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K12ELA010: English Language Arts 10

Unit 5: Up from Slavery   After having learned rhetoric and studied examples of historical speeches, it is sensible for you to follow that by reading a longer, historically significant text. Up from Slavery, by Booker T. Washington, is a piece of influential nonfiction literature that provides a window into America’s history while allowing you to hone your reading comprehension, analysis, and evaluation skills.
 
You hopefully will find Washington’s autobiography compelling through a message of morality and portrayal of the human spirit. Additionally, after having honed your reading comprehension in previous units, you likely will spend less time on understanding and more time on higher order skills: application, analysis, and synthesis of the text.
 
Because you have already worked with a variety of prior texts, you will be expected to complete this book more autonomously: you will rely less on guided questions or given notes and more on your own annotations and research. After completing the reading, you will write a literary response paper on one of the novel’s overarching themes. This paper will follow the guidelines of previous writing assignments but allow more room for individual thought and direction, empowering you to take control and responsibility for your writing.

Unit 5 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take approximately 49 hours:
 
☐    Subunit 5.1: 5 hours
 
☐    Subunit 5.2: 19 hours
 
☐    Subunit 5.3: 17 hours
 
☐    Subunit 5.4: 8 hours

Unit5 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to: - create cogent, detailed, analytical responses to a text – i.e., persuasive writing, research-based expository writing, and literary analysis; - identify and evaluate the key elements, terminology, and traditions of literature; - analyze historical fiction and nonfiction texts within their social context, and evaluate them for their effectiveness and real-world implications; and - critically evaluate and critique ideas presented in a narrative or persuasive text.

Standards Addressed (Common Core): - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.7 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9

5.1 Setting and Context   Understanding when and where something happens is an integral part of nonfiction literary analysis. The circumstances surrounding the literary work are displayed either literally or figuratively based on the setting and context in which the work is composed. Often, the literary work exists as a direct result of the setting and context, so it is crucial to be familiar with the time period and events that may have inspired the author to put pen to paper.

5.1.1 1800s America   - Explanation: Wikipedia: “Timeline of United States History” Link: Wikipedia: “Timeline of United States History” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Scroll down to the section on the 19th century and read through all of the listed events in the timeline. Knowing about what was going on in America during the 1800s will help you better understand the setting of Up from Slavery. After reading through the timeline, make a list of what you believe are the top ten events from the 1800s in America.
 
Reading through this timeline and making the list should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/7)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/). It is
attributed to Wikipedia, and the original version can be found
[here](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_United_States_history).

5.1.2 The Slave Trade   - Web Media: YouTube: seguGeschichte’s “Atlantic Slave Trade” Link: YouTube: seguGeschichte’s “Atlantic Slave Trade” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch this video, which provides an overview of the Atlantic slave trade and how slavery made its way to America. Do not complete “Task 1,” discussed at the beginning of the video, but do complete “Task 2” at the end of the video. This will help you recognize some different points of view about slavery.
 
Watching this video and completing the task should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/7/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to seguGeschichte, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvDDpa-6LLk).

5.1.3 The Abolition Movement   - Web Media: YouTube: David Blight’s “Anti-Slavery Movements Pt. 1” Link: YouTube: David Blight’s “Anti-Slavery Movements Pt. 1” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Click on the link to watch this informative video about the beginnings of abolition in America.
 
Watching this video should take approximately 40 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/7/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
  • Web Media: YouTube: David Blight’s “Anti-Slavery Movements Pt. 2” Link: YouTube: David Blight’s “Anti-Slavery Movements Pt. 2” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Watch this continuation of David Blight’s lecture about abolition. After viewing both parts of this lecture, please write a paragraph summarizing what you have learned so far about abolition. Is it a movement that only involved slaves? Did it only involve women?
     
    Watching this video and writing the paragraph should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

  • Web Media: YouTube: David Blight’s “Anti-Slavery Movements Pt. 3” Link: YouTube: David Blight’s “Anti-Slavery Movements Pt. 3” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Watch this conclusion of David Blight’s lecture about abolition. After watching this video, what are your thoughts about things like the fugitive slave laws? How did Stowe’s novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, send a radical message to America? How did the Northerners view the novel? The Southerners? Write down your answers to these questions and think about how this novel helped to spark the American Civil War.
     
    Watching this video and answering the questions above should take approximately 20 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

  • Web Media: YouTube: EMS History: “The Abolitionists” Link: YouTube: EMS History: “The Abolitionists” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Watch this video, which discusses four of the first abolitionists. Think about the motivation of each of these abolitionists. Were they motivated by the same thing? Were they motivated by different things? Write down the abolitionists names mentioned in this video and tell what motivated them. For example, were they motivated to fight for abolition because of their beliefs about education, Christianity, morals, personal experiences, and so forth?
     
    Watching this video and answering the questions above should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. It is attributed to EMS History, and the original version can be found here.

5.2 Reading Up from Slavery   Up from Slavery is the autobiography of Booker T. Washington. This nonfiction account of Washington’s life is an excellent selection that exemplifies knowledge and lifelong learning as a definite path to success. It is longer than the other pieces we have read, and you will use your annotation and active reading skills to complete the thematic essay in the final subunit.

  • Reading: Project Gutenberg: Booker T. Washington’s Up from Slavery (text) and Internet Archive: LibriVox: Booker T. Washington’s Up from Slavery (audio) Link: Project Gutenberg: Booker T. Washington’s Up from Slavery (text) and Internet Archive: LibriVox: Booker T. Washington’s Up from Slavery (audio)
     
    Instructions: Click on the first link to access the text of Washington’s autobiography. You must be able to annotate as you read in order to successfully write the thematic essay at the end of this subunit. If you would like to listen to the autobiography, the second link will take you to a page with a recording of the book. From that page, you are able to click on “play” for each individual chapter as you are ready. Again, you absolutely must annotate as you read.
     
    Reading this autobiography, not including annotations, should take approximately 8 hours.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

5.2.1 Reading Comprehension   5.2.1.1 Required Note-Taking/Annotations   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Tracking Comprehension” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Tracking Comprehension” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this tutorial and take notes about tracking comprehension. This information can be added to your annotation notes from previous units. Decide which form of annotation you will use while reading Up from Slavery.
 
Reading this tutorial, taking notes, and deciding upon your annotation preference should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/7/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/tracking-comprehension/tracking-comprehension-tutorial).

5.2.1.2 Reflective Questions   - Web Media: BetterLesson: Sue Harmon’s “Nonfiction Reading Log” Link: BetterLesson: Sue Harmon’s “Nonfiction Reading Log” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Use this worksheet to help you reflect on your reading. Please follow the directions on the sheet and complete this reading log about Up from Slavery.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/7/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Sue Harmon, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/19608/nonfiction-reading-log).

5.2.1.3 Character Development   - Reading: Library of Congress: African American Perspectives: Pamphlets from the Daniel A. P. Murray Collection, 1818–1907: “Address of Booker T. Washington, delivered at the alumni dinner of Harvard University (Cambridge, Mass.) June 24, 1896: after receiving the honorary degree of ‘Master of Arts’” Link: Library of Congress: African American Perspectives: Pamphlets from the Daniel A. P. Murray Collection, 1818–1907: “Address of Booker T. Washington, delivered at the alumni dinner of Harvard University (Cambridge, Mass.) June 24, 1896: after receiving the honorary degree of ‘Master of Arts’” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read the commentary about Washington’s address; then read the text of the address. Afterwards, write a paragraph giving a description of Booker T. Washington’s character. Give specific examples from the reading that helped to form your opinion of Washington’s character.
 
Reading this material and writing the paragraph should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)

Terms of Use: This resource is in the public domain.

5.2.1.4 Washington’s Coming-of-Age   - Web Media: Vimeo: Sheena B. Screen’s “Black History 2011: “Interview with Relative of Booker T. Washington” Link: Vimeo: Sheena B. Screen’s “Black History 2011: “Interview with Relative of Booker T. Washington” (Adobe Flash)
 
Instructions: Watch this interview with the great-grandson of Booker T. Washington. He discusses some of the accomplishments of Washington and his misunderstood views about segregation.
 
Watching this video should take approximately 5 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/7/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to Sheena B. Screen, and the original version can be
found [here](http://vimeo.com/26549793).

5.2.1.5 Washington’s Obstacles/Challenges   - Interactive Lab: National Park Service: “Booker T. Washington: Building a University” Link: National Park Service: “Booker T. Washington: Building a University” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this information and write a paragraph explaining how Washington was able to overcome the obstacle of being the principal of a new university with no buildings. What character traits contributed to his success? Be sure to include evidence from the reading to support your writing.
 
Reading this material and writing the paragraph should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/7/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is in the public domain.

5.2.1.6 The Development of Themes and Issues   - Activity: BetterLesson: Katy Byrns’ “4 Step Nonfiction Book Study” Link: BetterLesson: Katy Byrns’ “4 Step Nonfiction Book Study” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This activity will help you focus on themes in the book. Follow the directions on the handout. A “feature” in the book refers to charts, graphs, photographs, and so forth, that may have helped you better understand something in the book.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/7/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Katy Byrns, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/123734/4-step-non-fiction-book-study).

5.2.1.7 The Book’s Message   - Web Media: YouTube: Senia Lovely’s “Up from Slavery” Link: YouTube: Senia Lovely’s “Up from Slavery” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch this short introductory video. The images in this video will help you visualize some of the obstacles that Washington had to overcome. Some of these images are from a post-Washington time period, showing that some injustices continued well after his death. Some of the post-Washington images also show great progress since his death. Based on this video, write a paragraph stating whether you believe that most injustices from Washington’s era have been overcome or if they still exist? Describe the images from this video that influenced your opinion.
 
Watching this video and writing the paragraph should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Senia Lovely, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LIMC7yOXkLs).

5.2.2 Linking Life Experiences to Character   An autobiography, by definition, is the story of a person’s life written by that person. With that in mind, it only makes sense to look at some of Booker T. Washington’s life experiences to better understand how those experiences helped shape him into the man he became.

5.2.2.1 A Summary of Washington’s Formative Experiences   - Activity: Cornell University: Making of America Collection: The New England Magazine, Volume 0023, Issue 2 (Oct 1897): Thomas J. Calloway’s “Booker Washington and the Tuskegee Institute [pp. 131–146]” Link: Cornell University: Making of America Collection: The New England Magazine, Volume 0023, Issue 2 (Oct 1897): Thomas J. Calloway’s “Booker Washington and the Tuskegee Institute [pp. 131–146]” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This link will take you to page 131 of the article. Please read through page 146. Calloway’s account not only covers Washington and the Tuskegee Institute but also Washington’s humble beginnings and many of his experiences along his journey to Tuskegee. After reading this article, you will better understand the character of Booker T. Washington. Write a paragraph giving three examples from this article of life experiences Washington encountered that had an obvious impact on an action or decision he made later in life. In other words, show how Washington’s earlier experiences helped him make choices later. What did he learn from those early experiences, and how did he use that knowledge to pave the road to his success? Be sure to cite specific passages from the text to support your conclusions.
 
Reading this selection and writing the paragraph should take approximately 3 hours.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.2.2.2 Washington’s Views on Education and Politics   - Reading: Cornell University: Making of America Collection: The North American Review, Volume 0171, Issue 525 (August 1900): Booker T. Washington’s “Education Will Solve the Race Problem. A Reply [pp. 221–232]” Link: Cornell University: Making of America Collection: The North American Review, Volume 0171, Issue 525 (August 1900): Booker T. Washington’s “Education Will Solve the Race Problem. A Reply [pp. 221–232]” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This linke will take you to page 221 of the article. Please read the entire article, through page 232. This article gives Washington’s views on education. One statement Washington makes, in the first sentence of the last paragraph on page 225, seems to summarize his sentiments:
 
“In estimating the progress of a race, we should not consider alone the degree of success which has actually been attained, but also the obstacles which have been overcome in reaching that success.”
 
In a paragraph, explain what Washington means by this statement. Please give specific examples from this article to support your explanation.
 
Reading this article and writing the paragraph should take approximately 3 hours.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.2.2.3 Connecting Each Experience with Washington’s Views   - Activity: BetterLesson: Zenon Halatyn’s “Guided Reading: Up from Slavery Link: BetterLesson: Zenon Halatyn’s “Guided Reading: Up from Slavery (HTML)
 
Instructions: Complete this entire reading guide, which will help you organize your previous annotations. Disregard the “Day 1” and “Day 2” titles, as well as the various page numbers given, as they refer to a specific edition of Up from Slavery. Work through the questions at your own pace.
 
On the first page of the packet, under “Day 2”, there are four bulleted items. After completing the third and fourth items, write an essay explaining how three specific events from Booker T. Washington’s life helped develop his character in later life. This essay should be five paragraphs, and it should include specific examples for support.
 
Completing this packet and writing the essay should take approximately 3 hours.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Zenon Halatyn, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/1490628/guided-reading-up-from-slavery-us-s-docx?from=search).

5.3 Thematic Essay   There it is again…that dreaded “essay” word! By now you are getting really good at writing essays, so adding another type to your tool box will be a simple task. It’s probably no surprise that the thematic essay is an essay about a theme, or themes, in a literary work. So, this subunit will help you take the essay writing skills you have and refine them to write a thematic essay.

5.3.1 Interpreting a Metaphorical Prompt   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Extended Metaphor” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Extended Metaphor” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation, which explains extended metaphors and gives excellent examples with an excerpt from Shakespeare’s As You Like It. After taking notes and studying the example, think about other examples of extended metaphors that you have read or heard. A lot of songs use extended metaphors, like Kansas’s “Dust in the Wind,” or Sheryl Crow’s “Every Day Is a Winding Road.” What? You’ve never heard those songs? Well, after you Google them and read the lyrics, notice how each song’s lyrics apply the metaphor throughout the entire piece. Now, make a list of three current songs you have heard that include extended metaphors. After each song’s name, write an explanation about what the extended metaphor is in the song.
 
Reading this presentation, researching songs, and writing the explanations should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/). It
is attributed to Kathryn Reilly, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/extended-metaphor/extended-metaphor-tutorial).

5.3.2 Applying the Prompt to the Literature   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Targeted Re-Reading” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Targeted Re-Reading” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this information about how to focus on certain areas as you re-read for supporting evidence and other examples. Please take notes about “watch words” and study the examples given.
 
Reading this material and taking notes should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/targeted-re-reading/targeted-re-reading-tutorial).
  • Checkpoint: Checkpoint: Extended Metaphor and *Up from Slavery* Checkpoint: Now it’s time for you to put all of your writing skills to work again! You will need to reference the notes you have about writing an analysis and use the format that you used in earlier analysis assignments. Remember to sufficiently support your thesis by citing examples from the text. Finally, use your editing, revision, and proofreading skills to produce an awesome final draft of your paper.
     
    Booker T. Washington uses many metaphors in Up from Slavery. One of the metaphors that he uses in his speech, “The Atlanta Exposition Address,” is among his most famous. This speech and the following quote are found in Chapter XIV of Up from Slavery:
     
    “In all things that are purely social we can be as separate as the fingers, yet one as the hand in all things essential to mutual progress.”
     
    Write an analytical essay explaining how Washington uses the extended metaphor of this quote in his autobiography. Explain the meaning of the metaphor and give examples that show how this metaphor is extended, or carried out, in Up from Slavery.
     
    Completing this essay, from prewriting to final draft, should take approximately 2 hours.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

5.3.2.1 Washington’s Views on Education   - Reading: Cornell University: Making of America Collection: The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 0084, Issue 505 (November 1899): Booker T. Washington’s “The Case of the Negro [pp. 577–587]” Link: Cornell University: Making of America Collection: The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 0084, Issue 505 (November 1899): Booker T. Washington’s “The Case of the Negro [pp. 577–587]” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This link will take you to page 577 of an article written by Booker T. Washington. Read through page 587. After reading, you should better understand Washington’s views on education. In a paragraph, summarize what you believe to be his educational views.
 
Reading this article and writing the paragraph should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.3.2.2 The Importance of Education within the Book   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Analytical Paper: Thesis” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Analytical Paper: Thesis” (Adobe Flash)
 
Instructions: Watch this video about writing a thesis for an analytical paper. Since we have spent a great deal of time reading, studying, and annotating about Washington’s views on education, your thesis statement needs to include education as a prevalent theme in Up from Slavery. I have given you a jump-start by providing you with the following beginning of a thesis statement:
 
A prevailing theme in Booker T. Washington’s Up from Slavery is the importance of education to___________________________, _________________________, and ________________________________.
 
You do not have to use this particular thesis statement, but should you choose to use it, you would fill in the blanks with three different ways that the importance of education is stressed in Up from Slavery. If you need help in determining the three points you will use in your thesis statement, look over your annotations. When you have decided the three ways you believe education is stressed in Up from Slavery, please write your thesis statement.
 
Watching this video and formulating your thesis statement should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/analytical-paper-thesis/analytical-paper-thesis-tutorial).
  • Checkpoint: Checkpoint: Annotations and *Up from Slavery* Checkpoint: In order to validate your thesis statement, you need to make sure you have adequate textual support. At this point, you will re-read Up from Slavery, checking the annotations you have already made, and adding any others you find that will offer support for your thesis statement.
     
    Re-reading the book and checking you annotations should take approximately 8 hours.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

5.3.3 Using the Text to Support a Thesis on Education   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Analytical Paper: Organization” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Analytical Paper: Organization” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read through this presentation about organizing an analytical paper. This is a review, and you can use your notes from an earlier lesson if you prefer. Whichever organization method you choose, check your organization so far, and continue organizing your thoughts and annotations/proof from the text.
 
Reading this presentation and organizing your annotations should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/analytical-paper-organization/analytical-paper-organization-tutorial).
  • Explanation: Boundless: “Supporting a Thesis” Link: Boundless: “Supporting a Thesis” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read through these ideas to help you organize your annotations to support your thesis. This is especially helpful if you chose to use sticky notes in annotating. The information can be adapted to fit whichever annotation method you used. Then, use this method or one from a previous lesson to organize your annotations to support your thesis.
     
    Reading this information and organizing your annotations should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License. It is attributed to Boundless, and the original version can be found here.

  • Activity: Analytical Essay on *Up from Slavery* Now it’s time to take all of your prewriting and planning parts and put them together in an analytical paper. This is really the easy part! You already have your thesis statement, the proof you need to support it, and an organized plan for writing the information. Now it’s time to write! In five paragraphs, write an analytical paper explaining how the theme of the importance of education is prevalent in Booker T. Washington’s Up from Slavery. Be sure to include your thesis statement in the introduction of your paper, and give plenty of evidence from the text in your supporting paragraphs.
     
    Writing this essay should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

5.4 Supplemental Texts   Booker T. Washington’s message of success through education is also prevalent in the works of Maya Angelou. An inspiration to all who read her writing and hear her speak, Maya Angelou’s message includes not only success through education but also graciousness to all of the trials she has faced that have made her stronger and more grateful for her accomplishments.

5.4.1 Maya Angelou Poetry   - Web Media: YouTube: YangHaiying’s “Dr. Maya Angelou 01,” “Dr. Maya Angelou 02,” and “Dr. Maya Angelou 03” Link: YouTube: YangHaiying’s “Dr. Maya Angelou 01” (YouTube), “Dr. Maya Angelou 02” (YouTube), and “Dr. Maya Angelou 03” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch and listen to these three consecutive videos. This is an awesome opportunity to hear an amazing woman speak. When you are finished watching the videos, write a paragraph explaining what Maya Angelou means when she says to “be a rainbow in the cloud.” Also, explain how Angelou’s message and Booker T. Washington’s message are alike.
 
Watching these videos and writing the paragraph should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to YangHaiying, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8ZBmH3umJ4),
[here](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQmKY8c0xLI), and
[here](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVtCrkXqPEE).
  • Activity: BetterLesson: Brynna Herbert’s “Maya Angelou” Link: BetterLesson: Brynna Herbert’s “Maya Angelou” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Begin on page 2 with this brief biography of Maya Angelou. Then, complete the remainder of this packet about Maya Angelou and her poem, “Still I Rise.”
     
    Reading this material and completing the activity should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License. It is attributed to Brynna Herbert, and the original version can be found here.

  • Web Media: YouTube: Hans Ostrom’s “‘My Work and Me,’ by Maya Angelou” Link: YouTube: Hans Ostrom’s “‘My Work and Me,’ by Maya Angelou” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Watch this reading of one of Angelou’s poems. What is the message in this poem? How is this message like Washington’s message in Up from Slavery? Using a Venn diagram, compare and contrast “My Work and Me” and Up from Slavery.
     
    Watching this video and completing the compare/contrast activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. It is attributed to Hans Ostrom, and the original version can be found here.

5.4.2 The Universal Declaration of Human Rights   - Reading: United Nations: “The Universal Declaration of Human Rights” Link: United Nations: “The Universal Declaration of Human Rights” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read the Preamble and all 30 Articles of the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Then, click on the tabs at the top of the page to learn more about the document’s history and authors. Do you believe Booker T. Washington would have approved of this document? Explain why or why not in a paragraph.
 
Reading the declaration writing the paragraph should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/7/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage.

Extension Resources   - Reading: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou This autobiographical account of Angelou’s life as a young black girl in the American South in the 1930s and in California in the 1940s is a great complement to Up from Slavery.

  • Reading: A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini A story of struggle and love, this novel offers insights into life and history in Afghanistan.