these authors were constantly thinking about how to improve themselves and the society in which they lived.

2.2.1 Benjamin Franklin   2.2.1.1 The Man   - Explanation: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)” Link: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)”
 
Instructions: Scroll down to the section on Benjamin Franklin. Read the first three paragraphs of the entry. Then, illustrate what you’ve learned about Franklin through a drawing, poem, chart, or timeline.
 
Reading this selection and completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.SL.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/SL/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.1.2 The Author   - Reading: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)” Link: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)”
 
Instructions: Scroll down to the section on Benjamin Franklin. Read the last five paragraphs of the entry. Then, write a brief description of two of Franklin’s most famous works: Poor Richard’s Almanack and Autobiography. What do these two works have in common?
 
Reading this selection and completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/9)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.1.3 *The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin*   - Reading: Hanover College History Department: Excerpt from *The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin* Link: Hanover College History Department: Excerpt from The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
 
Instructions: Read this excerpt from The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin.
 
Reading this excerpt should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Activity: EDSITEment!: “Launchpad: Benjamin Franklin’s Virtues” Link: EDSITEment!: “Launchpad: Benjamin Franklin’s Virtues”
     
    Instructions: Read the first paragraph on the webpage. It summarizes a portion of Franklin’s autobiography. Then, scroll down the page and answer each bulleted question under the six “WATCH” activities.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.1.3.1 Biography versus Autobiography   - Explanation: Paul Brians’s Common Errors in English Usage: “Autobiography/Biography” Link: Paul Brians’s Common Errors in English Usage: “Autobiography/Biography”
 
Instructions: Read this very simple distinction between an autobiography and biography. How do you think a person’s autobiography might differ from his or her biography in terms of content?
 
Reading this definition and answering the question above should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.L.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/L/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.1.3.2 Writing an Autobiography   - Checkpoint: Anne Pinchera’s “Writing an Autobiography” Link: Anne Pinchera’s “Writing an Autobiography”
 
Instructions: Read the assignment, and follow the instructions explicitly to write your very own autobiography.
 
Completing this exercise should take approximately 3 hours.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.2 Thomas Paine   2.2.2.1 The Author   - Explanation: Ludwig von Mises Institute: Gary Galles’s “Thomas Paine, an Appreciation” Link: Ludwig von Mises Institute: Gary Galles’s “Thomas Paine, an Appreciation”
 
Instructions: Read the introduction at the top of the page, stopping at the section entitled “The Role of Government.” After you have finished the reading, write a brief explanation of how Paine’s pamphlet affected the Revolutionary War, citing at least three specific examples.
 
Reading this selection and completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.2.2 *Common Sense*   - Reading: YouTube: CC Prose Audiobooks: Thomas Paine’s Common Sense: “Chapter 3: Thoughts on the Present State of American Affairs” Link: YouTube: CC Prose Audiobooks: Thomas Paine’s Common Sense: “Chapter 3: Thoughts on the Present State of American Affairs”
 
Instructions: Play the video, and read along with the text as you listen to the audio. Take notes on some of Paine’s key points. When you finish the video, write a brief statement describing Paine’s primary message.
 
Reading and listening to this text and completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.2.2.1 Identifying Rhetorical Devices   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Identifying Rhetorical Devices” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Identifying Rhetorical Devices”

 Instructions: Watch this screencast, and listen to the speaker’s
explanation of common types of rhetorical devices, what they are,
how they are used, and how to identify them in a text. Jot down the
four common rhetorical devices illustrated in the screencast, and
write a definition for each.  
    
 Watching this screencast and taking the notes indicated above
should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.2.2.2 Rhetorical Devices in Common Sense   - Explanation: Ludwig von Mises Institute: Gary Galles’s “Thomas Paine, an Appreciation” Link: Ludwig von Mises Institute: Gary Galles’s “Thomas Paine, an Appreciation”

 Instructions: Scroll down to the section entitled “The Role of
Government.” Read through the list of quotes below the heading as
well as those below the headings “Opposition to Tyranny,” “The
Principle of Liberty,” and “Willingness to Sacrifice for Liberty.”  
    
 As you read, look for and write down examples of the rhetorical
devices you learned about in the previous activity. Then, write a
sentence or two explaining the purpose of the rhetorical device.  
    
 Reading this selection and completing this activity should take
approximately 45 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.2.3 Writing a Persuasive Essay   - Activity: E Reading Worksheets: Donzo Mortini’s “101 Persuasive Essay Topics” Link: E Reading Worksheets: Donzo Mortini’s “101 Persuasive Essay Topics”

 Instructions: As intelligent and logical thinkers, the writers of
the Age of Reason and Enlightenment were very good at making
persuasive arguments. Now that you’ve analyzed some of their
rhetorical devices, it is time to try your hand at drafting a
persuasive essay of your own.  
    
 The first step is to choose a topic.  Browse this list of
persuasive essay topics. You may choose one of these topics or come
up with a similar one. As you brainstorm for ideas, keep in mind
that the more passionate you are about the subject, the more
persuasively you will be able to argue it. Take a few minutes to
think of something you feel strongly about, jot down some ideas, and
choose a topic for your persuasive essay before moving on to the
next activity.  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/7)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.SL.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/SL/1)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.3 18th - Century Foundational Documents   Though you may have learned in history class about the Declaration of Independence and Constitution and the freedoms they ensured US citizens, you may have never thought of these documents as literary works. In this subunit, we will discuss the specific language and rhetoric our Founding Fathers carefully employed to argue against a tyrannical government and guarantee civil liberties for each and every one of us. 

2.2.3.1 Who Was Thomas Jefferson?   - Interactive Lab: Library of Congress: “Thomas Jefferson Exhibition” Link: Library of Congress: “Thomas Jefferson Exhibition”

 Instructions: Click on the different sections (Monticello, Virginia
Republic, etc.) to explore information on Thomas Jefferson’s life
and work. What events in Thomas Jefferson’s life do you think
influenced his point of view on freedom? Select four primary sources
besides the Declaration of Independence that you think inform or
illustrate his view on freedom. Write a paragraph on what each
document says about Jefferson’s beliefs about freedom, providing
evidence from the text.  
    
 Reading these documents and completing this activity should take
approximately 4 hours.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/7)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/7)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 -
    12.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/11-12/9)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above

2.2.3.2 The Declaration of Independence   - Reading: National Archives’s Charters of Freedom: “The Declaration of Independence: A Transcription” Link: National Archives’s Charters of Freedom: “The Declaration of Independence: A Transcription”

 Instructions: Read the text of the Declaration of Independence.  
    
 Reading this document should take approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.3.3 The Constitution   - Reading: National Archives’s Charters of Freedom: “The Constitution of the United States: A Transcription” Link: National Archives’s Charters of Freedom: “The Constitution of the United States: A Transcription”

 Instructions: Read the text of the US Constitution.  
    
 Reading this material should take approximately 45 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.3.3.1 The Six Big Ideas in the Constitution   - Explanation: Boundless: “Separation of Powers” Link: Boundless: “Separation of Powers”

 Instructions: Separation of powers is the fifth of the six big
ideas addressed in the US Constitution. In order to understand the
concept of separation of powers, read the definition at the top of
the page, and then read the four bullet points below the definition,
which provide additional information on the concept of separation of
powers.  
    
 Reading this selection should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Explanation: National Archives, The Center for Legislative Archives: “Lesson Plans: Teaching Six Big Ideas in the Constitution” Link: National Archives, The Center for Legislative Archives: “Lesson Plans: Teaching Six Big Ideas in the Constitution”

    Instructions: Scroll down to the section entitled “Guiding Question.” Read this section paying particular attention to the six big ideas addressed in the US Constitution. Keep these in mind and refer back to them as necessary as you study the Constitution in this section of the course.
     
    Reading this section should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Explanation: Boundless: “Limited Government” Link: Boundless: “Limited Government”

    Instructions: Limited government is the first of the six big ideas in the US Constitution. To gain a basic understanding of what limited government means, read the definition of the term at the top of the page, and then read the six bullet points below the definition, which provide additional information on the concept of limited government.
     
    Reading this selection should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Explanation: Boundless: “American Republicanism” Link: Boundless: “American Republicanism”

    Instructions: Republicanism is the second of the six big ideas addressed in the US Constitution. In order to understand the concept of republicanism, read the definition at the top of the page, and then read the five bullet points below the definition, which provide additional information on the concept of Republicanism.
     
    Reading this selection should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Explanation: Boundless: “Checks and Balances” Link: Boundless: “Checks and Balances”

    Instructions: Checks and balances is the third of the six big ideas addressed in the US Constitution. In order to understand the concept of checks and balances, read the definition at the top of the page, and then read the four bullet points below the definition, which provide additional information on the concept of checks and balances.
     
    Reading this selection should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Explanation: Boundless: “Federalism” Link: Boundless: “Federalism”
     
    Instructions: Federalism is the fourth of the six big ideas addressed in the US Constitution. In order to understand the concept of federalism, read the definition at the top of the page, and then read the five bullet points below the definition, which provide additional information on the concept of federalism.
     
    Reading this selection should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Explanation: Boundless: “Popular Sovereignty” Link: Boundless: “Popular Sovereignty”

    Instructions: Popular sovereignty is the last of the six big ideas addressed in the US Constitution. In order to understand the concept of popular sovereignty, read the definition in the third bullet point on the webpage.
     
    Reading this selection should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.3.3.2 Outlining the Six Big Ideas in the Constitution   - Activity: National Archives, Center for Legislative Archives: “Outlining the Six Big Ideas in the Constitution” Link: National Archives, Center for Legislative Archives: “Outlining the Six Big Ideas in the Constitution”

 Instructions: Use this handout and the text of the US Constitution
accessible from the link provided in subunit 2.2.3.3 to locate and
document references to each of the six big ideas in the US
Constitution. Use the space provided to identify the location of
each quote and provide a paraphrased version of the quote.  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.3.4 The Bill of Rights   - Activity: EDSITEment!: “Activity 2 - Is a Bill of Rights Necessary?” Link: EDSITEment!: “Activity 2 - Is a Bill of Rights Necessary?”

 Instructions: Follow the directions on the worksheet to understand
the opposing views of the Federalists and the Anti - Federalists
regarding the necessity of a Bill of Rights.  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.