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K12ELA010: English Language Arts 10

Unit 4: Speech and Rhetoric   To continue the analysis of texts, you will be introduced to a series of historically important speeches. These speeches vary in historical context, length, theme, and complexity. By reading, dissecting, and comparing these speeches, you will have an opportunity to learn three different pieces of curriculum.
 
First, you will hone your critical thinking skills through real-world examples of poignant writing. By reading and listening to historically significant speeches, you can analyze and evaluate the speakers’ words, intentions, and implications. As with any writing, this provides an opportunity for textual interpretation and response.
 
Second, working with excerpts from history will allow you to engage texts that are socially and politically significant. You can approach the material from the perspective of a modern viewer, looking back at culturally important events, or from the perspective of a critic, examining the speech’s influence on its time.
 
Finally, this medium will provide you with an avenue for learning the practice of rhetoric. You will come to understand how persuasive speech is used, how logical arguments are formed, and how to evaluate whether an argument is cogent or fallacious.

Unit 4 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take approximately 54 hours:
 
☐    Subunit 4.1: 2 hours
 
☐    Subunit 4.2: 9 hours
 
☐    Subunit 4.3: 7 hours
 
☐    Subunit 4.4: 5 hours
 
☐    Subunit 4.5: 8 hours
 
☐    Subunit 4.6: 5 hours
 
☐    Subunit 4.7: 8 hours
 
☐    Subunit 4.8: 4 hours
 
☐    Subunit 4.9: 6 hours

Unit4 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to: - analyze an author’s message, intent, and writing style, and respond critically using textual support; - analyze historical fiction and nonfiction texts within their social context, and evaluate them for their effectiveness and real-world implications; - explain a variety of historical events/settings/philosophies through the perspectives of noteworthy figures and how they have influenced today’s world; - compare and contrast the views and methodology of two writers/speakers, analyzing how these similarities and differences affect the message; and - critically evaluate and critique ideas presented in a narrative or persuasive text.

Standards Addressed (Common Core): - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.7 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.10 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3

4.1 Rhetoric   The one thing every smooth talker needs…call it a good pitch, the ability to sell ice cubes to an Eskimo, or maybe even the need to roll up your pants because stuff is getting deep. Rhetoric is the thing that a writer or speaker uses to keep the audience engaged and hopefully mesmerized in approval of whatever it is being said. It comes in many shapes and sizes, and knowing what rhetoric is can help you better read, write, and listen.

4.1.1 What Is Rhetoric?   - Web Media: YouTube: University of Amsterdam: “Rhetorical Theory” Link: YouTube: University of Amsterdam: “Rhetorical Theory” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch this video and take notes. Some of this is a review.
 
Watching this video and taking notes should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to the University of Amsterdam, and the original version
can be found [here](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVmw-JTknhI).

4.1.2 Rhetorical Devices and Styles   - Web Media: YouTube: Furman University: David Wright’s “Using the Rhetorical Triangle & Rhetorical Appeals” Link: YouTube: Furman University: David Wright’s “Using the Rhetorical Triangle & Rhetorical Appeals” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: This is a great video about Aristotle’s rhetorical triangle. It has several applicable examples and shows applications to a Ford commercial. Please take notes and answer the questions on paper as they are presented in the video.
 
Watching this video, taking notes, and answering the questions in the video should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to the David Wright, and the original version can be
found [here](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ODwmSYb3Tw).

4.1.3 Effective Use of Rhetoric   - Web Media: YouTube: Keele University: Matt Coombe-Boxall’s “How to Speak Well in Public: Rhetoric” Link: YouTube: Keele University: Matt Coombe-Boxall’s “How to Speak Well in Public: Rhetoric” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch this video, which is another look at rhetorical practices. The presenter gives good examples and suggests viewing a video of Boris Johnson, the mayor of London. The link doesn’t work from the video, but if you would like to view it, the link is displayed on the screen.
 
Watching this video should take approximately 5 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Matt Coombe-Boxall, and the original version can be
found [here](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QGM7o_7obyY).

4.2 Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy   An inaugural address is, well, a speech given at an inauguration. An inauguration is merely a ceremonial event that marks the official beginning of something. In America, a newly elected President of the United States gives an inaugural address at the official ceremony held in January after an election year. You will be studying the speech that John F. Kennedy gave at his inauguration in January 1961.

4.2.1 Setting and Context of the Speech   4.2.1.1 What Position was the United States in?   - Explanation: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum: “The Civil Rights Movement” Link: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum: “The Civil Rights Movement” (HTML)

 Instructions: Read this article about the civil rights movement at
the time of Kennedy’s speech. This informative site describes the
protests, freedom rides, and multiple integrations that were
happening at this time in history. Please be sure to read all three
pages at this link. Then, on the right-hand side of the page, click
on the top video, entitled “Report to the American People on Civil
Rights, 11 June 1963.” After that video is done, click on and watch
the video directly underneath it, entitled “Speech at the University
of Mississippi 1962.” Both videos will better help you understand
the situations in America when this speech occurred.  
    
 Reading this article and watching these two videos should take
approximately 1 hour.  
    
 Standards Assessed (*Common Core*):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is in the public domain.

4.2.1.2 What Might the President Wish to Convey?   - Activity: BetterLesson: Stacy Kurtz’s “JFK Speech” Link: BetterLesson: Stacy Kurtz’s “JFK Speech” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Re-read the inaugural speech on the second page of this handout. Answer the questions at the end of the speech, including evidence cited from the speech to support the statement in number 7.
 
Re-reading the speech and answering the questions with supporting evidence should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Stacy Kurtz, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/122740/51-jfk-speech?from=search).

4.2.2 Dissecting the Speech   4.2.2.1 Political Issues Mentioned   - Reading: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum: “Analyzing the Rhetoric of JFK’s Inaugural Address” Link: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum: “Analyzing the Rhetoric of JFK’s Inaugural Address” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Scroll to the fifth page of this resource, entitled “Poetry and Power: John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address.” Read this page to learn about political issues addressed in the speech. When you are finished, list three political issues that are mentioned in the speech. Then, annotate these three political issues in the speech.
 
Reading this material and identifying the political issues should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is in the public domain.

4.2.2.2 Plans or Promises for the Future   - Reading: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum: “Analyzing the Rhetoric of JFK’s Inaugural Address” Link: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum: “Analyzing the Rhetoric of JFK’s Inaugural Address” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This is the same resource you accessed above. Click on the link, and again scroll to the fifth page, entitled “Poetry and Power: John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address.” This time, list plans or promises for the future. Then, annotate these plans or promises in Kennedy’s speech. Do you think the plans Kennedy suggests or the promises he makes are attainable? Why or why not?
 
Reading this material and identifying Kennedy's plans and promises should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is in the public domain.

4.2.2.3 Rhetorical Devices Used   - Activity: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum: “Analyzing the Rhetoric of JFK’s Inaugural Address” Link: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum: “Analyzing the Rhetoric of JFK’s Inaugural Address" (PDF)
 
Instructions: Scroll to pages 9 and 10. Try to find examples of each type of rhetoric listed. Then, go to pages 11 and 12 to see how you did.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is in the public domain.

4.2.2.4 Purpose/Intent of Speech   - Activity: BetterLesson: Brian Thomas’ “Kennedy Inaugural Questions” Link: BetterLesson: Brian Thomas’ “Kennedy Inaugural Questions” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Answer each of these in-depth study questions about why Kennedy chose to use certain techniques in his speech.
 
Answering these questions should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Brian Thomas, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/622948/kennedy-inaugural-questions-docx?from=search).

4.3 “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death” by Patrick Henry   Quite serious about his liberty, Patrick Henry’s speeches are some of the most patriotic you will ever read. His use of rhetoric is something to write home about and definitely something you want to study!

4.3.1 Setting of the Revolutionary War   4.3.1.1 Who Was Patrick Henry?   - Explanation: The Patrick Henry Center for Individual Liberty: “A Short Biography of Patrick Henry” Link: The Patrick Henry Center for Individual Liberty: “A Short Biography of Patrick Henry” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this biography of Patrick Henry.
 
Reading this biography should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

4.3.1.2 Virginia's Role in The War   - Explanation: Curriki: Shmoop: “Jamestown: Early Colonial Virginia” Link: Curriki: Shmoop: “Jamestown: Early Colonial Virginia” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this information about Jamestown.
 
Reading this material should take approximately 5 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to Shmoop, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.curriki.org/xwiki/bin/view/Coll_Shmoop/JamestownEarlyColonialVirginia?bc=&viewer=info).

4.3.2 Dissecting the Speech   4.3.2.1 Clarifying Questions for Text Complexity   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Incorporating Questions in Academic Writing” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Incorporating Questions in Academic Writing” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation about incorporating questions in writing and taking notes. Are there any questions that could be used to help clarify Henry’s speech?
 
Reading this presentation and answering the question above should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). It
is attributed to Kathryn Reilly, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/incorporating-questions-in-academic-writing-tutorial).

4.3.2.2 Rhetoric Used   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “The Impact of Rhetorical Devices” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “The Impact of Rhetorical Devices” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation as a review of different types of rhetoric. Try to find an example of each type in Henry’s speech.
 
Reading this presentation and finding examples in the speech should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/). It
is attributed to Kathryn Reilly, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/the-impact-of-rhetorical-devices/the-impact-of-rhetorical-devices-tutorial).

4.3.2.3 Purpose of Speech and its Effectiveness   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Referencing the Author’s Purpose” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Referencing the Author’s Purpose” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this tutorial and take notes about author’s purpose. When you are finished, think about the purpose of Patrick Henry’s speech. Do you think it is to persuade, to inform, or to entertain? Or is it a combination? Write your thoughts in the format given in the tutorial: “The purpose of this speech is to (persuade, inform, entertain) WHO to do WHAT and WHY.”
 
Reading this tutorial, taking notes, and writing a purpose statement should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/referencing-the-authors-purpose/referencing-the-authors-purpose-tutorial).

4.3.3 Compare and Contrast with John F. Kennedy’s Speech   4.3.3.1 Difference in Purpose   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Sherryl Quellhorst’s “Determine Author’s Purpose in a Speech” Link: SOPHIA: Sherryl Quellhorst’s “Determine Author’s Purpose in a Speech” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Follow the four directions given for working through this lesson. In the last step, you predict what you believe King’s purpose probably is in his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. Through study, you have already determined the purpose of John F. Kennedy’s “Inaugural Address.” Also, by studying Patrick Henry’s speech, you know that his purpose was similar to Kennedy’s but also had a different purpose. In an essay, determine the purpose of Kennedy’s “Inaugural Address” and Patrick’s “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death” speech. Explain how you determined the purpose. Then, compare and contrast the purposes of the two speeches. Be sure to give supporting examples from the speeches.
 
Completing the lesson and writing the essay should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/). It is
attributed to Sherryl Quellhorst, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/determine-authors-purpose-in-a-speech-tutorial).

4.3.3.2 Difference in Style   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Diction” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Diction” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this tutorial about diction and take notes. The tutorial states that diction is part of an author’s style. With that in mind, find examples of the diction used by Henry in his speech and explain how it defines his style.
 
Then, using Kennedy’s inauguration speech, find examples of the diction he used and explain how it defines his style.
 
Finally, in a comparison/contrast essay, explain how the style of Patrick Henry’s speech and John F. Kennedy’s speech are alike and different.
 
Reading the tutorial about diction, finding examples in both speeches, and writing the comparison/contrast essay should take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/diction/diction-tutorial).

4.4 Speech from Alexander the Great   Alexander the Great became king at the young age of 20 and had conquered most of the Middle East by the time he was 26. He has been called a military genius, and he definitely didn’t have any self-esteem problems. I suppose a bit of narcissism is required if one is to conquer the world. More importantly, at least for our study of his great speech to his tiring troops, Alexander the Great was an actual student of Aristotle. With the instruction of such a great philosopher, no wonder his speech is full of great rhetorical devices for us to study!

  • Reading: Internet Archive: E. J. Chinnock’s translation of Arrian the Nicomedian’s The Anabasis of Alexander; Or, The History of the Wars and Conquests of Alexander the Great: “Alexander’s Speech” Link: Internet Archive: E. J. Chinnock’s translation of Arrian the Nicomedian’s The Anabasis of Alexander; Or, The History of the Wars and Conquests of Alexander the Great: “Alexander’s Speech” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Click on the link, which will take you directly to page 383 in the text, Chapter IX, “Alexander’s Speech.” Read the entire speech, which ends near the end of page 387. You should print a copy of these pages if possible, as you will need a hard copy to annotate.
     
    Also, if you would like to hear Alexander’s speech, there are numerous YouTube videos with excerpts from movies. I encourage you to go to YouTube and listen to some of them. You can find them by searching for “Alexander the Great speech.”
     
    Reading the speech should take you approximately 5 minutes.
     
    Standards Assessed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

4.4.1 Alexander’s Conquests and Wars   - Web Media: YouTube: The Cloud Biography: “Alexander the Great Biography” Link: YouTube: The Cloud Biography: “Alexander the Great Biography” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch this video biography of Alexander the Great. This will provide a synopsis of who Alexander was and a visual of the expanse of his reign.
 
Watching this video should take approximately 2 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core)

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/7)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

4.4.2 Understanding the Speech through Key Parts   4.4.2.1 Identifying the Main Argument   - Explanation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Speeches” Link: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Speeches” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this handout about effective speeches and take notes. Think about the techniques discussed in this handout, and then re-read Alexander the Great’s speech. What do you think is his main argument? Do you believe he effectively communicated this argument?
 
Reading this handout, taking notes, and re-reading and analyzing the speech should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/). It is
attributed to The Writing Center, and the original version can be
found [here](http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/speeches/).

4.4.2.2 Identifying the Speaker's Intent   - Explanation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Speeches” Link: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Speeches” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This is the handout that you previously read to determine the main argument in Alexander’s speech. Re-read the section entitled “What’s Your Purpose?” Now, think about Alexander’s speech and decide what you believe is his intent or purpose. What exactly does he want his audience to do or say as a result of this speech?
 
Reading the material and analyzing Alexander’s purpose should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/). It is
attributed to The Writing Center, and the original version can be
found [here](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/).

4.4.3 Rhetoric Used   4.4.3.1 Style and Structure of Language   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Nichole Carter’s “Analyzing Persuasive Writing” Link: SOPHIA: Nichole Carter’s “Analyzing Persuasive Writing” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch this video. The information here is mostly review, but please either take out and refresh your notes on rhetoric or take new notes from this presentation.
 
Watching this presentation should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to Nichole Carter, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/analyzing-persuasive-writing-persuasive-intro-para-tutorial).

4.4.3.2 Supporting Points for Argument   - Activity: BetterLesson: Susan Fields’ “Persuasive Strategy Definitions” Link: BetterLesson: Susan Fields’ “Persuasive Strategy Definitions” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read these definitions of different persuasive strategies. Then, read through Alexander the Great’s speech again and annotate the various strategies used in his speech. You should use different colored highlighters for each type and highlight the specific examples as you come across them in reading the speech. Does Alexander use all of the strategies? How many different strategies does he use?
 
Reading this material and annotating the text of the speech should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Susan Fields, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/167321/persuasive-persuasive-strategy-definitions-doc).

4.4.4 Comparison to Henry's Speech   4.4.4.1 Literal and Figurative Call to Arms   - Web Media: BetterLesson: New Orleans Collegiate Academies: “Figurative Language Rap” Link: BetterLesson: New Orleans Collegiate Academies: “Figurative Language Rap” (Adobe Flash)
 
Instructions: Watch this video, which is a rap about figurative language.
 
Watching this video should take approximately 3 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to New Orleans Collegiate Academies, and the original
version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/168681/classwork-figurative-language-rap-mp3).
  • Explanation: BetterLesson: Uplift High School ELA: “Figurative Language” Link: BetterLesson: Uplift High School ELA: “Figurative Language” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this presentation and take notes on each type of figurative language. Next, get out your hard copy of Alexander the Great’s speech and Patrick Henry’s “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death” speech.
     
    Read through each speech, and find examples that show a “call to arms.” You will need to find three literal examples and three figurative examples from each speech, so you will have a total of 12 examples, six from each speech. When you find the figurative examples, label the type of figurative language being used.
     
    Reading through this presentation, taking notes, and finding literal and figurative examples of a “call to arm” in both speeches should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Assessed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. It is attributed to Uplift High School ELA, and the original version can be found here.

4.4.4.2 Rewards and Promises for War   - Explanation: BetterLesson: Meredith Newlin’s “Basic Outline for the 4 Paragraph Comparative Essay” Link: BetterLesson: Meredith Newlin’s “Basic Outline for the 4 Paragraph Comparative Essay” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Look at the second outline format shown here, entitled “How to Outline the Body Paragraphs by Element of Literature.” Using this format, you will write a four paragraph comparative essay that compares the call to arms and the rewards and promises for war in Alexander the Great’s speech with the call to arms and the rewards and promises for war in Patrick Henry’s “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death” speech. So, in the place of Element #1 and Element #2 in the outline, you will have “Call to Arms” and “Rewards and Promises for War,” respectively.
 
Creating the outline and writing the essay should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Meredith Newlin, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/560875/basic-outline-for-the-4-paragraph-comparative-essay-doc?from=search).

4.5 “The Ballot or the Bullet” by Malcolm X   So far in this unit, we have read and listened to speeches with patriotic themes and positive tones about coming together and fighting for common goals. Malcolm X, born Malcolm Little, will show us a different kind of speech. His skills as an orator are equally as elegant as any we have studied so far, but his militant tone and use of extremist rhetoric to deliver his message offer a different kind of speech than we have seen so far.

4.5.1 Historical Context and Race Relations   4.5.1.1 Who Was Malcolm X?   - Explanation: BetterLesson: Marsha Bannister’s “Malcolm X” Link: BetterLesson: Marsha Bannister’s “Malcolm X” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Under “Units and Lessons,” click on “Malcolm X.” Three resources will be listed. Click on the first resource and download it. Finally, read the document and look at the photographs to learn a little about Malcolm X.
 
Reading this document should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

4.5.1.2 Compare/Contrast with Martin Luther King Jr.’s Role   - Web Media: YouTube: The Cloud Biography: “Martin Luther King Jr. Biography” Link: YouTube: The Cloud Biography: “Martin Luther King Jr. Biography” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch this video for a brief summary of King's life and role in the civil rights movement.
 
Watching this video should take approximately 2 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

4.5.2 Dissecting the Text   4.5.2.1 The Speaker’s Tone   - Activity: BetterLesson: Marsha Bannister’s “The Ballot or the Bullet Part 2” Link: BetterLesson: Marsha Bannister’s “The Ballot or the Bullet Part 2” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Under “Units and Lessons,” click on “Malcolm X.” Three resources will be listed. Click on the second resource. There are five discussion questions in this activity. You are to support each of your answers with evidence from the text of “The Ballot or the Bullet” speech. After you have completed this activity, look over all of the evidence you used for support. Based on this evidence, and from having read the speech, what tone do you believe Malcolm X uses in this speech?
 
Completing the discussion questions with evidence from the text and determining the tone should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Marsha Bannister, and the original version can be
found [here](http://betterlesson.com/course/41013/malcolm-x).

4.5.2.2 Establishing the Setting   - Explanation: YouTube: David Hunter’s “Elements of a Story—Setting” Link: YouTube: David Hunter’s “Elements of a Story—Setting” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch this short review about setting and the impact it has on a story. The same applies to a speech. With that in mind, write a paragraph describing the setting of Malcolm X’s speech and the influence it has on the speech.
 
Watching this video and writing the paragraph should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to David Hunter, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qvOxfLauKY).

4.5.2.3 The Ultimatum   - Explanation: Search Dictionaries: “Definition of Ultimatum Link: Search Dictionaries: “Definition of Ultimatum (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this definition. Then, write a paragraph about what you believe is the ultimatum in “The Ballot or the Bullet.” Be sure to cite specific examples from the speech to support your belief.
 
Reading this definition and writing the paragraph with examples should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licesned under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/). It is
attributed to Search Dictionaries, and the original version can be
found [here](http://www.omnilexica.com/?q=ultimatum).

4.5.2.4 How Delivery Affects the Message   - Explanation: BetterLesson: Brian Crosby’s “Must Have Qualities for a Good Public Speaker” Link: BetterLesson: Brian Crosby’s “Must Have Qualities for a Good Public Speaker” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read about each of the qualities that a good public speaker should have. Unfortunately, you are only able to listen to “The Ballot or the Bullet,” so you can’t assess all of the qualities listed. Find examples from the speech of each of the qualities except eye contact, body language, and facial expressions. Give specific examples from the speech when you find one of the other qualities listed. Based on your findings, write a paragraph stating whether you believe Malcolm X is a good public speaker. Cite specific examples to support your statements. Remember, you don’t have to agree with a speaker in order for that individual to be considered a good speaker.
 
After completing the paragraph about the Malcolm X speech, think of a speaker you have not only heard before but also seen. It may be one from an earlier subunit, like John F. Kennedy. Or you may choose one from an earlier unit, like Ayn Rand or John Lewis. You can even choose someone from a YouTube video as they deliver a speech. When you have chosen a speaker, find examples of the qualities a good public speaker should have. This time, you will be able to include eye contact, body language, and facial expressions. Cite specific examples of each quality you see or hear. Write a paragraph explaining the importance of eye contact, body language, and facial expressions, giving specific examples from the list you made. Is a speech better if you can also observe the speaker?
 
Reading this handout and completing these activities should take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Brian Crosby, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/161761/5-16-11-qualities-of-good-public-speaking-docx?from=search).

4.5.3 Compare with Other “Call to Arms” Speeches   - Activity: BetterLesson: Melissa Oliver’s “Comparing and Contrasting Across Three Stories” Link: BetterLesson: Melissa Oliver’s “Comparing and Contrasting Across Three Stories” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Use this compare/contrast chart to compare Malcolm X’s speech to two of the other “call to arms” speeches. You will compare it to Patrick Henry’s “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death” speech and Alexander the Great’s speech to his troops. The title of each speech will be filled in across the top of the chart and the various characteristics you are addressing in the speeches will be filled in down the left side of the chart. So you will replace “characters,” “settings,” and “problems/solutions” with the following: “tone used in the speech,” “purpose/objective of the speech,” and “persuasive techniques used in the speech.”
 
After you have completed the comparison chart, write an essay comparing the three speeches. You may refer back to the outline form in subunit 4.4.4.2 for planning this essay.
 
Completing the comparison chart and writing the essay should take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Melissa Oliver, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/88414/comparing-and-contrasting-across-three-stories-resource?from=search).

4.6 “We Never Quarrel about Religion” by Red Jacket   Like Malcolm X, Red Jacket justifiably felt just a little abused by the white man. Red Jacket’s speech, however, has a much kinder, gentler message. It’s really important to know what is happening to the Native Americans during the time of this speech. Pay extra attention to the historical background provided and consider the situation as you study this speech.

4.6.1 Position of Native Americans in the Early 1800s   - Web Media: YouTube: Eric Benson’s “Digital Storytelling” Link: YouTube: Eric Benson’s “Digital Storytelling” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch this video, which is a short summary of the plight Native Americans faced in the 1800s. This will help you better understand what Red Jacket is speaking about.
 
Watching this video should take approximately 3 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Eric Benson, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5scYGvhPxfw).

4.6.2 Dissecting the Text   4.6.2.1 Speaker versus the Audience   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Melissa Stephenson’s “Audience and Writing Style” Link: SOPHIA: Melissa Stephenson’s “Audience and Writing Style” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch this video. Even though this video addresses writing and audience, the information is applicable to speeches as well. Please take notes about the different kinds of audiences. After viewing the video, write down who you think Red Jacket is writing the speech for. Is this audience real or intended? General or specific? How do you think Red Jacket felt, knowing that his audience’s views and standards on the topic of religion were absolutely different than his? Does he effectively get his message across to his audience? Write a paragraph explaining who Red Jacket was writing for in his speech and why making a speech to this audience provided challenges for him.
 
Watching this video, taking notes, and writing the paragraph should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Melissa Stephenson, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/audience-and-writing-style/audience-and-writing-style-tutorial).

4.6.2.2 Tone and Mood of the Speech   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Tone” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Tone” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch this presentation about tone. This is a review of tone and different kinds of tone words. What do you think the tone is in Red Jacket’s speech? Find examples from the speech to support your belief.
 
Watching this presentation, determining the tone in the speech, and citing examples should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/). It
is attributed to Kathryn Reilly, and the original version can be
found [here](http://www.sophia.org/tone/tone--2-tutorial).

4.6.2.3 Using Rhetoric   4.6.2.3.1 Effect of Repetition   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Emphasis: Repetition” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Emphasis: Repetition” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation on repetition, taking notes as you read. Then, find any examples of repetition in Red Jacket’s speech. Look for repeating words, phrases, or ideas. Remember to write down specific examples.
 
Reading this presentation, taking notes, and finding examples in the speech should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standard’s Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/). It
is attributed to Kathryn Reilly, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/emphasis-repetition/emphasis-repetition-tutorial).

4.6.2.3.2 Supporting Examples Given   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Incorporating Quotes in Writing” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Incorporating Quotes in Writing” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation about how to use quotes in writing. Most of this is a review and you should refer back to this video or past notes on using quotes. Using the examples that you listed in the repetition activity in subunit 4.6.2.3.1, write a paragraph about the use of repetition in Red Jacket’s speech. Incorporate quotes as supporting examples in your paragraph.
 
Reading this presentation, referring back to it for format, and writing a paragraph incorporating quotes should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/). It
is attributed to Kathryn Reilly, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/incorporating-quotes-in-writing/incorporating-quotes-in-writing-tutorial).

4.6.3 Effectiveness of Argument   - Explanation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Argument” Link: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Argument” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read through this handout and take notes. This is a great overview of what is required in writing an effective argument. It specifically mentions making a claim, providing evidence, and addressing counterarguments. Read Red Jacket’s speech again, looking for his claim, evidence, and counterarguments. Did he cover all of his bases? Is his argument effective? Write a paragraph showing why Red Jacket’s speech is or is not effective. Remember to properly incorporate any quotes you use as evidence.
 
Reading this handout, taking notes, and writing the paragraph showing the effectiveness of the speech with examples should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/). It is
attributed to The Writing Center, and the original version can be
found [here](http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/argument/).

4.7 The Perils of Indifference” by Elie Wiesel   It seems that the last portion of this unit has displayed one civil injustice after another. Like Malcolm X and Red Jacket, Elie Wiesel certainly suffered injustices. His, however, were not only civil injustices but also injustices against humanity. The story of his life experiences as a young boy during the Holocaust will be somewhat revealed to you in his background information. This moving speech will show you his passion for correcting humankind’s wrongs.

4.7.1 Context of the Speech   4.7.1.1 Elie Wiesel's History   - Activity: BetterLesson: Hannah Larkin’s “Elie Wiesel and Night Background” Link: BetterLesson: Hannah Larkin’s “Elie Wiesel and Night Background” (HTML)
 
Instructions: At the curriculum page, click on the course titled “elie wiesel.” Finally, click on the resource titled “Elie Wiesel and Night Background.” Go to page 2 of this packet and read Wiesel’s acceptance speech for the Nobel Peace Prize. On page 3, complete the activity about the speech. Go to page 5 and read the piece by Wiesel. When you are finished reading, complete the questions on page 6. These readings and activities will help you better understand where Wiesel “is coming from” and clarify the context of “The Perils of Indifference.”
 
Reading the selections and completing the activities should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

4.7.1.2 Turn of the Millennium   - Web Media: Internet Archive: Elie Wiesel’s “Must the Past Be Prologue?” Link: Internet Archive: Elie Wiesel’s “Must the Past Be Prologue?” (Adobe Flash)
 
Instructions: Watch this video. This interview from 1999 addresses Wiesel’s thoughts about the new millennium.
 
Watching this video should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

4.7.2 Dissecting the Text   4.7.2.1 Rhetoric Used   - Explanation: Prezi: Danielle Julian’s “‘The Perils of Indifference’ by Elie Wiesel: An Explanation of its Meaning and Purpose” Link: Prezi: Danielle Julian’s “‘The Perils of Indifference’ by Elie Wiesel: An Explanation of its Meaning and Purpose” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation. In the second to last slide, titled “Rhetorical Devices,” three devices are listed. It says that these devices are used by Wiesel in “The Perils of Indifference.” Please prove that these devices are used by giving specific examples from the text of the speech. Please find two examples of each type of rhetoric listed.
 
Reading this presentation and finding examples of rhetorical devices should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

4.7.2.2 Historical References and Allusions   - Explanation: BetterLesson: Julie Inwright’s “Holocaust Background” Link: BetterLesson: Julie Inwright’s “Holocaust Background” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation and take notes about the Holocaust. This will clarify some allusions used in Wiesel’s speech.
 
Reading this presentation and taking notes should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Julie Inwright, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/1568504/holocaust-background-ppt).

4.7.2.3 Analyzing Themes Established   4.7.2.3.1 Importance/Timeliness of the Message   - Explanation: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Setting and Theme” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Setting and Theme” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This presentation is referring to setting and theme in a story, but we are going to apply it to a speech. The main thing you need to take from this presentation is that the setting and the theme complement each other. The setting for “The Perils of Indifference” is at a White House lecture on the brink of the new millennium. There is a horrible situation akin to the Holocaust happening in Kosovo at the time of this speech. Many thousands of refugees were forced to flee Kosovo by the Serbian ethnic cleansing campaign. The plight of those who remained in Kosovo involved mass execution and other gross abuses of human rights, all too familiar to Elie Wiesel. With that information in mind, write a paragraph explaining the importance of Wiesel’s speech at this time.
 
Reading this presentation, applying it to the speech, and writing the paragraph should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to LaShanda Lawrence, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/setting-and-theme/setting-and-theme-tutorial).

4.7.2.3.2 Timelessness of the Message   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Common Themes” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Common Themes” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation, which lists ten common themes found in literature. Do any of these themes apply to “The Perils of Indifference”? Does more than one of them apply? Can you think of a theme for this speech that is not listed in the presentation?
 
Once you have determined the theme, or themes, in “The Perils of Indifference,” write an essay about the timelessness of the theme in this speech. What makes the theme one that will apply to all times, when it was delivered, today, and in the future?
 
Watching this presentation, determining the theme(s), and writing the essay should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/). It
is attributed to Kathryn Reilly, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/common-themes/common-themes-tutorial).

4.8 Logical Fallacies and Pitfalls   The speeches we have studied in this unit have been eloquently written and delivered. Most of them have been persuasive and used many different types of rhetorical devices. But did any of these eloquent speeches contain errors in reasoning? This subunit will address common fallacies in logic. We will study these fallacies and learn how they may weaken or strengthen arguments.

4.8.1 Common Fallacies   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Logical Fallacies” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Logical Fallacies” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read about the different types of fallacies found in logic. Please take notes about each type.
 
Reading this information and taking notes should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/logical-fallacies/logical-fallacies--2-tutorial).

4.8.2 Fallacies Used in the Given Speeches   4.8.2.1 How the Speeches Are Weakened by Logic   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Nichole Carter’s “Identifying Fallacies” Link: SOPHIA: Nichole Carter’s “Identifying Fallacies” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch this video about identifying fallacies and take notes. This video is geared toward debates, but the same fallacies apply to writing.
 
Watching this video and taking notes should take about 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to Nichole Carter, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/identifying-fallacies-debate-concept-5-tutorial).

4.8.2.2 How Speeches Are Strengthened by Logic   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Ms. K’s “Writing Arguments” Link: SOPHIA: Ms. K’s “Writing Arguments”
 
Instructions: Read this material, which begins with a discussion of writing good arguments and then moves to different types of persuasion. There are short videos about writing claims and impacts and acknowledging opposing views. Finally, the presentation ends with a slide show on three different ways to set up persuasive essays. This presentation is lengthy, but please work through everything on this webpage and take notes. The gist of the presentation is that strong, logical arguments will strengthen writing and speeches.
 
Reading and watching this presentation and taking notes should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Ms. K, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/writing-arguments-tutorial).

4.8.3 Choosing One Speech for Further Analysis   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Rebecca Oberg’s “Critical Reading as a Learning Strategy” Link: SOPHIA: Rebecca Oberg’s “Critical Reading as a Learning Strategy” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this information-filled presentation and take notes about how to be a critical reader. Then, please look back over all of the speeches from this unit. If you don’t already have a favorite from the speeches, it’s time to choose one. Once you have made your choice, take that speech and re-read it as a critical reader. This will be the speech that you analyze in the subunit below.
 
Reading through this presentation, taking notes, choosing a speech, and reading it critically should take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Rebecca Oberg, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/critical-reading-as-a-learning-strategy-tutorial).

4.9 Analyzing a Speech   It’s show time! In this final subunit, you get to strut your stuff! You will take the speech you chose as your favorite and critically analyze it in an essay. Easy, right? Of course it is…you have all the tools you need in your bag to write a perfect analysis, regardless of the speech you chose. Don’t be afraid to look back over any of the information you have read or watched, and you have some good notes to refer to if necessary. Good luck!

4.9.1 Researching the Setting of a Speech   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Real & Fictitious Settings” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Real & Fictitious Settings” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read through this presentation about real and fictitious settings. Of course, all of the settings in the speeches we read are real. This presentation offers a lot of perspective on those real settings. Does the setting in your speech take place in the recent past or long ago? Can you find your setting on a map? In a reference book? Does your speech’s setting lend authenticity to the speech?
 
Reading through this presentation and applying concepts to the speech should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/). It
is attributed to Kathryn Reilly, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/real-fictitious-settings/real-fictitious-settings-tutorial).

4.9.2 Identifying the Speech’s Strengths and Weaknesses   - Activity: BetterLesson: New Orleans Collegiate Academies: “Mad to Write: Rhetorical Analysis Essay” Link: BetterLesson: New Orleans Collegiate Academies: “Mad to Write: Rhetorical Analysis Essay” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Use this worksheet as a prewriting activity and annotate your speech for its use of rhetoric. Be sure to find specific examples from the speech and label the type of rhetoric used.
 
Completing this activity and writing a rhetorical analysis of the speech should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to New Orleans Collegiate Academies, and the original
version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/208420/mad-to-write-doc).

4.9.3 Evaluating the Speech’s Effectiveness and Influence   - Explanation: BetterLesson: New Orleans Collegiate Academies: “Process for Rhetorical Analysis” Link: BetterLesson: New Orleans Collegiate Academies: “Process for Rhetorical Analysis” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Use this handout as a guide for writing a rhetorical analysis essay evaluating your speech’s effectiveness and influence.
 
Completing this worksheet and writing the essay should take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/8)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/9-10/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to New Orleans Collegiate Academies, and the original
version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/208422/process-for-rhetorical-an-copy-doc).

Extension Resources   - Reading: Night by Elie Wiesel This novel is an account of what happened to Elie Wiesel during the Holocaust.

  • Reading: The World’s Greatest Speeches edited by Lewis Copeland, Lawrence W. Lamm, and Stephen J. McKenna This is a great collection of, well, the world’s greatest speeches. Each speech is introduced with an explanation of the historical context. It’s a great book to have on your shelf.