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K12ELA010: English Language Arts 10

Unit 6: Macbeth   Shakespeare can provide rigorous and challenging (but rewarding) reading experiences for students. As a later unit in the course, Macbethwill encourage you to read closely and carefully for meaning, while finding relevance in the text’s prevailing themes.
 
This unit provides an introduction to Shakespeare and the English Renaissance. You will become accustomed to the literary traditions of the time along with the Renaissance’s most famous playwright. As the course’s only play, Macbethwill also serve as a general lesson on dramatic literature.
 
While reading, you will learn to interpret Shakespeare’s language through contextual clues, vocabulary acquisition, and summarization. As you parse the language and gain an understanding of the plot, you will analyze the play’s finer points: the psychology of the characters, human nature, and political/social commentary. The unit will culminate in a multigenre project that exhibits your ability to not only comprehend the reading but also reflect on its themes.
 
This unit is challenging, as it deals with a new genre of literature (dramatic literature) in Elizabethan English and touches upon relatively complex themes. By rising to meet this challenge, you will find your reading, writing, and analytical skills much improved. 

Unit 6 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take approximately 64 hours.

☐    Subunit 6.1: 6 hours and 25 minutes

☐    Subunit 6.2: 2 hours and 45 minutes

☐    Subunit 6.3: 30 hours and 50 minutes

☐    Subunit 6.4: 12 hours

☐    Subunit 6.5: 12 hours

Unit6 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
·         Analyze an author’s message, intent, and writing style, and respond critically to it using textual support.
·         Utilize a range of reading strategies (e.g., annotating, questioning, defining) to facilitate the comprehension of challenging texts or unfamiliar content.
·         Create cogent, detailed, analytical responses to a text (i.e., persuasive writing, research-based expository writing, and literary analysis).
·         Identify and evaluate the key elements, terminology, and traditions of literature. 

Standards Addressed (Common Core):
·         CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1
·         CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2
- CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.7 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.6

6.1 Introduction to the Renaissance   What does Renaissance mean? In this case, Renaissance refers to a new birth, or revival, of art and literature. The Renaissance occurred in Europe beginning in the 14th century and lasting through the 17th century. This time period served as a sort of transition period from medieval times to modern times. To better understand Shakespeare and his plays, this subunit offers some background about the world in which Shakespeare lived. 

6.1.1 Political and Social Atmosphere of the Elizabethan Era   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Dannyette Rouse’s “The Renaissance Era” Link: SOPHIA: Dannyette Rouse’s “The Renaissance Era” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link, and watch this video about the Renaissance. Take notes as you watch so you can refer back to them later.
 
Watching this video and taking notes should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
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  • Explanation: MiraCosta College: Lisa M. Lane’s “History of England Lecture: Reformations and Elizabethan England” Link: MiraCosta College: Lisa M. Lane’s “History of England Lecture: Reformations and Elizabethan England” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Click on the link to access this series of lectures about politics in Elizabethan England. Each written lecture can be listened to by right-clicking on the red arrow next to each topic heading. Then click “Open this Link” to listen to the lecture, or read along. The lectures sometimes offer links to other sites that present interesting information and may be helpful. Since this is only an overview of the time period, visiting these additional links is recommended for enrichment, but not required. At the end of all the lectures, there is a short self-check quiz for you to take. After you submit your answers, it will show you your results.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
               
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.1.2 Cultural Similarities and Differences   - Web Media: Open High School of Utah: “Elizabethan Marriage” Link: Open High School of Utah: “Elizabethan Marriage” (Flash)
 
Instructions: Click on the link, and watch this video about Elizabethan marriages. As you watch, make a list of similarities and differences in the weddings of Elizabethan times and weddings of today.
 
Watching the video and making a list should take approximately 10 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
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  • Explanation: Wikispaces: Elizabethantimes: “Elizabethan Times” Link: Wikispaces: Elizabethantimes: “Elizabethan Times” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Click on the link, and then click on the six different categories of Elizabethan life. Even though this site was created by eighth graders as a project, it is chock full of information. As you look over each section, take notes to learn more about the norms of Elizabethan times. Reading about what these students found in their research will help you better understand Shakespeare and the characters in Macbeth. After you have studied their research, you should pick six different things from Elizabethan times that you would like to learn more about, one from each of the categories. Fortunately, each of this site’s categories lists a resource page at the bottom, so that will give you a huge advantage for researching! Simply make lists of the information you discover from each category. As you research, notice if the class that developed this site made any mistakes in its research. Did the students cover each topic thoroughly?
     
    Studying each category and taking notes should take approximately 3 hours.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.1.3 Literary and Linguistic Traditions   6.1.3.1 Common Vocabulary Used   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Nathan Mattson’s “Reading Shakespeare” Link: SOPHIA: Nathan Mattson’s “Reading Shakespeare” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link, and watch the video for advice when reading Shakespeare’s plays. Be sure to take notes. These tips will help you better understand and enjoy the plays when you read them. There is also a list of commonly used Shakespeare vocabulary, as well as flash cards to study. Studying these flash cards will help you become more familiar with the vocabulary used in Macbeth. Write down this vocabulary list, and add to it as you discover other Shakespeare words. Finally, there is a fun interactive game at the end of the tutorial. Play it a few times and challenge yourself to learn the vocabulary.
 
Completing these activities should take approximately 45 minutes.
                              
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/7)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)

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6.1.3.2 Differences in Linguistic Structure/Syntax   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Brian Mead’s “Old English Pronouns” Link: SOPHIA: Brian Mead’s “Old English Pronouns” (Flash)
 
Instructions: Click on the link. The first video is a group assignment, so instead of watching that, you should write a few original sentences about what you had for dinner last night. Write the sentences as if a friend were going to read them. Next, watch the second video about old English pronouns. At the end of the second video, there is an assignment involving the activities from the first video. Complete this assignment using the sentences you wrote about what you had for dinner.
 
Watching the video and completing the activity should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
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  • Web Media: The English Faculty: Dr. Laurence Publicover’s “How Does Shakespeare Persuade Us That His Characters Are Using Real Speech? Pt. 1” and “How Does Shakespeare Persuade Us That His Characters Are Using Real Speech? Pt. 2” Link: The English Faculty: Dr. Laurence Publicover’s “How Does Shakespeare Persuade Us That His Characters Are Using Real Speech? Pt. 1” (Flash) and “How Does Shakespeare Persuade Us That His Characters Are Using Real Speech? Pt. 2” (Flash)
     
    Instructions: The two links above are parts 1 and 2 of a lecture. Click on the part 1 link and watch it; then, click on the part 2 link and finish the lecture. The speaker is discussing how the speech used in Shakespeare’s plays often seems artificial rather than natural. He explains that Shakespeare uses words as art, much like an opera uses music or a ballet uses dance. The speaker shows and explains many excellent examples from a variety of Shakespeare’s plays. This lecture should give you an appreciation for the unrhymed iambic pentameter that you will encounter throughout Macbeth.
     
    Watching both parts of this lecture should take approximately 20 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: The Open University: Tony Hill’s “Getting to Grips with Shakespearian Language” Link: The Open University: Tony Hill’s “Getting to Grips with Shakespearian Language” (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Click on the link, and watch this video for more advice when reading Shakespeare’s plays. The instructor especially stresses the opinion that students have to almost “go against” the way they have been taught to read. Look at your copy of Macbeth and practice reading the way Tony Hill suggests in the video. Does reading this way help you better understand the play? Is it easier to read without stopping at the end of every line? Practice reading this way several times, and continue to read in the same manner while you are reading Macbeth.
     
    Watching the video and practicing the reading should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.2 Introduction to Shakespeare   Shakespeare…the name alone provokes many feelings in students of English. Hopefully you have been exposed to at least one or two of his works by this time in your school career. Perhaps you have read and studied, or even seen, one of his many plays. Shakespeare is certainly known as a playwright, but he was also a poet and a businessman. This subunit will give you a glimpse into who Shakespeare was and share a small sampling of his sonnets. 

6.2.1 Biography   - Web Media: YouTube: Kathryn Starkey’s “Who Is Shakespeare?” Link: YouTube: Kathryn Starkey’s “Who Is Shakespeare?” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Click on the link, watch this video about Shakespeare’s life, and take notes. Do you believe Shakespeare wrote his plays? State your opinion about this in a paragraph.
 
Watching the video and writing a paragraph should take approximately 10 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/7)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)

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6.2.2 Literary Influence   - Reading: TV Tropes: “Creator: William Shakespeare” Link: TV Tropes: “Creator: William Shakespeare” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link, and read this piece, which discusses some of the influences Shakespeare has had on today’s writing and culture. List five influences from Shakespeare that you learn about from this reading.
 
Reading the material and making a list should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/5/)

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  • Web Media: 365 Days of Astronomy: Dr. Leslie Peterson and Dr. Mel Blake’s “November 29th: The Astronomy of Shakespeare” Link: 365 Days of Astronomy: Dr. Leslie Peterson and Dr. Mel Blake’s “November 29th: The Astronomy of Shakespeare” (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Click on the link, and listen to this podcast about how important astronomy was during Shakespeare’s time. The podcast gives several examples of Shakespeare’s work and shows the influence that astronomy had on his writing. Be sure to watch for references to astronomy as you read Macbeth.
     
    Listening to the podcast should take approximately 10 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: The English Faculty: Dr. Jane Rickard’s “Introduction to Shakespeare’s Texts—Part 1” and “Introduction to Shakespeare’s Texts—Part 2”

    Link: The English Faculty: Dr. Jane Rickard’s “Introduction to Shakespeare’s Texts—Part 1” (Flash) and “Introduction to Shakespeare’s Texts—Part 2” (Flash)
     

    Instructions: This is a two-part lecture giving insight into the way Shakespeare’s plays may have changed from his original manuscripts. Click on the “Part 1” link first, and watch the video. Then, click on the “Part 2” link, and finish watching the lecture. This lecture also addresses the different ways that modern editors have changed Shakespeare’s original manuscripts. Rickard shows some really neat examples from earlier editions of Shakespeare’s Hamlet, King Lear, and Romeo and Juliet. The discrepancies from edition to edition are relevant to the study of all of Shakespeare’s plays, including Macbeth. After listening to this lecture, please list at least three reasons that the text of Shakespeare’s plays may be different today than the text that was written during the Elizabethan era.
     
    Listening to both parts of the podcast should take approximately 25 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.2.3 Other Works   - Web Media: YouTube: Joseph Grow’s “A Theological Interpretation of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 116” Link: YouTube: Joseph Grow’s “A Theological Interpretation of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 116” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Click on the link for a reading and interpretation of Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 116.” The reader suggests that the sonnet would have been read during Elizabethan times with religion, probably Catholicism, in mind. Write a paragraph explaining why you agree or disagree with the reader’s interpretation. Use examples from the sonnet to support your explanation.
 
Watching the video and writing the paragraph should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/5/)

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  • Web Media: YouTube: Caspar33’s “Shakespeare: ‘When in Disgrace with Fortune’” Link: YouTube: Caspar33’s “Shakespeare: ‘When in Disgrace with Fortune’” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Click on the link for a reading of Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 29.” Listen to the sonnet and enjoy the views of the Thames River, ending with a close-up of the Globe Theater.
     
    Watching this video should take approximately 5 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: YouTube: A.J. Garber’s “Sonnet 20 by Shakespeare” Link: YouTube: A. J. Garber’s “Sonnet 20 by Shakespeare” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Click on the link. Before you begin the video, click on the “Show more” button. This will allow you to read the text of the sonnet. Also, you may want to refer back to the text if you choose this sonnet for the writing assignment at the end of this subunit. This is a reading of Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 20.”
     
    Watching the video should take approximately 5 minute.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: YouTube: A.J. Garber’s “Sonnet 19 by Shakespeare” Link: YouTube: A.J. Garber’s “Sonnet 19 by Shakespeare” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Click on the link. Before watching the video, click on the “Show more” button to display the text of the sonnet. This video is a reading of Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 19.”
     
    Watching the video should take approximately 5 minute.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: Interpreting a Shakespearean Sonnet Instructions: Now that you have listened to four of Shakespeare’s sonnets, you are going to take a closer look at one of them. For citing purposes, you need to choose between “Sonnet 19” or “Sonnet 20.” Remember, the written text of these sonnets can be found under the “Show more” button under each sonnet’s YouTube video. After you choose your favorite between the two, write a paragraph explaining what you think the sonnet is about. Be sure to cite supporting examples from the sonnet. Remember, as long as you can prove your opinion with examples, there is no “right” or “wrong” interpretation.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.3 Reading Macbeth   Now that you know a little about the Elizabethan era, Shakespeare, and how to successfully read a Shakespearean play, it’s time to read Macbeth. It is important to remember that Shakespeare did not write these plays to be read but to be performed on stage. You are going to read, annotate, and summarize the play one act and scene at a time. Then, after thoroughly analyzing its literary parts, you will better understand how the play functions as a whole. After studying the written text, watching the play will be an event to enjoy, just as Shakespeare intended.

6.3.1 Reading Comprehension   - Explanation: BetterLesson: Rachel Palevsky’s “Elements of Drama” Link: BetterLesson: Rachel Palevsky’s “Elements of Drama” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link, and then click on the “Download” button on the right side of the page. Read through the slideshow, taking notes about different elements found in drama. It will be helpful for you to be familiar with these terms while you read and analyze Macbeth.
 
Reading the slideshow and taking notes should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/5/)

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  • Interactive Lab: Open Source Shakespeare: William Shakespeare’s “The Tragedy of Macbeth” Link: Open Source Shakespeare: William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Click on the link, which takes you to The Tragedy of Macbeth page of this neat interactive website. From here, you will be able to click on any act or scene from the play and have it conveniently displayed. Then, you may choose to read, print, or save the view. Another useful tool is the ability to click on any character from the play to see all of that character’s speeches. These features will make studying the play much easier. Play with the different aspects of the site and become familiar with how to access scenes and character parts. The link to this site will be provided when you need to access the play to complete assignments. Also, it may be more convenient for you to use this site when referring to specific acts/scenes from Macbeth in your writing assignments.
     
    Familiarizing yourself with this site should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.3.1.1 Notes and Vocabulary for Understanding   - Activity: Wikispace Educator: “Shakespearian Glossary” Link:  Wikispace Educator: “Shakespearian Glossary” (HTML)
 
Instructions:  Click on the link above.  This is a list of some of the words commonly used in Shakespeare’s plays.  The words are listed on the left in blue, and when you click on one, the page will jump to a definition of that word.  Some of the definitions include an example sentence from one of Shakespeare’s plays that uses the word.  To help familiarize you with the words in this list, please try to use each of the words in an original sentence.  Read the sentences you write aloud either to yourself or to a friend so that you will hear the way the words sound in use.  This activity will hopefully make some of Shakespeare’s language less intimidating.
 
Completing this activity will take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/6/)

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6.3.1.2 Paraphrasing of Parts   - Web Media: Great Writer’s Inspire: “The Language of Shakespeare” Link:  Great Writer’s Inspire: “The Language of Shakespeare” (MP4)
 
Instructions:  Click on the link above and watch the video.  Notice the struggles that even actors and directors have when it comes to Shakespeare’s language and conveying its meaning.  Write down at least two things that the director or actors mention they do to help them get Shakespeare’s meanings across to audiences more successfully.
 
Watching this video and making a list will take approximately 10 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/5)

Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyright and terms of use
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6.3.1.3 Questions and Summaries for Each Act   - Explanation: BetterLesson: Ivy Weiskopf’s “Speed Through Revised” Link: BetterLesson: Ivy Weiskopf’s “Speed Through Revised” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link, and read through this brief summary of what happens in each act of Macbeth. Knowing the basic storyline will allow you to focus more on the literary aspects of the play. After reading the summary, write down any questions you may have about the play.
 
Reading the script summary and writing down questions should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)

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6.3.1.3.1 Act 1   - Interactive Lab: Open Source Shakespeare: Shakespeare’s “The Tragedy of Macbeth” and BetterLesson: Rachel Formy Duval’s “Macbeth Unit Sheet” Link: Open Source Shakespeare: Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth (HTML)
 
Link: BetterLesson: Rachel Formy Duval’s Macbeth Unit Sheet” (HTML)
 
Instructions:  Please click on the first link above to access the text.  Then, click on the second link to access the Macbeth packet.  This is a packet that includes pre-writing, activities, and a post-writing assignment for each scene.  You will use pages 1–9 of this packet while reading all five acts of Macbeth, so it is probably most convenient to print those nine pages.  If you would prefer, you may write down the questions/activity responses for each act as the course progresses and you reach each new act.
 
You will only need to address the Act I portion of the packet right now.  First, complete the pre-writing activity for Act I.  You will not need to take notes about Shakespeare and his life at this time since we have already covered that.  Next, scroll down to pages 8 and 9 of the packet. There you will find definitions for the dramatic terminology referred to in Scenes 1-3.  When the packet asks you to give a plot summary, please use the CLOSE read method.  This will help you when you have to write a literary analysis about Macbeth later!  Continue to work through the questions and activities after each scene you read in Act I.  Finally, complete the post-writing assignment.
 
Completing the Act I section of this packet will take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)

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6.3.1.3.2 Act 2   - Interactive Lab: Open Source Shakespeare: William Shakespeare’s “The Tragedy of Macbeth” and BetterLesson: Rachel Formy Duval’s “Macbeth Unit Sheet” Link: Open Source Shakespeare: William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth (HTML)
 
Link:  BetterLesson: Rachel Formy Duval’s Macbeth Unit Sheet” (HTML)
 
Instructions:  Click on the first link to access the text.  Then, click on the second link and scroll to Act 2 near the end of page 2 in the packet.   You will work your way through Act 2 just as you did in Act 1, beginning with the pre-writing, then completing the various scene activities, and ending with a post-writing assignment.  The only thing you need to omit from this section is the note-taking about the Great Chain of Being.  We covered that in the introductory material for this unit.  Remember to CLOSE read whenever you are summarizing lines or analyzing elements of this text.
 
Completing the Act 2 section of this packet will take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/7)

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6.3.1.3.3 Act 3   - Interactive Lab: Open Source Shakespeare: William Shakespeare’s “The Tragedy of Macbeth” and BetterLesson: Rachel Formy Duval’s “Macbeth Unit Sheet” Link: Open Source Shakespeare: William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth (HTML)
 
Link: BetterLesson: Rachel Formy Duval’s Macbeth Unit Sheet” (HTML)
 
Instructions:  Click on the link above.  You guessed it!  This time, you will complete all of the Act 3 activities, beginning in the middle of page 3 of the packet.  These assignments include a lot of plot summarization, so remember to CLOSE read as you summarize.  Working through these summaries may seem tedious and may require a little extra time, but you will reap the benefits when you are writing an analysis later.
 
Completing the activities in Act 3 will take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

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6.3.1.3.4 Act 4   - Interactive Lab: Open Source Shakespeare: William Shakespeare’s “The Tragedy of Macbeth” and BetterLesson: Rachel Formy Duval’s “Macbeth Unit Sheet” Link: Open Source Shakespeare: William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth (HTML)
 
Link: BetterLesson: Rachel Formy Duval’s Macbeth Unit Sheet” (HTML)
 
Instructions:  Click on the link above.  Go to the middle of page 4 in the packet and complete the activities for Act 4.  In question 1 you are asked to explain how a statement is ironic.  To review the definitions of dramatic irony and verbal irony, go to page 8 in the packet.  Other than that, just enjoy being creative and giving your opinion in this section.  Be sure to CLOSE read any lines you might have trouble interpreting.
 
Completing these activities will take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

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6.3.1.3.5 Act 5   - Reading: Open Source Shakespeare: William Shakespeare’s “The Tragedy of Macbeth” and BetterLesson: Rachel Formy Duval’s “Macbeth Unit Sheet” Link: Open Source Shakespeare: William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth (HTML)
 
Link: BetterLesson: Rachel Formy Duval’s “Macbeth Unit Sheet” (HTML)
 
Instructions:  Click on the link above.  The activities for Act 5 begin near the end of page 4.  Complete the two questions given for this act, and then CLOSE read all of Act 5.  This will help you to study for the Act 5 quiz and prepare you to write a literary analysis. 
 
Completing the activity and a CLOSE read of Act 5 will take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

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6.3.1.4 Viewing the Play Alongside Reading   6.3.1.4.1 Multiple Interpretations/Stagings   - Web Media: You Tube: “Orson Welles and The Federal Theatre Project’s 1936 ‘Voodoo’ Macbeth” Link: You Tube: “Orson Welles and The Federal Theatre Project’s 1936 ‘Voodoo’ Macbeth (YouTube)
 
Instructions:  Click on the link above and watch this interpretation of Macbeth.  When you have finished watching, write a paragraph about what you liked and did not like about this production compared to the original text that you studied.
 
Watching this video and writing the paragraph will take approximately 10 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2)

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  • Web Media: You Tube: utakata 56’s “Modern Macbeth” Link: You Tube: utakata 56’s “Modern Macbeth” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions:  Click on the link above.  Watch this modern take on Macbeth by some young English students.  When you have finished watching their production, write a paragraph comparing this production to the text that you studied.  Also, include your opinion about which of the video productions you think is a better interpretation.
     
    Watching this video and writing the paragraph will take approximately 20 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

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6.3.1.4.2 Comparing with the Text (informally)   - Interactive Lab: Internet Archive: Henry Irving’s “Macbeth, A Tragedy, by William Shakespeare” and Vimeo: N Motion Productions: Modesto Junior College’s adaptation by Michael Lynch: William Shakespeare’s Macbeth Link: Internet Archive: Henry Irving’s MacbethA Tragedy,by William Shakespeare” (HTML)
 
Link: Vimeo: N Motion Productions: Modesto Junior College’s adaptation by Michael Lynch: William Shakespeare’s Macbeth (Flash)
 
Instructions: Click on the first link to access the text of the play. When you are ready to begin reading, simply click on the book. Then, click on the page to turn to the next page. You will need to have a copy of the text of Macbeth available to informally compare the text to this particular production of Macbeth. You may use the text you have already annotated if you are not able to open this e-text in a smaller window while you are watching the play. Before you begin the video of the play, make yourself some popcorn, have your text in front of you, and follow along, but most of all, try to enjoy the show! After you have watched the play, write a paragraph explaining some of the obvious differences between the text of the play and this production.
 
Reading the text alongside the performance and writing a paragraph should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/5/)

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6.3.2 Character Development   - Explanation: BetterLesson: Amber Smith’s “List of Character Traits” Link: BetterLesson: Amber Smith’s “List of Character Traits” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link, and review this list of suggested words for describing the traits of a character. You may want to refer back to it for future character analysis assignments.
 
Reviewing the list should take approximately 5 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)

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6.3.2.1 Analyzing the Characters’ Psyches   - Activity: BetterLesson: Ivy Weiskopf’s “Macbeth’s 2nd Monologue” Link: BetterLesson: Ivy Weiskopf’s “Macbeth’s 2nd Monologue” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link. After translating (paraphrasing) and analyzing the monologue as indicated in the directions, write a paragraph explaining what you believe Macbeth’s state of mind is at this point. Have you ever been in a situation like Macbeth, where one event leads to another and another and another? Or maybe you can think of a movie or television character who has been in a similar “out of control” situation. What thoughts are processed as the events of the situation unfolded? Does one even think at all when placed in a “snowball effect” situation?
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/3)

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6.3.2.2 Analyzing Their Motivations/Desires/Goals   - Activity: BetterLesson: Amber Smith’s “Character Trait/Action Chart” Link: BetterLesson: Amber Smith’s “Character Trait/Action Chart” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link to access a chart that you may find helpful in analyzing various characters in Macbeth. Look over the chart and be familiar with its organization for use in future activities.
 
Reviewing the chart should take approximately 5 minute.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

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6.3.2.3 Identifying Key Quotes and Actions   - Web Media: St. Columba’s College: “Macbeth 2: Act 1 Scene 2—‘Disdaining Fortune’” Link: St. Columba’s College: “Macbeth 2: Act 1 Scene 2—‘Disdaining Fortune’” (Flash)
 
Instructions: Click on the link for another analysis using the iPad “ShowMe” app. These are so helpful for showing how to annotate. We will look at several of these analyses in this subunit about key quotes and actions. This analysis discusses how things seem one way in the play but are actually another.
 
Watching the analysis should take approximately 5 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/5)

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6.3.3 Thematic Elements   - Explanation: BetterLesson: Kevin Kloth’s “Theme, Notes” Link: BetterLesson: Kevin Kloth’s “Theme, Notes” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link. Before we begin looking at different themes in Macbeth, it is important to review exactly what a theme is and how it functions in the story. Take notes as you read through these slides. Be sure to list the suggestions for finding the theme in a story. At the end of the slides, there is an assignment about the movie, The Lion King. If you are not familiar with this movie, please search the web for a summary of the plot. Then, write a paragraph about what you think some possible themes are in The Lion King. Also, if you are familiar with the movie, be sure to mention the part or parts of the movie that helped reveal the theme.
 
Reading the slides, taking notes, and writing the paragraph should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

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6.3.3.1 Prophecy   - Web Media: St. Columba’s College: “Macbeth 7: Act 2 Scene 3—‘Expectation of Plenty’” Link: St. Columba’s College: “Macbeth 7: Act 2 Scene 3—‘Expectation of Plenty’” (Flash)
 
Instructions: Click on the link for another “ShowMe” presentation, which analyzes the Porter’s lines as they relate to the prophesy theme. Write a paragraph explaining how “the farmer hanging himself on the expectation of plenty” is a prophesy of what is to come for Macbeth.
 
Watching the analysis and writing the paragraph should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/5/)

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6.3.3.2 Ambition   - Explanation: Prezi: Kayla Monroe’s “Copy of Macbeth: Ambition” Link: Prezi: Kayla Monroe’s “Copy of Macbeth: Ambition” (Flash)
 
Instructions:  Please click on the link above.  This is a neat presentation that gives great examples of one of the most prominent themes in Macbeth: Ambition.  There are even specific quotes from the play used as supporting evidence.  View the presentation, noting the characters discussed and the evidence cited.  This is a good example of supporting your claims.
 
Viewing the presentation and taking notes will take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)

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  • Web Media: St. Columba’s College: “Macbeth 10: Act 3 Scene 1—‘To Be Thus Is Nothing’” Link: St. Columba’s College: “Macbeth 10: Act 3 Scene 1—‘To Be Thus Is Nothing’” (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Click on the link for another “ShowMe” presentation, which discusses Macbeth’s soliloquy in Act 3. After listening to the explanation of Macbeth’s fears, write a paragraph explaining how his moral decline feeds the theme of ambition in the play.
     
    Watching the analysis and writing the paragraph should take approximately 20 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

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  • Web Media: St. Columba’s College: “Macbeth 16: Act 4 Scene 1—‘Be it Thought and Done’” Link: St. Columba’s College: “Macbeth 16: Act 4 Scene 1—‘Be it Thought and Done’” (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Click on the link. This analysis of Macbeth trying to justify killing Macduff’s family suggests that Macbeth is now acting without any conscience or rationality. To borrow a phrase from Nike, Macbeth has adopted a “Just Do It!” attitude. Can you think of any characters from another book or movie that acted without thinking of consequences just to achieve an ambition? What was the result of their actions? Have you ever made a poor choice when using a “Just Do It” attitude? Write a paragraph explaining how “Just Do It” is often a good plan when playing a sport or trying to attain an athletic or creative goal. Then, write a paragraph explaining why Macbeth’s thoughtless actions to reach his ambition by doing things without thinking first will lead to his destruction. By writing these two paragraphs, you should be aware that ambition can be good or bad, depending on the situation and the steps you take to get what you want.
     
    Watching the analysis and writing the two paragraphs should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.3.3.3 Political Power   - Web Media: St. Columba’s College: “Macbeth 11: Act 3 Scene 1—‘The Worst Rank of Manhood’” Link: St. Columba’s College: “Macbeth 11: Act 3 Scene 1—‘The Worst Rank of Manhood’” (Flash)
 
Instructions: Click on the link for another “ShowMe” presentation, which compares Macbeth to the two murderers he hired to kill Banquo. Remember, Banquo is Macbeth’s dear friend! Will he stop at nothing to get to the top? Write a paragraph explaining how “the worst rank of manhood” applies both to the murderers and to Macbeth. Also, explain how Macbeth’s actions work to develop the political power theme in the play.
 
Watching the analysis and writing the paragraph should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/5/)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.3.3.4 Gender Roles   - Reading: BetterLesson: Susan Fields’s “Gender Stereotypes” Link: BetterLesson: Susan Fields’s “Gender Stereotypes” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link, and then click on the first link listed under Lesson Resources, titled “Slide show/Read aloud of Paper Bag Princess.” Listen to the story. What is the main difference in the Paper Bag Princess and a typical fairy tale princess? Do you think Lady Macbeth has any traits like those of the Paper Bag Princess? How is Lady Macbeth not like the Paper Bag Princess? Write a well-organized paragraph explaining Lady Macbeth’s role reversals in Macbeth. Be sure to cite examples from the play to support your writing.
 
Listening to the story and writing the paragraph should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/5/)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.3.3.5 Blood and Guilt   - Web Media: St. Columba’s College: “Macbeth 6: Act 2 Scene 2—‘A Little Water’” Link: St. Columba’s College: “Macbeth 6: Act 2 Scene 2—‘A Little Water’” (Flash)
 
Instructions: Click on the link for another “ShowMe” presentation, in which Macbeth is totally horrified at the blood on his hands and doesn’t think they will ever come clean—literally or figuratively! However, Lady Macbeth is totally together and says that “a little water clears us of this deed.” Blood is obviously present in this scene, but what about guilt? Write a paragraph explaining the differences in their reactions to the murder that has just been committed.
 
Watching the analysis and writing the paragraph should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/5/)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.4 Assessment of Reading   Assessment is more than simply evaluation. It is taking the things you have learned and showing what you can do with that knowledge. For this subunit, you will be applying your knowledge of Macbeth to various activities. This will help build your confidence and prove to yourself that you are capable of reading, understanding, and applying a Shakespeare play.

6.4.1 Multiple-Choice and Short-Answer Questions   - Checkpoint: BetterLesson: Ivy Weiskopf’s “Macbeth Final Exam” Link: BetterLesson: Ivy Weiskopf’s “Macbeth Final Exam” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link. You will need to download the test if you would like a hard copy; otherwise, just write your answers on paper. Complete this test to check your knowledge of basic facts and literary techniques used in Macbeth.
 
Completing this exam should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.4.1.1 Story Arch and Plot   - Interactive Lab: BetterLesson: Rachel Formy Duval’s “Macbeth Study Guide” Link: BetterLesson: Rachel Formy Duval’s “Macbeth Study Guide” (HTML)
 
Instructions:  Please click on the link above.  Complete these study questions covering all fives acts of Macbeth.  Completing these questions will allow you to review the play before starting the test and writing about the play.  You may want to reread passages from the play, using your CLOSE reading skills, when you need clarification.
 
Completing this study guide will take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

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6.4.1.2 Themes, Symbols, and Motifs   - Web Media: Open High School of Utah: “Motif, Imagery, Symbol, and Theme” Link: Open High School of Utah: “Motif, Imagery, Symbol, and Theme” (Flash)
 
Instructions: Click on the link, and watch this video about motifs, imagery, symbols, and themes. As a review of these terms, take notes as you watch the video. Then, write four different paragraphs showing how each element is used in Macbeth. You may refer back to your annotations from earlier assignments to find examples from the play to support your writing. You should have annotations about different motifs, imagery, symbols, and themes.
 
Watching the video, taking notes, and writing four paragraphs should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

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displayed on the webpage above.

6.4.1.3 Impact of Key Events and Quotes   - Activity: St. Columba’s College: “Podcast 10: Macbeth Revision VI—A Quotation Auto-Test” Link: St. Columba’s College: “Podcast 10: Macbeth Revision VI—A Quotation Auto-Test” (HTML & Flash)
 
Instructions: Click on the link, and read the directions about how to take the quotation test using the podcast. Complete the auto-test, checking your answers as the podcast progresses.
 
Completing the auto-test per the directions should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/5/)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.4.2 Evaluation of a Play Production   6.4.2.1 Assessing the Quality of a Given Production of Macbeth   - Web Media: Wikispaces: studymacbeth’s “Macbeth Revived” Link: Wikispaces: studymacbeth’s “Macbeth Revived” (HTML & YouTube)
 
Instructions: Click on the link. The first clip on this site has been removed, but watch the other two clips. They are both interesting takes on Macbeth. Also, there are some examples of art interpretations from Macbeth. Choose one of the video clips or one of the art pieces and write a paragraph explaining why you think it is a good or bad interpretation of the play. Explain what you might have done differently. Note: If the links are broken, conduct a web search for art images and/or videos of Macbeth to write about.
 
Watching the video clips and writing the paragraph should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/7)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/5/)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Web Media: The Open University: Tony Hill’s “Lights, Camera, Action: Technology and Theatre” Link: The Open University: Tony Hill’s “Lights, Camera, Action: Technology and Theatre” (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Click on the link, and watch this video clip about the importance of using modern technology in Shakespeare productions to grab and keep the attention of today’s youth. What do you think about this topic? Do you enjoy watching things in black and white? Does it take something away from a “classic” if you make too many modern changes? Write a paragraph explaining why incorporating different forms of technology into Shakespeare’s plays is a good or bad practice. Be sure to support your opinions.
     
    Watching the video and writing the paragraph should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.4.2.2 Compare/Contrast with the Text (formally)   - Web Media: Vimeo: N Motion Productions: Modesto Junior College’s adaptation by Michael Lynch: William Shakespeare’s Macbeth Link: Vimeo: N Motion Productions: Modesto Junior College’s adaptation by Michael Lynch: William Shakespeare’s Macbeth (Flash)
 
Instructions: Click on the link to access the production of Macbeth that you enjoyed earlier with some popcorn. Now it’s time to trade the popcorn for your thinking cap and write a comparison and contrast essay about the differences in this production and the text of Shakespeare’s Macbeth. You need to rewatch this production, looking more closely at the text during the play. Note the differences with a highlighter as you read/watch. A Venn diagram is always a helpful tool for prewriting this type of essay. When you write your formal essay, be sure to cite the text to support your comparisons and contrasts.
 
Watching the play and writing a formal comparison and contrast essay should take approximately 4 hours.
                              
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/5/)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
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6.5 Multigenre Project   A “genre” means a category, and “multi“ means many. So this subunit is obviously about many categories, right? As a matter of fact, this unit discusses what you have learned about the content and themes of Shakespeare’s Macbeth. But this unit is also about expressing the things you have learned in personal, unique ways. Here your creativity gets to shine! You will create a collection (multi) of products from different creative categories (genres). This is where your work becomes your passion, where you choose the way you want to express your knowledge. You have worked hard dissecting Macbeth, and now you get to put all of it back together in a creative means of your choice. Enjoy!

Final Exam   - Final Exam: The Saylor Foundation’s “K12ELA010 Final Exam” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s K12ELA010 Final Exam (HTML)

 Instructions: Complete this exam.  

 Note: You must be logged into your Saylor Foundation School account
in order to access this exam. If you do not yet have an account, you
will be able to create one, free of charge, after clicking the link.