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K12ELA010: English Language Arts 10

Unit 2: Short Stories   Before delving into longer, more rigorous texts, it wil be helpful for you to digest a series of shorter stories. This will allow you to practice reading skills, literary analysis, and response writing on a variety of texts with different themes, styles, and techniques.
 
For each story, you will learn the literary devices used therein. You will assess the author’s tone, style, theme(s), and message. The stories will be used to practice close reading practices, such as annotating, questioning, and drawing inferences. Additionally, you will be exposed to a range of influential writers, genres, and time periods. Overall, the stories will serve as an introduction to literary traditions as well as a vehicle for textual interpretation and response.
 
Although these stories can stand on their own (thus serving as the subunit titles), you will be expected to compare and contrast their content and style. You will draw thematic connections across the literature and use these connections to ultimately write a formal literary response paper. At the end of this unit, you will have the terminology, reading practices, and critical eye needed for a close, meaningful examination of texts/literature.

Unit 2 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take you approximately 56 hours:
 
☐    Subunit 2.1: 10 hours
 
☐    Subunit 2.2: 6 hours
 
☐    Subunit 2.3: 6 hours
 
☐    Subunit 2.4: 11 hours
 
☐    Subunit 2.5: 4 hours
 
☐    Subunit 2.6: 3 hours
 
☐    Subunit 2.7: 16 hours

Unit2 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to: - identify and evaluate the key elements, terminology, and traditions of literature; - analyze an author’s message, intent, and writing style, and respond critically to it using textual support; and - compare and contrast the views and methodology of two writers/speakers, analyzing how these similarities and differences affect the message.

Standards Addressed (Common Core): - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9

2.1 “2BR02B” by Kurt Vonnegut   “2BR02B,” pronounced “To Be or Naught to Be,” with naught being another name for the number zero, is a science fiction short story by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. The story takes place in the future in a society where population control is not a problem. I won’t ruin the story for you by giving away the plot, but pay special attention to exactly what must happen for this ideal population control to take place. Think about the theme of utopia (a perfect world) and the dystopia (chaos) that often occurs. How closely related are utopia and dystopia? Are they worlds apart, or is there only a fine line separating the two? Enjoy the story!

2.1.1 Establishing Setting   - Web Media: Curriki: Tom Jones’s “Elements of Fiction” Link: Curriki: Tom Jones’s “Elements of Fiction” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link, log in, download the file, and watch this presentation about the elements of fiction. Pay special attention to the first three slides about setting, but go ahead and review all of the elements. Then, jot down what you believe the setting is in “2BR02B.” As you make your notes about what you believe the setting to be, write down some specific examples, or quotations, that gave you the ideas about the setting. In other words, write down the part or sentence(s) from the story that helped you determine the setting. How did you know that was the setting? Prove it by showing those examples.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.2 Imagery   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Imagery” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Imagery” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read and/or listen to this tutorial about imagery. Take notes as you read, and then, give three examples of figurative imagery from “2BR02B,” explaining why each contains figurative imagery.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage.

2.1.3 Metaphor/Symbolism   - Explanation: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Symbolism” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Symbolism” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read through this PowerPoint presentation about symbolism, and take notes. Then, find at least four different examples of symbolism from “2BR0RB.”
 
Reading about symbolism, taking notes, and finding examples should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use on the
webpage listed above.
  • Explanation: SOPHIA: David Shaffer’s “Metaphors and Similes” Link: SOPHIA: David Shaffer’s “Metaphors and Similes” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read through this tutorial. There are some videos to watch as well, and be sure to take notes. Now, try to find two examples of metaphor in “2BR02B.”
     
    Reading this tutorial, watching the videos, taking notes, and finding examples should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: YouTube: LoveYourPencil: “Symbolism” Link: YouTube: LoveYourPencil: “Symbolism” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Watch this video about symbolism. While watching, find three examples of symbolism in “2BR02B.” Be sure to explain why the examples you chose are symbolic. Keep these for later!
     
    Watching this video and finding examples should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Activity: BetterLesson: New Orleans Collegiate Academies: “Guided Notes Symbolism” Link: BetterLesson: New Orleans Collegiate Academies: “Guided Notes Symbolism” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Begin by reading the short story in Section II on the first page. This section will ask you to explain what you think the symbols might stand for. Then, the “Homework” page asks you to think of five symbols that you see in everyday life and explain them. This activity will help you to “be on the lookout” for symbolism in your reading.
     
    Reading this short story and working through the “Homework” page should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.4 Utopia versus Dystopia   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Dystopia: The Ultimate Dysfunctional Society” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Dystopia: The Ultimate Dysfunctional Society” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read through this PowerPoint presentation, and take notes about the characteristics of a dystopian society. Then, give at least three examples showing how the setting of “2BR02B” is dystopian.
 
Taking notes and giving examples should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United
States](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Kathryn Reilly, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/dystopia/dystopia-tutorial).

2.2 “The Country of the Blind” by H. G. Wells   This short story is a real eye-opener (ha, ha, ha—I crack myself up)! Really though, this guy finds himself in an isolated area where being blind has become “normal.” At first, he thinks, “Oh yeah, I’m the man in this land! I can see everything, and they can see nothing!” But shortly, he finds that that is not the case at all. His sight becomes a disability for him, and ultimately he must choose whether his sight or his love for a blind woman is most important. This story will really make you think about what it means to be an alien in another country, uncertain of the customs and traditions that you may believe to be “normal.” It also brings thoughts of what a disability really is and how that disability may be defined by circumstances surrounding it.

2.2.1 Compare/Contrast with “2BR02B”   - Web Media: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Compare and Contrast” Link: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Compare and Contrast” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch this video, which discusses three different ways to organize a compare/contrast assignment. Please take notes, and decide which method you think you will be most comfortable using.
 
Watching this video and taking notes should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/). It is
attributed to The Writing Center, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/compare-and-contrast/).

2.2.2 Societal Norms/Culture/Traditions   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Sadie Pendaz’s “Culture, Norms, & Deviance” Link: SOPHIA: Sadie Pendaz’s “Culture, Norms, & Deviance” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch this tutorial about norms and deviance. Make a list of any deviance from the norm that you read about in “The Country of the Blind.” Give specific examples of this deviance and explain why, in their isolated society, this deviance actually was the norm. Can you think of any “norms” you have in your society? Why would people from another place find your “norms” strange? Have you ever been anywhere and felt like their “norms” were different than yours? Who decides what is “normal”? Think about it. Be sure to take the interactive quiz on the right side of the page to check your understanding.
 
Watching this tutorial, listing examples of deviance and norms, and ansering the questions above should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)     
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to Sadie Pendaz, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/norms/norms-tutorial?pathway=culture-norms-deviance).

2.2.3 Characterization   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Characterization” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Characterization” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this PowerPoint presentation about characterization. Be sure to remember the five ways that authors might show, rather than tell, characterization. Now, think about Nunez, and list some of the ways he is characterized in the story. Be sure to give specific examples that show you information about his character.
 
Reading this presentation should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)     
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)     
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/). It
is attributed to Kathryn Reilly, and the original verison can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/characterization/characterization-tutorial).

2.2.4 Foreshadowing   - Web Media: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Foreshadowing” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Foreshadowing” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this PowerPoint presentation about foreshadowing in literature. What type of foreshadowing do you find in “The Country of the Blind”? Please give specific examples of foreshadowing from the story, explaining why it is foreshadowing and what kind.
 
Reading this presentation and answering the questions above should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to LaShanda Lawrence, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/foreshadowing/foreshadowing-tutorial).

2.2.5 Tone/Mood   - Web Media: YouTube: Kevin Brookhouser’s “What Is the Difference between Tone and Mood?” Link: YouTube: Kevin Brookhouser’s “What Is the Difference between Tone and Mood?” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch this video about tone and mood. What is the tone in “The Country of the Blind”? The mood? What is the difference between tone and mood?
 
Watching this video and answering the questions above should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)     
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.3 “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” by Ambrose Bierce   If you thought “The Country of the Blind” was an eye-opener, then “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” will really keep you hanging! Oh my! You will have to read the story to understand what I mean by “hanging”! Basically, this short story is about a man’s last thoughts before dying. There are many hints about what is actually going on—foreshadowing, if you will, and then a surprise ending that I will not ruin for you. Rest assured, the imagery and foreshadowing alone will keep you engaged in this one.

2.3.1 Foreshadowing/Imagery Review   - Reading: BetterLesson: Kevin Kloth’s “Foreshadowing Notes” Link: BetterLesson: Kevin Kloth’s “Foreshadowing Notes” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read through this PowerPoint presentation about foreshadowing, and take notes. There are many examples given from fairy tales and some practice lessons for you to complete on the last two slides. When you have completed the practice lessons, please list two or three instances of foreshadowing from “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge.”
 
Reading through the presentation and answering the question above should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Kevin Kloth, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/99300/foreshadowing-notes?from=search).

2.3.2 Drawing Inferences   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Inferences” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Inferences” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch this video about inferences. Please take notes and pay close attention to the many examples that the presenter gives. What inference or inferences can you make from “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge?” Can you support these inferences with strong evidence from the story?
 
Watching this video, taking notes, and answering the questions above should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)     
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original verison can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/inferences/inferences-tutorial).

2.3.3 Annotating   What in the world is annotating? It’s really just a fancy name for taking notes as you read. That may mean highlighting things you want to remember or making notes to yourself about a certain passage that you may want to come back to. Annotation is a really handy thing to know how to do, especially if you are going to write a literary analysis.

2.3.3.1 How to Annotate During Reading   - Reading: BetterLesson: Colleen Lawson-Thornton’s “Quote-Note-Thought Notes” Link: BetterLesson: Colleen Lawson-Thornton’s “Quote-Note-Thought Notes” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read these directions for taking Quote-Note-Thought notes. Then, read the selection and use your new QNT skills in the chart provided.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Colleen Lawson-Thornton, and the original version can
be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/832134/quote-note-thought-notes-doc).

2.3.3.2 How to Reflect After Reading   - Explanation: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Reflecting on Reading” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Reflecting on Reading” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this PowerPoint presentation. Take notes and be prepared to reflect on your reading.
 
Reading this presentation and taking notes should take approximately 10 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to LaShanda Lawrence, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/reflecting-on-reading/reflecting-on-reading-tutorial).

2.4 “The Pit and the Pendulum” by Edgar Allan Poe   Moving along in our short story unit, this tale takes another look at impending doom. Unlike the main character in “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge,” the main character in “The Pit and the Pendulum” is not only facing death, but a torturous one. This story examines the horror and fear brought on by various tortures of the Spanish Inquisition. Turn down the lights, make some popcorn, and enjoy this creepy story.

  • Reading: The Literature Network: Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Pit and the Pendulum” Link: The Literature Network: Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Pit and the Pendulum” (text) and LibriVox: Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Pit and the Pendulum” (audio)
     
    Instructions: Click on the first link if you would like to read this short story. If you prefer to listen to the short story, click on the second link. After clicking the second link, you will need to scroll down to the last story and click on the Mp3 link. Later in this subunit, you will need to cite quotations from the short story, so even if you choose to listen, you should read along, making annotations on a printed copy of the story if possible.
     
    Reading and/or listening to this short story should take approximately 45 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Explanation: BetterLesson: AF High School Literature: “Dark Romanticism” Link: BetterLesson: AF High School Literature: “Dark Romanticism” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Click the download button on the right side of this page to read the presentation. Be sure to read the comments at the bottom of each slide. Please disregard the last slide as it refers to a poem we are not analyzing. Notes about dark romanticism will be used to refer back to at a later time, so please be sure to take good notes. Also, think about some examples of dark romanticism in “The Pit and the Pendulum.” If you were able to print the story, read through and highlight or underline any examples you find, annotating in the margin why they are good examples.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. It is attributed to AF High School Literature, and the original version can be found here.

2.4.1 Imagery/Mood/Tone/Symbolism Review   - Explanation: Wikispaces: sbrooksdriftwood’s “Tone and Mood” Link: Wikispaces: sbrooksdriftwood’s “Tone and Mood” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link titled “Tone and Mood.ppt” and open the file. Read through this PowerPoint presentation, taking notes about tone and mood.  Be sure to answer the questions on the slides that ask you to read a passage and think about its tone or mood.  When you have completed the slideshow and activities, write a letter to one of your friends explaining what tone is, what mood is, and how they are different.
 
Reading the presentation, taking notes, and writing the letter should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution Share-Alike 3.0
License](http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0). It is
attributed to sbrooksdriftwood, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://sbrooksdriftwood.wikispaces.com/file/detail/Tone+and+Mood.ppt/165851043).

2.4.2 Narrative Voice   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Author’s Voice” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Author’s Voice” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this handout about author’s voice and point of view. As you read, be sure to pay attention to the information about the author’s voice and the narrator’s point of view not always being the same. Do you think the narrator in “The Pit and the Pendulum”is speaking with Poe’s voice or in a different point of view? What makes you think this? Find some examples to prove it!
 
Reading this handout and answering the questions above should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/the-authors-voice/the-authors-voice-tutorial).

2.4.2.1 Reliability of Narrator   - Web Media: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Evaluating Narrator Reliability” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Evaluating Narrator Reliability” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Pay close attention to what you are reading in this presentation. Had you ever thought about NOT trusting a narrator before? Based on the all the things a narrator should be, do you believe the narrator of “The Pit and the Pendulum” is reliable? Why do you believe what you believe? Can you give specific examples of times the narrator is reliable? Not reliable? Why do you think this is the case?
 
Reading this presentation and answering the questions above should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to LaShanda Lawrence, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/evaluating-narrator-reliability/evaluating-narrator-reliability-tutorial).

2.4.2.2 Narrator as a Character   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Analyze the Impact of the Point of View” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Analyze the Impact of the Point of View” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation. If “The Pit and the Pendulum” had been told from a different point of view, what might change about the story? Would you know more or less about what is happening? How might you feel differently about the narrator? Point of view is a pretty important point, huh?
 
Reading this presentation and answering the questions above should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/analyze-the-impact-of-the-point-of-view/analyze-the-impact-of-the-point-of-view-tutorial).

2.4.3 Psychological Fiction   2.4.3.1 Characterization as a Gateway to the Human Psyche   - Activity: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Analyzing Characterization” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Analyzing Characterization” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Now, get ready to have some fun! This little informative sheet is going to guide you through an analysis of a character. It asks you to choose a character from the story, and well, you don’t really have a huge choice—it’s going to need to be the narrator. But that means the first step is already done for you! So, with the narrator of “The Pit and the Pendulum” as your subject, proceed question by question through this exercise. Work your way through the questions in Step 2 and Step 3. If you would like to look at the example first, it may help you in “stalking” your character. And they couldn’t have chosen a better example for you—another Poe story! Also, if you have been annotating as you read, a lot of the answers to the questions will be obvious.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/analyzing-characterization/analyzing-characterization-tutorial).

2.4.3.2 How Characterization Affects Tone/Mood   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Describing the Mood” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Describing the Mood” (HTML)
 
Instructions: As you read this handout about mood, think about “The Pit and the Pendulum.” How would you describe the mood in the story? Do you think the mood enhances or detracts from the story? Can you give some specific examples from the story that helped you determine the mood?
 
Reading this handout and answering the questions above should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original version an be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/describing-the-mood/describing-the-mood-tutorial).

2.5 Dracula’s Guest by Bram Stoker   Just when you thought it was over…another short story from the Dark Romantic genre. This short story was published after Stoker’s death. Some say it is from the original manuscript of Dracula. Regardless of its origin, it is a story worth reading and studying. Be sure to make annotations as you read the story, highlighting examples that help you to understand why the author wrote the story (theme) and how his characters’ actions and words carry out the theme. Enjoy the story!

2.5.1 Compare/Contrast with “The Pit and the Pendulum” within Dark Romanticism Genre   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Tara Neely’s “Gothic Literature Introduction” Link: SOPHIA: Tara Neely’s “Gothic Literature Introduction” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this great presentation about Dark Romanticism/Gothic elements in Poe’s work. After reading through the slides, see if you can identify any of these elements in Stoker’s “Dracula’s Guest.” Be sure to cite specific examples of these elements as you find them. Then, I bet you can guess what is next…you get to compare and contrast “The Pit and the Pendulum” and “Dracula’s Guest.”
 
Think about both stories in a dark romantic way, then choose certain elements to compare and contrast. For example, you may choose to compare and contrast the settings, imagery, tones, symbolism, and so forth. Be sure to show specific examples to prove the things you are saying.
 
Reading this presentation and completing the compare/contrast exercise should take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/). It is
attributed to Tara Neely, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/lesson-one-gothic-literature-introduction-tutorial).

2.5.2 Defining New Words within Context   - Explanation: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Determining Meaning through Context” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “Determining Meaning through Context” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation. You may want to take some notes because this is pretty handy stuff. Now, skim through your printed copy of “Dracula’s Guest” and jot down 5 to 10 words that you don’t really know. Here are some words from the story to get you started: obstinate, manifest, paroxysm, restive, commencement. There’s no extra charge for those, and I bet you can find at least five more to practice your skills.
 
Reading this presentation and completing the vocabulary exercise should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)     
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to LaShanda Lawrence, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/interpreting-vocabulary-in-context/interpreting-vocabulary-in-context-tutorial).

2.6 Comparing Literary Traditions   Okay, so we know what comparing is, but what is a literary tradition? A literary tradition is simply a group or collection of literature that, for a long, long time, has included the same themes or ideas or styles of writing. So, for example, the first two short stories we read, “2BR02B” and “The Country of the Blind,” both had settings that were utopian in different ways. In that way, those stories are from the same literary tradition. So, think about the other stories you have read in this unit, decide what themes they have that are similar, and then you will get to compare the different literary traditions.

2.6.1 Identifying Themes   2.6.1.1 What is a Theme?   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Identifying the Theme” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Identifying the Theme” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch this video about identifying theme. When you are finished, watch it one more time, this time thinking about the information in light of “Dracula’s Guest.” Then, write down what you think the theme is in “Dracula’s Guest.” Is there more than one? Can you show examples from the story that prove what you think the theme is?
 
Watching this video and identifying the themes in “Dracula’s Guest” should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Sydney Bauer, and the original verison can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/identifying-the-theme/identifying-the-theme-tutorial).

2.6.1.2 Comparing Themes among the Stories   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Common Themes” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Common Themes” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation, and take notes about the different common themes found in literature. Do any of these themes apply to “Dracula’s Guest”? How do you know? Can you apply any of these themes to the other stories we have read in this unit? Please list each story we have read and what you believe to be the theme of each story. Also, list anything you may have independently read that applies to the other common themes mentioned in the slides.
 
Reading the slides, taking notes, and listing stories and themes should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/). It
is attributed to Kathryn Reilly, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/common-themes/common-themes-tutorial).

2.6.2 Authorial Intent   2.6.2.1 Revisiting Each Author's Purpose   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Nichole Carter’s “Theme and Author’s Purpose” Link: SOPHIA: Nichole Carter’s “Theme and Author’s Purpose” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch this video according to the instructions, and complete the self-check quiz. How does this information help you understand the author’s purpose in “Dracula’s Guest”? Did it help to clarify any questions about what the theme is?
 
Watching this video, completing the quiz, and answering the questions above should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to Nichole Carter, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/theme-and-authors-purpose-historical-fiction-conce-tutorial).

2.6.2.2 Comparing the Authors’ Intentions/Messages   - Activity: BetterLesson: Amber Smith’s “Venn Diagram Template” Link: BetterLesson: Amber Smith’s “Venn Diagram Template” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Either print a copy of this Venn diagram or draw your own. Begin listing the authors’ intentions/messages (themes) from two of the stories you have read in this unit. Be sure to place the like items in the overlapping portion of the circles.
 
Filling in your Venn diagram should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Amber Smith, and the original version can be found
[here](http://betterlesson.com/document/105655/venn-diagram-template).

2.7 In-Depth Literary Response   Now it’s time to put all of the skills you have acquired into action! You get to choose two of the short stories we have read and compare and contrast them. In this writing, you will look at the literary elements used in each story and decide which ones are similar and which ones are not similar. To prove this in your writing, you are going to have to show, or cite, specific examples. Then you will explain how these specific examples show the literary devices that are similar and not similar. It sounds like a lot, but really it’s just like eating an elephant! And the only way to eat an elephant is one…bite…at…a…time. Let’s get started!

2.7.1 Choosing Two Stories to Compare/Contrast for Literary Response   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Ryan Howard’s “Comparing and Contrasting Literary Texts” Link: SOPHIA: Ryan Howard’s “Comparing and Contrasting Literary Texts” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation. You really need to take notes on this one. These slides will guide you through a comparison and contrast of two fairy tales. This activity begins on slide 5 and will be great practice, so please read the fairy tales and follow through with the assignment on the remaining slides. Take notes, take notes, take notes!
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Ryan Howard, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/comparing-and-contrasting-texts-tutorial).

2.7.1.1 Responding to an Essay Prompt   - Activity: BetterLesson: Jennifer B’s “How Do We Analyze Stories by Comparing and Contrasting Them?” Link: BetterLesson: Jennifer B’s “How Do We Analyze Stories by Comparing and Contrasting Them?” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This is another great practice activity to make sure you are able to adequately compare and contrast two stories. The Venn diagrams used here should look very familiar to you, and practicing with the short passages will be helpful for the next part of our unit. As an added bonus, the last page of this activity allows you to use your skills at finding like themes, and that will also be helpful.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.7.1.2 Using Details from Both Texts   - Explanation: Curriki: Andrea Chen’s “Literary Analysis Essay Guide” Link: Curriki: Andrea Chen’s “Literary Analysis Essay Guide” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Be sure you are logged in on Curriki, and then download this essay guide. Really, if at all possible, please print a copy of this guide as a reference for the next subunit. It really nails the “how-to” aspect of writing a literary analysis. If you cannot get to a printer, then you really need to take super great notes from this guide. At any rate, please do read over this guide and be prepared to refer back to it soon!
 
Reading this handout should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Andrea Chen, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.curriki.org/xwiki/bin/view/Coll_AndreaNOLA/How-toGuidetoWritingLiteraryAnalysisEssays).

2.7.1.3 Rhetorical Devices Used in Literary Analysis   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “The Impact of Rhetorical Devices” Link:SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “The Impact of Rhetorical Devices” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This is one more tutorial about rhetorical devices. It gives examples and explains the impact that each may have in writing. Please take notes about the different rhetorical devices. Then, list each of the eight rhetorical devices given in this presentation with an original example of each device. It may be challenging to come up with a few of the examples, but do your best. Writing your original examples will help you to better understand the devices and make you more aware of their usage.
 
Reading this presentation and completing the rhetorical devices activity should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/). It
is attributed to Kathryn Reilly, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/the-impact-of-rhetorical-devices/the-impact-of-rhetorical-devices-tutorial).

2.7.1.4 Citing Details Correctly   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Melissa Stephenson’s “In-Text Citations” Link:SOPHIA: Melissa Stephenson’s “In-Text Citations” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link. Oh my goodness that’s a lot of words! This is a rather lengthy explanation about what citation is and why we use it. It also explains two or three different formats for using citation. Look this over, know it exists, and remember that someday you will need to use it. Fortunately, that day is not today! In your literary analysis, you will only need to cite those examples that you take from the story. Since you will not be using outside sources, you can simply follow the examples from the wonderful information given below in subunit 2.7.2.
 
Unless you really enjoy reading about citations, reviewing this material should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/). It is
attributed to Melissa Stephenson, and the original version can be
found [here](http://www.sophia.org/in-text-citations--3-tutorial).

2.7.2 Writing a Formal Essay for Literary Analysis   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Kathy Hanley’s “Selecting Topics for Literary Analysis” Link:SOPHIA: Kathy Hanley’s “Selecting Topics for Literary Analysis” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link and explore. There is SO much useful information here, and I want you to savor every morsel!
 
To begin, watch the video. Now, get some paper and a pen and write your own “literary analysis claim,” A.K.A., thesis statement, about one of the short stories you have read in this unit. Okay, now write another statement for another one of the stories we have read. Set these aside, but keep them close.
 
Now on to the slides. Read through them, thinking about the two short stories you have chosen from this unit. When you get to Slide 6, pick one of these two stories and answer the questions about it. Then, answer those same questions about the other story you chose. Again, set these aside, but keep them handy.
 
The next set of slides contains step-by-step instructions to write a literary analysis. This material takes the information from the guide in Subunit 2.7.1 and adds a lot more detail about what to include in your introduction, body, and conclusion. It even talks about how to title your paper! This is some good stuff that you will probably come back to time and time again.
 
Finally, there are some excellent links that will provide you with more helpful hints for writing literary analyses. These are all great tips and you should read over them too.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 3 hours.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). It is
attributed to Kathy Hanley, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.sophia.org/selecting-topics-for-literary-analysis--2-tutorial).
  • Explanation: SOPHIA: Laura Knifflin’s “Comparison and Contrast Essays” Link: SOPHIA: Laura Knifflin’s “Comparison and Contrast Essays” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: First, draw a Venn diagram to brainstorm the elements you listed about each of the short stories you chose. Hopefully, you chose two stories that have some common elements, and you will see those in the overlapping section of the circles. Those are the comparisons you will discuss in your essay. The elements outside of that common area are the contrasts, or differences, you will discuss.
     
    Is this starting to make a little more sense now?
     
    Next, notice the two different ways given to set up your comparison and contrast essay. Decide which way you feel most comfortable using.
     
    Slide 10 gives an excellent list of word choices to use as transitions in writing a comparison and contra and contrast essays.
     
    So now it’s your turn…take all of this wonderful guidance and information, and write a literary analysis comparing and contrasting the two stories you chose earlier. You may want to go back and look in the first unit to refresh your memory about essay structure, proofreading, and so forth.
     
    When you think you are finished with your analysis paper, put it down on the table and go for a walk, or go get some ice cream, but get away from that paper. When you get back, or even the next day, go back to your paper and proofread it for errors. More importantly, make sure it says exactly what you want it to say. Make sure you have used examples from the stories to back up what you have said. When you are satisfied with your work, and I know that only your best is satisfying, then write your final draft. Then, show everyone the beautiful work you have completed. Congratulations!
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 6 hours.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

Extension Resources   There are so many great short stories in literature. Here are a few that should inspire you to continue reading in the short-story genre.

  • Reading: The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway This is a short novel about an old man struggling against a really big fish and himself!

  • Reading: “Hills Like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway This story may seem like a simple conversation, but it’s full of symbolism. You have to read between the lines to find the true story.

  • Reading: “Bartleby, the Scrivener” by Herman Melville This is another simple story line with a lot of symbolism. You should enjoy reading this, or maybe, like Bartleby, you “would prefer not to.”

  • Reading: “Rappaccini’s Daughter” by Nathaniel Hawthorne This is a romantic little story full of allusions. A scientist, some poison, and young love are involved, so this story is actually comparable to an episode of CSI.

  • Reading: “Ligeia” by Edgar Allen Poe Like Poe’s other short stories, this one should be read by candlelight on a stormy night. In this early Poe short story, characters include both a dead maiden and a dying maiden. The narrator is, of course, in love with at least one of them, and the story that follows is chilling.