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K12ELA010: English Language Arts 10

Unit 1: Writing Skills   One of the biggest discrepancies among students is writing ability, especially with regard to grammar and writing mechanics in general. Before addressing the major texts or assignments of the course, it is important to address common writing mistakes at the high school level. These include errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, and language usage. Additionally, you will benefit from a step-by-step guide through the writing process and essay structure.
 
For writing mechanics, you will read the rules and view examples of proper writing habits. You will then use these models as a method of identifying proper versus improper usage and editing given examples. Finally, you will create your own writing samples, ultimately exhibiting each of these rules throughout the writing process.
 
Having completed these tasks, you should be ready to tackle the course’s content with a stronger writing voice and greater ability to formulate your responses.

Unit 1 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take approximately 21 hours:
 
☐    Subunit 1.1: 3 hours
 
☐    Subunit 1.2: 4 hours
 
☐    Subunit 1.3: 2 hours
 
☐    Subunit 1.4: 2 hours
 
☐    Subunit 1.5: 3 hours
 
☐    Subunit 1.6: 4 hours
 
☐    Subunit 1.7: 3 hours

Unit1 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to: - define and implement proper writing practices to develop clear/cogent ideas, detailed/relevant explanations, and structured/effective arguments; - identify given errors in sentence structure, diction, punctuation, and spelling, and correct them according to proper English mechanics;and - use the “writing process” to develop and structure an academic essay. 

Standards Addressed (Common Core): - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5

1.1 Writing Voice   In writing, voice is the style the author uses. But, as I’m sure you know, style is a combination of so many things! Just as a stylish outfit may be a combination of a dress, some jewelry, and of course just the right shoes, a writer’s voice is a combination of the words he chooses, the tone he takes, and the unique way the writer’s personality is shown through his writing. Each writer wears the outfit just a bit differently and chooses which accessories to wear – and how to wear them! If you see a poem written in all lower-case letters, you may know immediately that the writer is e. e. cummings, and if you read a paragraph from a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, you would probably suspect he is the author just by the way he writes. I bet certain musical artists have a sound that you can almost always pick out as being “their” sound. This subunit will further explore the writing voice and hopefully help you to understand it better.

  • Explanation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Audience” Link: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s “Audience” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this handout about audience. Although the title is “Audience,” the handout contains a good summary about the meaning of voice and tone in writing. Take notes as you read, and pay special attention to the section about word choice and tone matching the expectations of your audience.
     
    Reading this handout and taking notes should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 License. It is attributed to The Writing Center, and the original version can be found here.

1.1.1 The Importance of Tone/Voice   - Explanation: CK-12: “Commonsense Composition: Tone and Style” Link: CK-12: “Commonsense Composition: Tone and Style” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this handout and answer the first set of review questions, stopping at “Word Choice.” Both tone and style have their own meanings, even though there is a fine line between the two. If you were asked what is the difference between tone and style, what would your answer be?
 
Reading this handout, taking notes, and thoroughly answering the questions should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommerical-ShareAlike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/). It is
attributed to CK-12, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.ck12.org/book/Commonsense-Composition/section/7.1/).

1.1.2 Avoiding Casual Language   - Explanation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's The Writing Center: “Word Choice” Link: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's: “Word Choice” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this handout about word choice, and take notes as you read. There is a lot of good stuff in here about not only avoiding casual language but also about other things to avoid when you write. This handout lists several useful strategies for choosing the words and phrases as you write.
 
Reading this handout and taking notes should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/3/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/). It is
attributed to The Writing Center, and the original version can be
found [here](http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/word-choice/).

1.2 Sentence Structure   This subunit discusses the various ways that sentences can be put together. You really have to vary your sentence structure, or your writing can become boring. The following lessons and activities will help you understand the basic structures of sentences and how to avoid run-ons and fragments.

  • Web Media: BetterLesson: Meredith Newlin’s “Simple, Compound, and Complex Sentences” Link: BetterLesson: Meredith Newlin’s “Simple, Compound, and Complex Sentences” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Download and read this PowerPoint presentation to review different sentence structures. Also, take some time to complete the self-test at the end of the presentation to make sure you understand the differences in sentence structure.
     
    Reading the PowerPoint presentation and completing the self-test should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: BetterLesson: Meredith Newlin’s “Bike Sentence Structure” Link: BetterLesson: Meredith Newlin’s “Bike Sentence Structure” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this PowerPoint presentation, and take notes. This is a super cool visual presentation that analogizes the parts of a sentence with the parts of a bicycle. I recommend actually drawing the bike and taking notes on or around the drawing.
     
    Viewing this presentation and taking notes should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

     Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.1 Avoiding Comma Splices   - Web Media: BetterLesson: Julie Inwright’s “Grammar from YUNiversity” Link: BetterLesson: Julie Inwright’s “Grammar from YUNiversity” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this PowerPoint presentation, which provides a review of comma splices and run-on sentences. There are several self-check exercises to complete, and the added lesson on use of the semicolon is provided free of charge.
 
Reading this PowerPoint presentation and completing the self-check exercises should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/3/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.2 Fixing Run-On Sentences   - Interactive Lab: Capital Community College Foundation: “Run-On Sentences, Comma Splices” Link: Capital Community College Foundation: “Run-On Sentences, Comma Splices” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this PowerPoint presentation and the rest of the webpage, clicking on the interactive links as you go. This is a really cool interactive site, and you get to choose what you need to review. At the end of the page, please take the four quizzes. The site will correct them for you when you are finished. Have fun and learn a lot from this great site!
 
Depending on how much fun you decide to have, this interactive lab should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/3/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.3 Appropriate Sentence Complexity   - Explanation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Sentence Patterns” Link: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Sentence Patterns” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this handout. At the end of the handout, there is a super suggestion about color-coding your sentence structures in your writing. Please take detailed notes on this section as they will help you to vary your sentences as you write.
 
Reading this handout and taking notes should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/3/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/). It is
attributed to The Writing Center, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/sentence-patterns/).
  • Activity: BetterLesson: AF High School: “Varied Sentence Structure Activity” Link: BetterLesson: AF High School: “Varied Sentence Structure Activity” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this handout for various examples of sentence structures. On the last page of the packet, there is an excerpt from Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography and a short answer question. Complete that question, paying special attention to the sentence variety Franklin uses.
     
    Reading this handout and answering the question should take about 20 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.3 Punctuation   Punctuation marks are important writing tools. They determine where you pause, how long you pause, and where you absolutely stop! To be such little marks, they serve a huge function, and learning when, where, and how to use them is crucial to your writing.

1.3.1 Comma Usage   - Explanation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Commas” Link: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Commas” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this handout about commas. Take notes as you read, and be sure to remember the acronym about FANBOYS!
 
Reading this handout and taking notes should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/3/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/). It is
attributed to The Writing Center, and the original version can be
found [here](http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/commas/).
  • Checkpoint: GrammarBook.com: “Commas Quiz” Link: GrammarBook.com: “Commas Quiz” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Take this short quiz on commas. At the end of the quiz, please click on the “Grade Quiz” button and see how you did. Should you miss one of the questions, there is an explanation with each of the answers. Read the explanation of any questions you missed and be sure you understand why you missed them.
     
    Completing this quiz should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.3.2 Semicolon Usage   - Web Media: YouTube: Mathew Rickey’s “Semicolon” Link: YouTube: Mathew Rickey’s “Semicolon” (YouTube)
 
Instructions:  Watch this video, which provides instructions and examples of all the ways to use a semicolon. Please take notes about all of the different ways to use a semicolon, and show an example of each. Then, write three original sentences, correctly using semicolons in each.
 
Watching this video, taking notes, and writing the sentences should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.3.3 Colon Usage   - Explanation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Semi-Colons, Colons, and Dashes” Link: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Semi-Colons, Colons, and Dashes” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read the second section of this handout, which is labeled “Colons,” and take notes as you read. Note common colon mistakes and how to check for them.
 
Reading this handout and taking notes should take approximately 10 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/3/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/). It is
attributed to The Writing Center, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/semi-colons-colons-and-dashes/).

1.4 Homophones   Homophones are words that are pronounced the same, but don’t have the same meaning, and often are not spelled the same. These notes and activities will give you some basic guidelines to follow for homophones.

1.4.1 Commonly Confused/Misspelled Words   - Web Media: BetterLesson: Katherine Podkalicki’s “Homophones Power Point” and “Homophones Lesson” Link: BetterLesson: Katherine Podkalicki’s “Homophones Power Point” (HTML) and “Homophones Lesson” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the first link, “Homophones Power Point,” and view the presentation. Then, click on the second link, “Homophones Lesson,” and if possible, print the guided note-taking sheet. If printing is not available, you may want to write down the notes with blanks from this sheet. Finally, using the handout as a guide, watch the “Homophones Power Point” presentation once more, filling in all of the blanks on the handout.
 
Viewing this PowerPoint presentation and completing the handout should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/3/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.4.2 Choosing the Appropriate Word   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Rebecca Oberg’s “Grammar Basics: Homonyms” Link: SOPHIA: Rebecca Oberg’s “Grammar Basics: Homonyms” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this presentation about misused homonyms. Write these words down and keep them handy, so you won’t be guilty of misusing them! There are two short videos to watch, but they are not required since one is just a funny song about homonyms and the other is a game. After the two videos, please read the “Spelling Tricks: Homonyms” section and write down some of the neat tricks explaining how to remember which spelling to use.
 
Reading this presentation and taking notes should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Assessed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/3/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Did I Get This? Activity: BetterLesson: Stephanie Finger’s “Homophone Assessment” Link: BetterLesson: Stephanie Finger’s “Homophone Assessment” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Complete this “Homophone Assessment.” After you have finished, walk away from it for a bit, and then check over your answers and see if you catch any mistakes.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.5 Parts of Speech   There are eight parts of speech in English. It is important to know how each part functions in a sentence. This subunit will help you review each of the basic parts of speech and offer some help with those parts you may not understand.

1.5.1 The Basic Parts of Speech (Review)   - Explanation: BetterLesson: Christopher Renfrow’s “Parts of Speech Review Packet” Link: BetterLesson: Christopher Renfrow’s “Parts of Speech Review Packet” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Work through this review packet. You may want to print it or just make your own answer sheet. At the end of the packet, the answers for all of the review work are given. This is an excellent way to check your understanding of the eight parts of speech and review.
 
Working through this review should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/3/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the website above.

1.5.2 Identifying Parts of Speech   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Nancy Heilman’s “Building Blocks of Language: The Eight Parts of Speech” Link: SOPHIA: Nancy Heilman’s “Building Blocks of Language: The Eight Parts of Speech” (HTML)
 
Instructions: There is a lot of information on this site, as well as a couple of activities.  Please begin by reading the definition of the eight parts of speech. Then, watch the video of the class singing a catchy rhyme to help them remember the functions of the parts of speech. Next, go through the slides about the eight parts of speech, taking notes on each. The next section offers four good reasons you should bother learning the eight parts of speech. Finally, complete the quick activity to see if you can successfully label the eight parts of speech. The answers to the activity are given right below the activity, so you can check your answers afterward.
 
Completing this tutorial and taking notes should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/1/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/3/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.6 The Writing Process   Ahh, the writing process.... Hmm, if it's a process, then it must have steps or something, right? Actually, it does have very exact steps, and in this subunit, you will get to practice all of them. You will learn to gather your thoughts through brainstorming, organize them into paragraph in a rough draft, and polish them to perfection through editing and revision.

1.6.1 The Beginning Steps of Writing   1.6.1.1 Brainstorming, Planning, Drafting   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Prewriting: Brainstorming” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s "Prewriting: Brainstorming" (Flash)
 
Instructions: Watch this video about how to brainstorm and list as a way to prewrite. Be sure to take good notes about all of the ways you can brainstorm and list. What method do you think you will like best for prewriting?
 
Watching this video and taking notes should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Activity: BetterLesson: New Orleans Collegiate Academies: “Essay Brainstorming Aid” Link: BetterLesson: New Orleans Collegiate Academies: “Essay Brainstorming Aid” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Print a copy of this handout. Look over the prewriting steps offered on the sheet. This is kind of like structured brainstorming. We will look at other methods as well.
     
    Completing this handout should take approximately 5 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Explanation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Brainstorming” Link: The Writing Center at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: “Brainstorming” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this handout. This handout is a keeper if you would like to start a folder or notebook about prewriting techniques. It discusses lots of different ways to brainstorm and walks you through each one. Be sure to take good notes on each technique so you can refer back to them. Also, as you are looking at the different techniques, think about which one you would probably like the best. Although you will want to try a few of them, one or two will probably be more appealing than the others.
     
    Reading this handout and taking notes should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 License. It is attributed to The Writing Center, and the original version can be found here.

  • Explanation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “In-Class Writing Exercises: Brainstorming” Link: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “In-Class Writing Exercises: Brainstorming” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this handout, which reviews brainstorming techniques, elaborates about planning and drafting, and even touches on revision near the end. Again, if you have a folder for writing techniques, this handout would be a great reference. Be sure to take plenty of notes!
     
    Reading this handout and taking notes should take you approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the website above.

1.6.1.2 Practicing with Paragraphs   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Writing Effective Topic Sentences” Link: SOPHIA: Kathryn Reilly’s “Writing Effective Topic Sentences” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this PowerPoint presentation, which begins by comparing a topic sentence to a music conductor. Take notes as you go about good topic sentences. Then, there is a short lesson about transition words. Read through this and take notes as well. Finally, there is a short video about using supporting details in paragraphs. Watch it and take notes.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Web Media: YouTube: David Hunter’s “Body Paragraphs” Link: YouTube: David Hunter’s “Body Paragraphs” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Watch this video about the basic parts of a good body paragraph. Take notes, and practice using these parts when you write paragraphs.
     
    Watching this video and taking notes should take approximately 10 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s “Paragraph” Link: SOPHIA: Sydney Bauer’s "Paragraph" (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Watch this video. As the presenter speaks, she is taking notes about writing paragraphs. Please have paper and pen ready to take these notes with her. Also, she goes through a prewritten paragraph to show all of the information from the notes.
     
    Watching this video and taking notes should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: Curriki: Mr. Harpine’s “Five Paragraph Essay” Link: Curriki: Mr. Harpine’s “Five Paragraph Essay” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: You will need to set up a free account and log in to download the material. You will be applying this format in the next section, but the format is good to look at for single-paragraph construction as well.
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 5 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the website above.

  • Explanation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Paragraph Development” Link: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Paragraph Development” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this handout, which gives three useful examples of how to proceed with paragraph development, depending on what type of paragraph you are writing. After looking over this handout and taking notes, consider the following topic:
     
    Tell about an event in your life that has changed you.
     
    Write one paragraph about this topic, and keep it in your writing notebook. You will use it again when we discuss editing and revision.
     
    Reading this handout and writing the paragraph should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the website above.

1.6.2 Finishing Steps of Writing   1.6.2.1 Editing and Finalizing a Draft   - Explanation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Revising Drafts” Link: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Revising Drafts” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on the link, and read the handout. You must take good notes from this handout if you are not able to print or save it. It gives invaluable information on editing and revising your drafts. It also addresses all of the ways you will try to talk yourself out of revising—pay special attention to why it is so important!
 
Reading this handout should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/). It is
attributed to The Writing Center, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/revising-drafts/).
  • Explanation: BetterLesson: Julie Inwright’s “Proofreading Strategies” Link: BetterLesson: Julie Inwright’s “Proofreading Strategies” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this handout about proofreading strategies and take notes as you read. If you don’t have anyone to listen to you read your paper aloud, try recording yourself reading and then listen for errors afterwards. Be sure to wait an hour or two between recording and proofreading so that you are listening with “fresh ears.” Sometimes we think we hear what we meant to say! Waiting a bit before proofreading can help you hear or see errors you missed the first time. Can you think of any other common mistakes to add to the checklist under number 3?
     
    Reading this handout and taking notes should take approximately 20 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):     

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and the terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: SOPHIA: Ms. K’s “Revising Techniques” Link: SOPHIA: Ms. K’s “Revising Techniques” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: View this tutorial, which begins with a short video and some ideas about using notes in a paper to help with revision. When you get to the part titled “How to Use a Revision Checklist,” print the checklist, if possible. Also, the final slideshow contains great tips for revision, especially if you are revising alone. Take great notes!
     
    Watching this tutorial and taking notes should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.6.2.2 Practicing with Paragraphs   - Activity: Practicing with Paragraphs Practicing with Paragraphs
 
Instructions: Using the rough draft of the paragraph you wrote earlier about something that changed you, revise and edit your paragraph. Be sure to use some of the strategies from the resources you have read or seen. Please keep your paragraph as we will be using it again.
 
Editing and revising your paragraph should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

1.7 Essay Writing   After mastering the writing process, writing an essay is a piece of cake! Basically, the steps of writing are simply expanded from paragraph size into a larger work. The paragraph becomes a part of a larger explanation. Examples or quotations are added for further explanation, and what begins as a simple thesis, or main idea, becomes a full-blown explanation.

1.7.1 Parts (Paragraphs) of a Standard Essay   - Web Media: YouTube: Mary Lou Buell’s “The Five Paragraph Essay” Link: YouTube: Mary Lou Buell’s “The 5 Paragraph Essay” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch this video about how to write using the five paragraph essay “formula.” This instructor uses a “house” graphic organizer to organize information for the essay, and goes through the steps involved to formulate the essay. She also points out that with this particular organizer, it is easy to work on individual sections separately before putting them together in the final essay. Please also take notes and draw out the graphic organizer for future use.
 
Watching this video and taking notes should take approximately 20 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). It is
attributed to Mary Lou Buell, and the original version can be found
[here](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-GtN4EhgyM).

1.7.2 Using the Writing Process to Draft an Essay   Now it’s time to use the writing process to write more than one paragraph. You will take the paragraph you wrote about something that has changed you and expand it into a five-paragraph essay. Ready? Let’s go!

1.7.2.1 Interpreting and Responding to a Prompt   - Explanation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Understanding Assignments” Link: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Understanding Assignments” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this handout. Fortunately, you’ve already responded to this particular prompt, so you’re ahead of the game. However, this handout gives some invaluable advice, so please either take notes or print it for your writing notebook.
 
Reading this handout should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/). It is
attributed to The Writing Center, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/understanding-assignments/).

1.7.2.2 Organizing and Drafting a Response   - Explanation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Thesis Statements” Link: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: The Writing Center's “Thesis Statements” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this handout about thesis statements. Using this handout, and the notes from prior handouts, take your paragraph and polish it into an introductory paragraph with a thesis. Next, develop the rest of your essay using your notes from the subunt about five-paragraph essays.
 
Reading this handout and writing your essay should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/). It is
attributed to The Writing Center, and the original version can be
found
[here](http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/thesis-statements/).

1.7.3 Editing/Identifying Mistakes in Writing   - Web Media: BetterLesson: Uplift’s “Self Edit” Link: BetterLesson: Uplift’s “Self Edit” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This is a great basic checklist for self-editing.  Read over it, and save a copy for future editing.
 
Looking over this checklist should take approximately 5 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

1.7.4 Self-Analysis and Self-Evaluation of Writing   - Did I Get This? Activity: BetterLesson: New Orleans Collegiate Academies: “Student Friendly GEE Rubric” Link: BetterLesson: New Orleans Collegiate Academies: “Student Friendly GEE Rubric” (HTML)
 
Instructions: If possible, print this evaluation rubric. Then, go through your essay, applying the criteria of the rubric. Do this two times, about two hours apart. Hopefully, by doing the evaluation twice, you can have a fresh approach the second time. Be as honest with yourself as possible, and also have someone else read and evaluate your work if you can.
 
Evaluating your essay should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/9-10/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

Extension Resources   I know, I know...you just can’t get enough of this awesome class! I totally understand, so here are some other things for you to read and enjoy that will enhance what you have already learned.

  • Reading: The Elements of Style by William Strunk, Jr. and E. B. White Not many textbooks from college gain a permanent place on one’s personal bookshelf, but this one has been with me since my freshman year. This little book contains a wealth of information about basic writing fundamentals. I guess it’s really a reference book, but it’s a great read as well. It’s definitely worth investing your time and money for a copy. I bet you will be surprised at how many times you refer to it in the future.

  • Reading: Grammar Girl’s Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing by Mignon Fogarty This book is like The Elements of Style, but with a modern, sassy twist. Fogarty also has podcasts about grammar that you can download. The book is great with or without the podcasts. It’s one of those books that you accidentally learn from while enjoying. Another reference-type book, you will visit it again and again.