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K12ELA011: English Language Arts 11

Unit 1: America’s Religious Heritage   In social studies, you may have learned how the early colonial Americans lived -- what they ate, how they lived, and what their day-to-day challenges were* *- but have you ever wondered what they were thinking? What things they were worrying and dreaming about? In this unit, you’ll be able to take a peek inside the minds and hearts of these early Americans to discover the answers to all of these questions and more. In this unit on early American literature, you will also learn and apply techniques for understanding, analyzing, and writing about literature.

Unit 1 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take you approximately 33 hours.

☐    Subunit 1.1: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 1.2: 32 hours

        ☐    Subunit 1.2.1: 3 hours

        ☐    Subunit 1.2.2: 3 hours and 30 minutes

        ☐    Subunit 1.2.3: 14 hours

        ☐    Subunit 1.2.4: 11 hours and 30 minutes

Unit1 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
- Identify the themes and characteristics of early colonial literature.
  - Identify and analyze an author’s use of figurative language.
  - Paraphrase difficult text.
  - Identify and analyze the effect of inversion.
  - Apply knowledge of subject - verb agreement rules.
  - Locate support for an argument or theory within a text.
  - Write a logically sound, coherent, and grammatically correct literary analysis.
  - Identify elements of historical fiction.
  - Identify and analyze the effects of symbolism on a work of literature.
  - Use context clues to define new words.
  - Identify the parts of a novel.
  - Write effective chapter summaries.
  - Identify and analyze the effects of foreshadowing.
  - Analyze character development over the duration of a literary work.
  - Identify and analyze the development of theme in a literary work.
  - Compare and contrast varying interpretations of a literary work.

 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):
- CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 - 12.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.5 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.7 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.8 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.6 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.7 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.3 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.W.1 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.W.9 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.W.10

1.1 Early Colonial Life and Values   What was it like to live in the colonial times? If you have even a vague idea of the kinds of lives early Americans lived, it’s only because of the writers of the day. In order to understand the literature that they produced, you must first have an understanding of their world, which was very different from our modern-day society. 

  • Explanation: LibriVox: Henry A. Beers’s A Brief History of English and American Literature: “Part 2, Preface & Chapter 1 - The Colonial Period, 1607 - 1765” Link: LibriVox: Henry A. Beers’s A Brief History of English and American Literature: “Part 2, Preface & Chapter 1 -The Colonial Period, 1607 - 1765”
     
    Instructions: Scroll down and listen to the entire audio lecture entitled “Part 2, Preface & Chapter 1 -The Colonial Period, 1607 - 1765.” As you listen, take notes on the connections the speaker makes between the history of the colonial period and the literature produced during this period.

    • What does she say about the literary significance of this early literature?
    • How does she explain the lack of noteworthy literature during this period?
    • What adjectives does she use to describe the literature that does exist? 

    In addition, take notes on how the speaker characterizes the life and values of the early settlers. What kinds of people were the Puritans, according to the speaker? Make a list of traits. Keep these notes handy as you proceed through the rest of this unit.
     
    Listening to this audio book and completing this exercise should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):
    - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.10 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.2

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.2 Early Colonial Literature   Although they may not have thought of themselves as “authors,” per se, early colonial writers made important contributions to the foundation of American literature by documenting historical information. Without these early writings, we would not have a clear picture of what life was like for colonial Americans. In this subunit, we will be looking at the works of some of the most notable writers of the day. 

1.2.1 America’s First Published Poet: Anne Bradstreet   Anne Bradstreet may have been considered a “normal” woman in her time, but her writings depicting the everyday lives of early Americans made her an icon in history. In this subunit, we will be introduced to Bradstreet and one of her most famous poems. 

1.2.1.1 Who Was Anne Bradstreet?   - Explanation: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “Early American and Colonial Period to 1776: Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612 - 1672)” Link: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s Outline of American Literature: “Early American and Colonial Period to 1776: Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612 - 1672)”

 Instructions: Scroll down to the entry for Anne Bradstreet. Read
the short biography and write down three important facts about the
author’s life and literature.  
    
 Reading this section and completing this exercise should take
approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.1.2 “Verses upon the Burning of Our House”   - Reading: Poetry Foundation: Anne Bradstreet’s “Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10th, 1666” Link: Poetry Foundation: Anne Bradstreet’s “Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10th, 1666”

 Instructions: Read the full version of Anne Bradstreet’s “Verses
upon the Burning of Our House” two or three times until you are able
to recount the events detailed in the poem. Take note of how the
speaker’s perspective changes during the course of the poem.  

-   What does she realize at the end? Then, think about this poem in
    light of what you have learned about Puritan values.
-   How is it representative of the Puritan culture?

Reading this poem and completing this exercise should take you
approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.1.2.1 Paraphrasing   - Activity: Connexions: Rinko Kawakami’s “How to Paraphrase: Writing in Your Own Words” Link: Rinko Kawakami’s “How to Paraphrase: Writing in Your Own Words”

 Instructions: Read the first section of this webpage. Then, follow
the steps listed to paraphrase Anne Bradstreet’s “Verses upon the
Burning of Our House.”  
    
 Reading this selection and completing this exercise should take
approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.1.2.2 Use of Inversion   - Explanation: Wikipedia: “Inversion (linguistics)” Link: Wikipedia: “Inversion (Linguistics)”

 Instructions: Read the first paragraph of the Wikipedia entry on
inversion. Then, scroll down to the section entitled “Subject - Verb
Inversion.” Take note of the examples of inversion presented.  
    
 Then, find similar examples of inversion in Anne Bradstreet’s
“Verses upon the Burning of Our House.” Write down as many examples
as you can find.  
    
 Next, go back to the poem and substitute the inverted sentences
into normal word order. Then read the full poem without the
inversion and compare the two versions.  

-   Which is better?
-   Why do you think Bradstreet decided to use inversion in her
    poem?

 Reading this selection and completing this exercise should take
approximately 45 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/3)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
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1.2.1.2.3 Subject - Verb Agreement   - Explanation: Writing for Success: “Chapter 2, Section 2: Subject - Verb Agreement” Link: Writing for Success: “Chapter 2, Section 2: Subject - Verb Agreement”
 
Instructions: Go to “Chapter 2: Writing Basics: What Makes a Good Sentence?” and then read “Section 2.2: Subject - Verb Agreement” on pages 59- 71, completing exercises 1 - 4 as you go.
 
After reading, think about how subject - verb agreement and inversion are related. Both involve the subject and verb of a sentence, but one is a rule that cannot be broken and the other is an issue of style. Which is which?
 
Reading this section and completing this exercise should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.2 Jonathan Edwards: Preacher and Author   While Anne Bradstreet offers us a glimpse into the religious foundations of early Americans, her writings only touch the surface of what a powerful force religion came to be during the Great Awakening. In this subunit, we will meet one of the leaders of this transformative movement, a preacher named Jonathan Edwards. 

1.2.2.1 Who Was Jonathan Edwards?   - Explanation: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s: Outline of American Literature: “Early American and Colonial Period to 1776: Jonathan Edwards (1703 - 1758)” Link: US Department of State: Kathryn VanSpanckeren’s: Outline of American Literature: “Early American and Colonial Period to 1776: Jonathan Edwards (1703 - 1758)”

 Instructions: Scroll down to the entry for Jonathan Edwards. Read
the short biography and write down three important facts about the
author’s life and literature.  
    
 Reading this selection and completing this exercise should take
approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.2.2 “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”   - Reading: International Outreach: Jonathan Edwards’s “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” Link: International Outreach: Jonathan Edwards’s “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”
 
Instructions: Read the sermon, stopping and rereading if you don’t understand something. Reread the sermon two to three times as necessary in order to understand the underlying message. If you are having difficulty, it may help to print the page and make notes on the text as you read.
 
Reading this sermon and completing this exercise should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.2.2.1 Imagery in “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”   - Activity: EDSITEment!: “Imagery” Link: EDSITEment!: “Imagery”

 Instructions: Read the definition of imagery on the top of the
page. Pay particular attention to the portion of the definition that
refers to images as “descriptions that evoke the senses.”  
    
 Then, choose an item in the room you are sitting in and write a
description of the object in a way that evokes as many different
senses as possible. Note that it is very difficult to create imagery
that evokes all of the senses at once.  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Activity: EDSITEment!: “The First Great Awakening Chart” Link: EDSITEment!: “The First Great Awakening Chart”
     
    Instructions: Use the chart on the first two pages of the handout to list as many examples as possible of imagery and the religious beliefs expressed in Jonathan Edwards’s “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God.”
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.2.2.2 Vocabulary in “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”   - Activity: AP English Language: Katie Cho’s “My Personal Vocabulary List” Link: AP English Language: Katie Cho’s “My Personal Vocabulary List”

 Instructions: As you read “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,”
you probably encountered some words that you were unfamiliar with.
You may have used some context clues to infer the meanings of these
words.  
    
 Now, go back to the text and identify these words. Use a bound or
online dictionary to confirm the definitions of these words.  
    
 Then, create a chart like the one found at the link provided to
begin your personal vocabulary list. You can then use this list
throughout the course to document newly acquired vocabulary!  
    
 Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/6)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.2.2.3 Writing a Literary Analysis   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Dan Reade’s “Selecting Topics for Literary Analysis: The Basics of Literary Analysis” Link: SOPHIA: Dan Reade’s “Selecting Topics for Literary Analysis: The Basics of Literary Analysis”
 
Instructions: Scroll down to the section titled “The Basics of Literary Analysis.” Click on the “Full Screen” button below the document to see it better. Then, read the document in its entirety.
 
Reading this section and completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.3 Nathaniel Hawthorne: An Author with a Haunting Past   1.2.3.1 Who Was Nathaniel Hawthorne?   Nathaniel Hawthorne is one of America’s best-known writers. One of his ancestors was an infamous judge in the Salem witch trials, a dark stain on the fabric of American history. Perhaps because of his lineage, Hawthorne became quite interested in the evils of humanity, and though he was born much later, he set much of his work during the Puritan time period. 

  • Web Media: EDSITEment!: American Memory’s “Nathaniel Hawthorne, Author” Link: EDSITEment!: American Memory’s “Nathaniel Hawthorne, Author”

    Instructions: Examine the image of Nathaniel Hawthorne.

    • What type of person does he look like?
    • What kind of literature do you think a person like this would create?
    • Make a list of character traits you predict the author embodies.

    Completing this activity should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):
    - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 - 12.2

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: Quotations Book: “Quotes by Nathaniel Hawthorne” Link: Quotations Book: “Quotes by Nathaniel Hawthorne”
     
    Instructions: Read the entire list of quotes by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Use what you have learned about paraphrasing to write a paraphrased version of each quote. Then, reflect on the meanings of each of the quotes. From what you have read:

    • What can you gather about Hawthorne’s worldview?
    • What topics seem to fascinate the author? 

    Reading these quotations and completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):
    - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.CCRA.R.1

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.3.2 “The Minister’s Black Veil”   - Activity: LibriVox: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Minister’s Black Veil” Link: LibriVox: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Minister’s Black Veil”
 
Instructions: Scroll down the page and locate the fourth audio file. Listen to the entire audio version of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Minister’s Black Veil.” As you listen, pause periodically to take notes on the events of the story, especially those surrounding the mysterious veil that the minister wears.
 
Listening to this story and completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.3.2.1 Elements of a Short Story   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Victoria Costley’s “Story Elements Notes” Link: SOPHIA: Victoria Costley’s “Story Elements Notes”

 Instructions: Watch all three videos in the Story Elements series.
Then, create your own story map for “The Minister’s Black Veil.”  
    
 Watching these videos and completing this activity should take
approximately 45 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.3.2.2 Identifying and Analyzing Symbols   - Activity: EDSITEment!: “Symbol” Link: EDSITEment!: “Symbol”
 
Instructions: Scroll down the page, and read the definition of the literary term “symbol.” Can you think of some common symbols in our society? Make a list of them.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.R.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/1)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Activity: EDSITEment!: “The Statue of Liberty: The Meaning and Use of a National Symbol” Link: EDSITEment!: “The Statue of Liberty: The Meaning and Use of a National Symbol”

    Instructions: Read the introduction to the lesson. Then, click on the “Guiding Questions” link on the left side of the page. Write down answers to each of these questions. Then, click on “Lesson Activities” from the menu. Read the second paragraph of “Activity 1” and think about how the meaning of a symbol can change over time as well as from person to person. Proceed to “Activity 2” and answer the bulleted questions about the Statue of Liberty. Then, complete the two tasks listed under “Posters” in “Activity 4.”
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: EDSITEment!: “Analyzing Symbols Chart” Link: EDSITEment!: “Analyzing Symbols Chart”
     
    Instructions: The primary symbol in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Minister’s Black Veil” is the veil itself. However, like the Statue of Liberty, this symbol changes meaning depending on the context. Use the chart to trace the different meanings of the veil portrayed throughout the story.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.3.3 Reading and Understanding Hawthorne’s *The Scarlet Letter*   1.2.3.3.1 Decoding Vocabulary in Context   - Explanation: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Interpreting Vocabulary in Context” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Interpreting Vocabulary in Context”

 Instructions: As you prepare to read *The Scarlet Letter* by
Nathaniel Hawthorne, it is important to acquire certain specific
reading skills, such as decoding vocabulary in context. The author
uses some difficult and antiquated words throughout the text. This
slideshow teaches you how to use the context, or the words
surrounding the unfamiliar word, to determine its meaning.  
    
 Read all six slides, and then prepare a page in your notebook or
Word document to list the unfamiliar words you encounter in *The
Scarlet Letter*,the context clues in the text, and your
determination of what the words actually mean.  
    
 Reading the slides and completing this activity should take
approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.L.11 -
    12.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/11-12/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Project Gutenberg: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s *The Scarlet Letter* Link: Project Gutenberg: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter

    Instructions: Read Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter. As you read, take notes on the main events of the novel, including the characters’ references to the scarlet letter. You should also add unfamiliar words and their definitions to the list you prepared in the former activity.
     
    Reading this novel and completing this activity should take approximately 8 hours.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.3.3.2 Analyzing Character Development   - Reading: EDSITEment!: “Character Traits Chart” Link: EDSITEment!: “Character Traits Chart”
 
Instructions: Complete one of these character charts for each of the main characters in The Scarlet Letter: Hester, Dimmesdale, Chillingworth, and Pearl.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.4 Arthur Miller: Political Playwright   Like Nathaniel Hawthorne, Arthur Miller was intensely interested in the Puritan age, especially the Salem witch trials. Known as one of America’s best playwrights, Miller won the Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1948. 

1.2.4.1 Who Was Arthur Miller?   - Web Media: Jewish Book Week: “Arthur Miller” Web Media: Prezi: Pam Thrasher’s “Arthur Miller: The Politics and Purpose of his Writing”
 
Link: Prezi: Pam Thrasher’s “Arthur Miller: The Politics and Purpose of his Writing”
Instructions:  Watch the slideshow detailing Arthur Miller’s political stance and how it impacted his plays. Pay particular attention to the information regarding The Crucible. This should take you approximately 5 minutes
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   CCSS.ELA.Literacy.CCRA.SL.2

   
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.  

1.2.4.2 The Crucible by Arthur Miller   - Reading: Community Audio: Chattanooga Theatre Centre Stages: “Arthur Miller’s The Crucible Mixdown” Link: Community Audio: Chattanooga Theatre Centre Stages: “Arthur Miller’sThe Crucible Mixdown”

 Instructions: Listen to the audio of *The Crucible* mixdown. Take
notes on the key themes of the play as described in the audio. After
you listen, write a single sentence describing why you think Arthur
Miller decided to write the play.  
    
 Listening to this audio file and completing this activity should
take approximately 15 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/11-12/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Drama” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Drama”

    Instructions: Read this tutorial on the elements of drama. Pay particular attention to the information regarding Arthur Miller’s The Crucible.
     
    Reading this material should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.4.2.1 The Crucible: Act I, Scene 1   - Web Media: YouTube: Life Skills Center of Columbus: “The Crucible Act I Scene I (with Antecedent Action)” Link: YouTube: Life Skills Center of Columbus: The Crucible Act 1 Scene 1 (with Antecedent Action)”
 
Instructions: Watch this video, paying attention to the speaker’s explanation of why The Crucible and other plays can be difficult to understand. Do you agree with this assessment?
 
After watching the video, write a brief summary of the events, including the events that occur during the antecedent action. Then, make a list of each of the main characters presented in the first scene. List any major character traits you can glean from each character’s words and actions.
 
Watching this video and completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/3)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.4.2.2 The Crucible: Act I, Scene II   - Web Media: YouTube: Life Skills Center of Columbus: “The Crucible Act I Scene 2” Link: YouTube: Life Skills Center of Columbus: The Crucible Act 1 Scene 2"
 
Instructions: Watch this video, paying particular attention to the interaction between John Proctor and Abigail. What do we learn about these two characters and their relationship with one another? Add to the character list you made in the last activity based on what we learn about John and Abigail.
 
Then, write a brief summary of the events that occur involving Betty. What are the possible implications of these events? Listen carefully to the recap of the events at the end of the video. Add to your summaries and character lists based on this commentary.
 
Watching this video and completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/3)

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1.2.4.2.3 The Crucible: Act II, Scene I   - Web Media: YouTube: Life Skills Center of Columbus: “The Crucible Act 2 Reading (with Introduction)” Link: YouTube: Life Skills Center of Columbus: The Crucible Act 2 Reading (with Introduction)”
 
Instructions: Watch this video, listening carefully to the exchange between John Proctor and his wife Elizabeth. What do we learn about John, Elizabeth, and Mary Warren from this exchange? Add these insights to your character list.
 
Then, write a brief summary of the events in this scene, making particular note of the suspicions Elizabeth has of Proctor as well as the internal conflict John experiences over whether to expose Abigail. Take note also of the details John Proctor learns from Mary Warren about the witch trials in Salem.
 
Watching this video and completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/3)

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1.2.4.2.4 The Crucible: Act II, Scene II   - Web Media: YouTube: Life Skills Center of Columbus: “The Crucible Act 2, Scene 2” Link: YouTube: Life Skills Center of Columbus: The Crucible Act 2, Scene 2”
 
Instructions: Watch this video, taking particular note of the exchange between Reverend Hale and John Proctor. What do we learn about these two characters as well as Reverend Paris from this exchange? Add these observations to your character list. Write a brief summary of the events that occur after Cheever arrives at the Proctor house. Then, make a prediction as to what you think will happen to Elizabeth and the other women accused.
 
Watching this video and completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/3)

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1.2.4.2.5 The Salem Witch Trials   - Web Media: Caleb Kinchlow’s “The Truth Behind the Salem Witch Trials” Link: Vimeo: Caleb Kinchlow’s “The Truth Behind the Salem Witch Trials”
 
Instructions: Like The Scarlet Letter, Arthur Miller’s play, The Crucible,is an example of historical fiction. That is, although he fictionalized many of the details and events that occurred in the play, it is largely based on the real events that we now collectively refer to as the Salem witch trials. To gain insight into the truth of these events, please watch this video in its entirety.
 
Watching this video should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA - Literacy.SL.11 -
    12.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/11-12/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
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  • Activity: EDSITEment!: Dramatizing History in Arthur Miller’s The Crucible: “Activity 1 - Historical Figures Research: Biography and Court Transcripts” Link: EDSITEment!: Dramatizing History in Arthur Miller’sThe Crucible: “Activity 1 - Historical Figures Research: Biography and Court Transcripts”
     
    Instructions: One of the most compelling aspects of The Crucible is the fact that it is based on real - life people and events. In this activity, you will be researching one of the historical figures portrayed in the play and presenting a written or oral report, which answers the following questions:

    • What about your character seems especially interesting or compelling?
    • How would you dramatize your character to make him or her come to life for a contemporary audience?

    To begin, read the instructions for Activity 1. Then, choose a character and use the resources in the “Preparation Instructions” section linked on the left side of the webpage as well as other online sources to gather information about your chosen character.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 4 hours.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):
    - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.RI.11 - 12.7 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.2 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.4 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.7 - CCSS.ELA - Literacy.W.11 - 12.8

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1.2.4.3 Making Connections with *The Crucible*   - Interactive Lab: Dana Huff’s “Witch Hunt: A Web Scavenger Hunt for The Crucible Link: Dana Huff’s “Witch Hunt: A Web Scavenger Hunt forThe Crucible

 Instructions: Follow the directions to complete the web scavenger
hunt and writing responses. If any links do not work, try searching
to find the relevant material. If that is not possible, skip that
number and complete as many as you are able to.  
    
 Working through each of the web activities and writing the
responses should take approximately 3 hours.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):  

-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.W.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/W/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA -
    Literacy.CCRA.R.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/CCRA/R/1)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Checkpoint: MoodleShare: Jennifer Tuuri Saybolt’s “Research & The Crucible Link: MoodleShare: Jennifer Tuuri Saybolt’s “Research &The Crucible”

    Instructions: Go through this course to learn how to conduct research, evaluate sources, and complete a research project. Whenever the instructions direct you to submit a portion of the assignment, please post your ideas to the discussion forum for this course. Select a topic based on the text of The Crucible or any of the themes or connections you learned about in the previous activity. Complete a Prezi presentation to share and discuss your research project.
     
    Completing these activities should take approximately 15 hours.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

Extension Resources   If any or all of the units you have studied in the course have ignited an interest in learning more, the following list will help you. It contains books and other resources you can use for further study. You will most likely be able to find many of these items in your local public library.

  • Reading: The Crucible by Arthur Miller The Crucibleis a famous play based on the Salem witch trials that occurred in Massachusetts from 1692 - 1693. Though it is historical fiction, it accurately portrays many of the events that occurred during the trials and is a reflection of America’s strict, Puritanical roots.