Loading...

K12ELA010: English Language Arts 10

Unit 3: *Anthem*   After having read a series of short stories, you will move on to alonger work of classic literature. Because the previous unit included fiction, the subsequent novel will also be fiction in order to easily connect with the given literary themes and elements.
 

Anthem is a novel with a strong focus on history, politics, and social commentary. The author, Ayn Rand, uses the story as a metaphor for her views on human morality—as it exists in the world versus how she believes it should be. In this way, Anthem is an excellent example of how literature can reflect and comment on the world around us.
 
While reading, you will identify and explain the literary devices used in the novel; you will infer the author’s intent and analyze how it is communicated; you will research the story’s context through supplemental texts and use this outside information as a lens for the story’s message; and finally, you will respond to the story’s themes in a way that is relevant to your own experiences.
 

Anthem will serve as the primary piece of fictional literature for this course. Although other novels and texts will be read, this novel serves as a powerful example of classic American literature. Later in the course, it will be compared and contrasted with works from other eras, genres, and locations.

Unit 3 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take approximately 54 hours:
 
☐    Subunit 3.1: 13 hours
 
☐    Subunit 3.2: 6 hours
 
☐    Subunit 3.3: 7 hours
 
☐    Subunit 3.4: 11 hours
 
☐    Subunit 3.5: 1 hour
 
☐    Subunit 3.6: 6 hours
 
☐    Subunit 3.7: 10 hours

Unit3 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to: - analyze an author’s message, intent, and writing style, and respond critically to it using textual support; - create cogent, detailed, analytical responses to a text, i.e., persuasive writing, research-based expository writing, and literary analysis; - analyze historical fiction and nonfiction texts within their social context, and evaluate them for their effectiveness and real-world implications.

Standards Addressed (Common Core): - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.7 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9

3.1 by Ayn Rand   This novella—a fancy name for a long short story—is another glimpse at a dystopian world. This society is so different from the one we know that “I” is not even a permissible word anymore. That makes reading this a bit challenging at first, but you will get used to it. Ayn Rand’s own philosophies about egoism and collectivism are evident throughout this story. You, I mean “We,” will better understand the symbols, tone, etc. in this story after spending some time listening to Ayn Rand discussing her philosophies. There is also a need to learn a bit about what philosophy is before we can really understand what Ayn Rand believes. The video clips in this unit are both informative and thought-provoking. They are also a bit humorous as you watch the cigarette smoke curling through the air on these old television interviews. That’s something most of you have never seen before! These philosophies are some pretty deep stuff. You have to really have your thinking cap fastened tightly. After you learn a bit about Rand’s life and ideas, keep those philosophies in mind as you read Anthem. “We” hope you enjoy this unit!

  • Reading: Project Gutenberg: Ayn Rand’s Anthem (text) and LibriVox: Ayn Rand’s Anthem (audio) Link: Project Gutenberg: Ayn Rand’s Anthem (text) and LibriVox: Ayn Rand’s Anthem (audio)
     
    Instructions: Click on the first link if you would like to read this short story. If you choose to listen, you may click on the second link, and choose the preferred audio download. You may also choose to read along with the audio. Whichever method you choose, these questions should be completed as you read the story. You will also need to annotate the text while reading. Remember to answer the “Anthem Question Packet” from above while you are reading. These questions will help guide your annotations, so answering them as you are reading will go hand-in-hand with annotating. The idea is for the question packet to lead the way and hopefully spark another concept for an annotation.
     
    Reading and/or listening to this short story should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Assessed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: BetterLesson: Anke al-Bataineh’s “Anthem Question Packet” Link: BetterLesson: Anke al-Bataineh’s “Anthem Question Packet” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: You will need to print these four pages of questions or write them down. Whichever method you choose, these questions should be completed as you read the story. They will help guide your reading, help with your annotations, and help you develop some ideas about the theme. The first page of the packet describes four different question categories. Study these different types, and as you work through this packet, be aware of which type of question you are answering. These categories represent different levels of thinking, and recognizing them and knowing how to properly respond to each is a valuable skill. You may omit the pre-reading Question 1, since it refers to a summary of the book that you don’t have access to with Gutenberg. The page numbers will not correspond with the Project Gutenberg reading, so be sure to write down the correct page numbers as you complete the questions. This will be very important when you are looking for textual evidence to support your writing!
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 2 hours.
     
    Standards Assessed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. It is attributed to Anke al-Bataineh, and the original version can be found here.

  • Activity: BetterLesson: Angela Q’s “Anthem questions” Link: BetterLesson: Angela Q’s Anthem questions” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: After reading Anthem, answer the first reading seven questions on this handout. These questions are repeated at the bottom of the sheet, but you only need to answer them the first time. These questions will help you reflect on your reading and organize your thoughts. Don’t be afraid to highlight and annotate as you answer these thought questions.
    Answering these reading questions should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Assessed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.1.1 Biography and Relevance in Literature   - Web Media: You Tube: Jose Marabotto’s “Ayn Rand Mike Wallace Interview 1959 part 1,” “Ayn Rand Mike Wallace Interview 1959 part 2,” and “Ayn Rand Mike Wallace Interview 1959 part 3” Link: YouTube: Jose Marabotto’s “Ayn Rand Mike Wallace Interview 1959 part 1” (YouTube), “Ayn Rand Mike Wallace Interview 1959 part 2” (YouTube), and “Ayn Rand Mike Wallace Interview 1959 part 3” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Click on each of the links to watch all three parts of this interview consecutively. Try to tune out the dated camera angles, look for the humorous cigarette smoke swirls, and just LISTEN to what Rand is explaining. This is actually the author speaking about her objectivism philosophies and beliefs. Pretty neat, huh? When you have finished watching the all three parts of the video, ask yourself what objectivism means. What is collectivism? Which one is Rand’s philosophy? If you aren’t quite sure, watch the three videos one more time, and write down some of the things Rand says about objectivism and collectivism. When you think you know the meaning of objectivism and collectivism, write a letter to a friend explaining what each of the terms mean and how Ayn Rand feels about both objectivism and collectivism. Also, tell your friend how you feel about each of the terms.
 
Watching these videos and writing the letter should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Web Media: Dotsub: Michael Paxton’s “A Sense of Life 1” Link: Dotsub: Michael Paxton’s “A Sense of Life 1” (Adobe Flash)
     
    Instructions: Watch this neat biography of Ayn Rand with pictures of her as a child with her family in Russia.
     
    Watching this video should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Assessed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License. It is attributed to Michael Paxton, and the original version can be found here.

  • Explanation: The Information Philosopher: “Ayn Rand” Link: The Information Philosopher: “Ayn Rand” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this webpage, which offers a discussion of who Ayn Rand was in philosophy circles and what her philosophy called objectivism involved.
     
    Reading this webpage should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Assessed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. It is attributed to The Information Philosopher, and the original verison can be found here.

3.1.2 Views on Philosophy and Morality   - Explanation: BetterLesson: Erin Brandvold’s “What Is Philosophy?” Link: BetterLesson: Erin Brandvold’s “What Is Philosophy?” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this definition of philosophy. Then read the political cartoon. In a sentence or two, explain why this cartoon is funny.
 
Reading and writing the sentence should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Erin Brandvold, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/104241/philosophy-definition).

3.1.3 Relevance to Modern America and Global Politics   - Web Media: Internet Archive: “Ayn Rand Collection” Link: Internet Archive: “Ayn Rand Collection” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Surprise! It’s that collection again! But these videos are in color and a bit easier to watch! You may still see some smoke curling up in the picture though. This time, you will watch videos 3, 4, and 5. Collectively (no pun intended), they are one interview. Rand talks more in this interview about objectivism and collectivism but also about her views on politics and religion. Hopefully, this will help you to understand her philosophies a little better. Again, if you continue to question what objectivism and collectivism are, please watch these twice, or three times!
 
Watching these videos should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.2 Writing Style   Some authors write in a very simple style. Others, such as Charles Dickens or William Faulkner, ramble on for an entire paragraph before they finally decide they might need to use some end punctuation. We discussed earlier in this course that style is multi-faceted. This subunit will involve the study of Ayn Rand’s style—her writing style, not her fashion style from those archived videos! As you learn more about Rand’s writing style, think about how it reflects her philosophies.

3.2.1 Anthem's “Simple” Tone   - Reading: BetterLesson: Jeff Maxim’s “TONE Practice Worksheet” Link: BetterLesson: Jeff Maxim’s “TONE Practice Worksheet” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This worksheet will help you pick out the tone in different pieces of literature. Please complete each section, and you only need to answer the questions that apply to tone on pages 3 and 4.
 
Completing this worksheet should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Jeff Maxim, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/lesson/314022/tone-workshop?from=search#/document/1379192/tone-practice-worksheet-doc?&_suid=136297596763704181683868542373).

3.2.2 Narrative Voice   3.2.2.1 The Impact of the Protagonist as Narrator   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “The Protagonist” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “The Protagonist” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation, taking notes as you go. Who is the protagonist in Anthem? How do you know? Which specific examples from the story can you find to prove it?
 
Reading this presentation and answering the questions above should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/). It
is attributed to Kathryn Reilly, and the original verison can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/the-protagonist/the-protagonist-tutorial).

3.2.2.2 Commonalities with Ancient Myths   - Explanation: BetterLesson: Sam Singer’s “Prometheus Homework Anthem Link: BetterLesson: Sam Singer’s “Prometheus Homework Anthem (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this handout about Prometheus. Why do you believe Rand chose the name Prometheus for Equality? Complete the essay at the end of the reading and cite at least two examples from Anthem to support your writing.
 
Reading the handout and writing the essay should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Sam Singer, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/336654/prometheus-hmwk-anthem-docx?from=search).

3.3 Societal Models   There are many different countries in the world, and each one adopts its own value system and method of choosing who is in charge and the limitations placed on those in charge. This subunit will talk about some of those societal models and their relation to Anthem.

3.3.1 Collectivism versus Individualism   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Marlene Johnson’s “Individualism & Collectivist” Link: SOPHIA: Marlene Johnson’s “Individualism & Collectivist” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch this video and take notes about individualism and collectivism. There are some definitions that may be helpful beneath the video. Can you think of ways that the concepts of either individualism or collectivism are obvious in Anthem? List a few specific examples from the story.
 
Watching this video and answering the questions above should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to Marlene Johnson, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/individualism-collectivist/individualism-collectivist-tutorial).

3.3.2 Conformity versus Independence   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Paul Hannan’s “Group Conformity Studies” Link: SOPHIA: Paul Hannan’s “Group Conformity Studies” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch this video about group conformity. Take notes and look at the key vocabulary below the video. When you feel like you understand, please take the self-check quiz to the right of the video. How is conformity shown in Anthem? Cite a few examples from the story.
 
Watching this video, taking the self-check quiz, and answering the question above should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to Paul Hannan, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/group-conformity-studies/group-conformity-studies--3-tutorial?from_many_ways=true&diversity=group-conformity-studies--4).

3.3.3 Economic and Political Models   3.3.3.1 Marxism in Theory and Reality   - Explanation: Purdue University's College of Liberal Arts: “Introduction to Marxism” Link: Purdue University’s College of Liberal Arts: “Introduction to Marxism” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on “General Introduction,” and read this information about Marxism. If you would like to spend more time clicking on the other links, that is up to you. I believe the general introduction offers enough background about Marxism. How do you think Ayn Rand felt about Marxism? Why?
 
Reading this material and answering the questions above should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.3.3.2 Democracy in Theory and Reality   - Reading: Demos: Thomas R. Martin’s “Democracy in the Politics of Aristotle” Link: Demos: Thomas R. Martin’s “Democracy in the Politics of Aristotle” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This link will take you to page 7 of 13 of “Democracy in the Politics of Aristotle.” Read pages 7-13, which discuss Aristotle’s ideas on democracy. After reading this, think about the shape America’s democracy is in today. By Aristotle’s standards, do you believe America is still a democracy? Write a paragraph or two about your thoughts on this and give specific examples from the reading to prove your answer. Do you think the dystopian setting in Anthem resulted from a failed democracy? Prove your thoughts on this with some examples from Anthem.
 
Reading this selection and answering the questions above should take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.4 Reading Comprehension and Analysis   This is the part where you get to use all of those annotation skills we learned about earlier. Print a copy of Anthem, grab a highlighter, some sticky notes and a pen, and let’s get ready to read and make some usable notes!

3.4.1 Character Development   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Analyzing Characterization” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Analyzing Characterization” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This link will take you to a tutorial that we used earlier in Unit 2. Just read over the material as a review about characterization. Then, using Equality 7-2521 from Anthem as your character, “stalk” him through Steps 1, 2, and 3 as shown in the tutorial. This will be an informal character analysis, but write a rough draft, citing examples you find from the story.
 
Reviewing this tutorial and writing the character analysis should take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original verison can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/analyzing-characterization/analyzing-characterization-tutorial).

3.4.2 Vocabulary in Context   - Explanation: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Interpreting Vocabulary in Context” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Interpreting Vocabulary in Context” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation, taking notes as necessary, as a review from Unit 2.
 
Reviewing this presentation should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to LaShanda Lawrence, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/interpreting-vocabulary-in-context/interpreting-vocabulary-in-context-tutorial).

3.4.3 Metaphors and Symbolism   - Web Media: The English Faculty Podcast: Simon Swift’s “What is a Symbol? What is a Metaphor?” Link: The English Faculty Podcast: Simon Swift’s “What is a Symbol? What is a Metaphor?” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch this video. Although this podcast discusses symbolism and metaphor in poetry, the instructor does a good job of explaining the difference between the two literary terms and gives concrete examples of each. After listening to the podcast, think about the differences between symbolism and metaphors. Make a list of some symbols and some metaphors found in Anthem. Now, you are going to write an essay explaining the differences between symbols and metaphors, giving examples of how each of these literary devices are used in Anthem. Please remember to give specific examples from the story and explain why each example is a symbol or a metaphor.
 
Watching this podcast and writing the essay should take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/). It is
attributed to Simon Swift, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.theenglishfaculty.org/a-levels/item/253-what-is-a-symbol?-what-is-a-metaphor?-coleridge-wordsworth-keats).

3.4.4 Motifs   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Identifying Motifs” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Identifying Motifs” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch this video about motifs. Can you identify any motifs in Anthem?
 
Watching this video should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/identifying-motifs/identifying-motifs-tutorial).
  • Explanation: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Motif” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Motif” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this presentation and take note of the list of common motifs found in literature. Do you believe there are multiple motifs found in Anthem? What are they? Give specific examples to prove them.
     
    Reading this presentation and answering the questions above should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Assessed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License. It is attributed to LaShanda Lawrence, and the original version can be found here.

  • Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Motifs” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Motifs” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this handout. This is an excellent explanation about what a motif is and what it is not! Pay special attention to the chart that compares motifs, themes, and symbols. Now, about those motifs you identified…look over your list and examples. Are you still confident they are motifs? Could they be symbols? Themes?
     
    Reading this handout and answering the questions above should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Assessed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States License. It is attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original version can be found here.

3.4.5 Story Development   3.4.5.1 Identifying Key Plot Points   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Plot” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Plot” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this tutorial about plot. It discusses what a plot is and what a plot is not. The tutorial also gives excellent examples of stories placed onto plot structure graphs. After you study this tutorial, and take some notes, think about the plot structure of Anthem. Draw a plot structure graph and place the key plot points of Anthem on the graph. Do you think Anthem has a linear, nonlinear, or episodic plot? Explain.
 
Reading this tutorial, completing the plot structure activity, and answering the question above should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/plot/plot-tutorial).

3.4.5.2 Developing Themes   - Activity: BetterLesson: Jennifer B’s “Understanding Theme” Link: BetterLesson: Jennifer B’s “Understanding Theme”
 
Instructions: Complete this activity, in which you will discover the themes in fables. After completing this activity, decide what you believe the prevailing theme in Anthem might be. You may want to look over your notes from the subunit about societal models as you consider possible themes.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Web Media: SOPHIA: Nikki Hansen’s “Analyzing the Author” Link: SOPHIA: Nikki Hansen’s “Analyzing the Author” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read through this material about the importance of analyzing the author. When you get to the slides, read through them. Finally, watch the video at the end of the page. It’s not the greatest video ever made, but the information the presenter is relating is useful. What influences in Ayn Rand’s life do you see in Anthem? List at least five influences and give specific examples from the story.
     
    Reading this material, watching the video, and answering the question above should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Assessed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States License. It is attributed to Nikki Hansen, and the original version can be found here.

3.4.5.3 Foreshadowing   - Explanation: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Foreshadowing” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Foreshadowing” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation about foreshadowing as a review from earlier in this course. Think of any examples of foreshadowing in Anthem. Please list three examples from the story.
 
Reviewing this presentation and listing examples should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to LaShanda Lawrence, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/foreshadowing/foreshadowing-tutorial).

3.5 Importance of Setting   Everything has to happen somewhere, right? And depending on where you are, your actions, experiences, and thoughts probably influence the way you behave. If your sibling accidentally stomps on your foot in church, your reaction will hopefully differ from the same stomp occurring at home. The same is true about the setting in a story. Setting is crucial in the behaviors and ideals of the characters. Think about Anthem. Would the characters act or think the same way if the setting were in a present-day city? How would the tone and mood of Anthem be different if it were in a happy little countryside village? Makes a difference, huh?

3.5.1 City versus Pastoral Setting   - Web Media: YouTube: Dr. Lowe’s “William Wordsworth’s ‘Michael,’ a Pastoral Poem” Link: YouTube: Dr. Lowe’s “William Wordsworth’s ‘Michael,’ a Pastoral Poem” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch this video. Although this video is about a poem called “Michael” by William Wordsworth, this teacher actually goes into the Lake District in England to show what a pastoral setting really is. She also talks about how Wordsworth considered the cities created by the Industrial Revolution to symbolize evil, the opposite of the pastoral setting. What do you believe Rand uses the pastoral setting in Anthem to symbolize? Why do you think so?
 
Watching this video and answering the questions above should take approximately 10 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)     
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Dr. Lowe, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pR33j1IehKI).
  • Explanation: Search Dictionaries.com: “Definition of Pastoral” Link: Search Dictionaries.com: “Definition of Pastoral” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read these definitions for pastoral. For the purpose of this assignment, you need to use the third definition about a literary work that idealizes rural life. With that definition in mind, why do you believe Rand uses a pastoral setting in Anthem rather than a busy city setting? Write a brief paragraph explaining why you believe Rand chose the pastoral setting. Please cite examples that show the pastoral setting in the story.
     
    Reading these definitions and writing the paragraph should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Assessed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License. It is attributed to Search Dictionaries.com, and the original version can be found here.

3.5.2 How Setting Reflects the Author's Attitude(s)   - Explanation: Ayn Rand Institute: “Ayn Rand on the Importance of Philosophy” Link: Ayn Rand Institute: “Ayn Rand on the Importance of Philosophy” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read Rand’s attitudes about the importance of philosophy. How do you think her emphasis of philosophy in everyday life is shown in Anthem’s setting? Based on her beliefs, why do you believe Rand chose to make Anthem’s setting pastoral?
 
Reading this selection and answering the questions above should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)     
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.6 Rand's Message in History   Ayn Rand’s message in history is multifaceted, but the bottom line is that freedom rules! She professed that man should be free from government regulations and from any interference from the government. Rand also believed that economic freedom was essential to the success of any society. She was concerned about the future of the United States if it continued on its path at the time. What do you think about her message? Have any of Rand’s concerns about the future of the United States been correct?

3.6.1 Totalitarian Societies   - Explanation: Boundless: “Dictatorship and Totalitarianism” Link: Boundless: “Dictatorship and Totalitarianism” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this handout about dictatorship and totalitarianism. What is the difference? Please take notes about totalitarianism. Be sure you understand the definition. Sign up for a free membership to this site and then you can print flashcards, create a study guide, and even take a quiz to check your understanding.
 
Reading this handout, taking notes, and answering the question above should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/). It is
attributed to Boundless, and the original version can be found
[here](https://www.boundless.com/sociology/understanding-government/types-of-states/dictatorship-and-totalitarianism/).

3.6.2 Reforms for Freedom and Individualism   - Web Media: Dotsub: Rand’s “Message to GOP Candidates” Link: Dotsub: Rand’s “Message to GOP Candidates” (Adobe Flash)
 
Instructions: Watch this video, in which Ayn Rand speaks to Republican candidates about what reforms she believes must occur for their political party and the United States to succeed. To check your understanding, write a summary of Rand’s speech. Do you agree or disagree with what Rand is saying?
 
Watching this video and writing the summary should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is in the public domain.
  • Web Media: Dotsub: Dr. Leonard Peikoff’s “America Versus Americans” Link: Dotsub: Dr. Leonard Peikoff’s “America versus Americans” (Adobe Flash)
     
    Instructions: Watch this lecture. Dr. Peikoff is speaking about why he believes Americans of today are totally different from Americans of Revolutionary times or even from the World War II era. After you listen to his speech, summarize it in your own words. Do you agree or disagree that Americans today are not the same as those traditionally considered Americans? What do you believe is the biggest difference in the Americans who founded America and the Americans who live here today?
     
    Watching this lecture and writing the summary should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Assessed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.6.3 Researching a Civilization   3.6.3.1 Research an Example of a Totalitarian State   - Activity: BetterLesson: Samantha Western’s “Totalitarianism Case Study” Link: BetterLesson: Samantha Western’s “Totalitarianism Case Study” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Use the Internet for research and complete this pie chart about totalitarianism in Stalin’s Russia. In addition, for each fact you write on the chart, cite the source or link where you found the information.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Samantha Western, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/126862/totalitarianism-case-study).

3.6.3.2 Compare and Contrast with *Anthem*   - Activity: BetterLesson: Matt Hurst’s “Compare Contrast Writing Worksheet” Link: BetterLesson: Matt Hurst’s “Compare Contrast Writing Worksheet” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Print these worksheets if possible. If not, then write the information in your notes. You will use this Venn diagram and the exercises that follow to compare and contrast the characteristics of the totalitarian state you researched with Anthem. Using this worksheet, you will write a rough draft paragraph comparing and contrasting the characteristics to Anthem.
 
Completing these worksheets and writing the paragraph should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Matt Hurst, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/1387283/compare-contrast-writing-worksheet-pdf?from=search).

3.6.3.3 Apply the Novel’s Themes and Message to the Totalitarian State   - Reading: Alexander S. Peak’s “Anthem Afterword” Link: Alexander S. Peak’s “Anthem Afterword” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this afterword to Anthem by Alexander S. Peak. He mentions many of the themes and messages from Anthem. Write a paragraph explaining how these themes and messages are present or not present in the totalitarian state that you researched.
 
Reading this afterword and writing the paragraph should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/). It is
attributed to Alexander S. Peak, and the original version can be
found [here](http://alexpeak.com/twr/anthem/aw.html).

3.7 Literary Response Essay   Do you like to express your opinion? Are you good at backing up your opinions with examples? You probably use these skills often, and now you get to apply them to writing! You will give your opinion about a certain literary characteristic, or characteristics, found in Anthem. Then, you will find specific examples from the story that back up what you are saying about those characteristics.

3.7.1 Responding to a Prompt on Rand’s Message   - Reading: BetterLesson: New Orleans Collegiate Academies: “Literary Analysis Performance Task” Link: BetterLesson: New Orleans Collegiate Academies: “Literary Analysis Performance Task” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Download this 35-page packet, and if possible, please print it. This packet is an invaluable resource for writing a literary analysis, including mini-lessons on various grammar and editing practices. The only change to this document is that you will write a literary analysis of Ayn Rand’s Anthem rather than George Orwell’s 1984.
 
The prompt you are responding to is this: Identify one primary theme from Anthem and explain how Rand communicates this theme.
 
Be sure your thesis statement includes the four elements given on page 5 of the packet. After formulating your thesis statement, you will be able to continue through this packet, writing and refining your literary analysis as you go. You will, of course, use evidence from the text to support your thesis.
 
Working through this packet and responding to the prompt should take approximately 5 hours.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to New Orleans Collegiat Academies, and the original
version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/169038/lit_analysis_writing_performance_task_1984-doc).

3.7.2 Textual Evidence to Support the Thesis   - Activity: BetterLesson: Carolynn Molleur’s “Day 1 Annotation” Link: BetterLesson: Carolynn Molleur’s “Day 1 Annotation” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This graphic organizer will help you organize the textual evidence you use to support your theme. You should complete this graphic organizer; you will probably need more than one copy for all of your evidence. This is a supplemental organizer to be used with the literary analysis packet from the last subunit. Embedding text is covered on pages 19-22 of the literary analysis packet.
 
Working with this graphic organizer should take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to Carolynn Molleur, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/13229/day-1-annotation-asking-specific-questions-an?from=search).

3.7.3 Persuasive Essay to Support or Dispute Rand’s Message   - Explanation: BetterLesson: Julie Inwright’s “Rhetoric and Persuasion” Link: BetterLesson: Julie Inwright’s “Rhetoric and Persuasion” (HTML)
 
Instructions: As a review, read through this presentation about the use of ethos, logos, and pathos in persuasive writing.
 
Reading this presentation should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Julie Inwright, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/1431739/rhetoric-and-persuasion-ppt).
  • Activity: BetterLesson: Johonna McCants and Rachel Venezia’s “Persuasive Writing Tools” Link: BetterLesson: Johonna McCants and Rachel Venezia’s “Persuasive Writing Tools” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Print this packet if possible. It contains many different styles of graphic organizers for persuasive and expository writing. Go to page 5, “My Opinion: A Graphic Organizer.” On this page, you will state whether you support (agree) or dispute (disagree) Ayn Rand’s message in Anthem. Then, you will give three reasons to support your stance.
     
    Next, you will complete the Persuasive Planning Sheet on pages 7 and 8 of this packet. This will help you organize your thoughts and supporting examples. If you agree with Rand, you will not need to complete paragraph 5, as it is a rebuttal paragraph. If you disagree, you will state Rand’s beliefs that you disagree with and rebut each of them.
     
    Finally, after collecting all of your thoughts, examples, and rebuttals, you will use your prewriting to successfully write a persuasive essay.
     
    Working through this packet and writing the persuasive essay should take approximately 3 hours.
     
    Standards Assessed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. It is attributed to Johonna McCants and Rachel Venezia, and the original version can be found here.

Extension Resources   - Reading: Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury Like Anthem, this novel has a dystopian setting. Firemen start fires rather than putting them out; there’s a love interest on more than one level; and ultimately, everyone ends up in the woods to “start over.”

  • Reading: Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka Metamorphosis is a strange story with several interesting themes. Not only will you want to skip the snooze on your alarm clock, you will also think twice before squashing a cockroach.