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K12ELA008: English Language Arts 8

Unit 2: The World of Art   This unit features a full-length nonfiction text about the role art has played in our world. In addition to providing you with needed opportunities to practice reading nonfiction, it exposes you to interesting content you likely have not seen before. By the end of this unit, you will have improved skills and a deeper knowledge base, which includes a substantial amount of new vocabulary. Skills acquired in the first unit will support you as they tackle new words.
 
You will continue through the writing process, using editing checklists and rubrics to help you evaluate the first drafts of your narrative. By the end of this unit, your final draft will be completed.
 
The language portion will include a review of key conventions, including capitalization, punctuation, and spelling rules.

Unit 2 Time Advisory
This unit should take you approximately 10 hours and 40 minutes to complete.
 
☐    Subunit 2.1: 6 hours and 5 minutes ☐    Subunit 2.1.1: 3 hours and 5 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.1.2: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 2.2: 55 minutes ☐    Subunit 2.2.1: 45 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.2.2: 10 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.3: 1 hour and 55 minutes ☐    Subunit 2.3.1: 45 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.3.2: 1 hour and 10 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.4: 45 minutes ☐    Subunit 2.4.1: 20 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.4.2: 15 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.4.3: 10 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.5: 1 hour ☐    Subunit 2.5.1: 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.5.2: 30 minutes

Unit2 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
- Demonstrate factual knowledge about artistic periods and styles. - Use text features, including illustrations, charts, headings and sub-headings to comprehend informational text. - Show mastery of conventions of language, including capitalization, spelling, and punctuation. - Complete the second phase of the narrative essay, using the writing process.

Standards Addressed (Common Core): - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.7 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.10 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.4

2.1 Reading Informational Text: *The Book of Art for Young People*   This unit will expose you to informational text, allowing you to develop and practice important reading skills that you will need for the rest of this course. In addition to reading skills, you will also develop a strong knowledge base in the history of art, a valuable topic to know about.

2.1.1 Reading Comprehension   - Reading: Books Should be Free: Agnes Ethel Conway and Sir Martin Conway’s *The Book of Art for Young People* Link: Books Should be Free: Agnes Ethel Conway and Sir Martin Conway’s The Book of Art for Young People (HTML)
 
Instructions: Before you read, spend some time previewing the text. Previewing helps you get a better idea of what you’re going to be reading. Since this is an art book, follow the link in the text box at right and spend some time examining the 16 accompanying paintings. Also, read the titles to the book’s 15 chapters listed in the “Stream Audiobook” box on Books Should be Free.

-   What do you notice about the way the authors chose to organize
    the information in the book?
-   What places are mentioned?
-   What historic periods are referenced?
-   What ideas do you already have about *The Book of Art for Young
    People*?

It should take approximately 30 minutes to preview the book and
respond to the questions.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/8/7)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.1.1 Author’s Purpose or Point of View   - Reading: Project Gutenberg: Agnes Ethel Conway and Sir Martin Conway’s The Book of Art for Young People: “Chapter 1: The Children’s Book of Art” Link: Project Gutenberg: Agnes Ethel Conway and Sir Martin Conway’s The Book of Art for Young People: “Chapter 1: The Children’s Book of Art” (HTML)

 Also Available in:  
 [Text
File](http://www.booksshouldbefree.com/download/text/The-Book-of-Art-for-Young-People.txt)  
    
 Instructions: Read Chapter 1, the introduction to the book. As you
read the first few paragraphs, think about the authors’ purpose, an
idea we explored in Unit 1.

-   What did the authors want you to think about?
-   Why did they compare storytelling and art? Were they attempting
    to persuade, entertain, inform, or describe?
-   Can you identify evidence to support your choice?

You should note that the first and second chapters do not discuss
specific paintings, but the remaining chapters do.  

 It should take approximately 20 minutes to read Chapter 1.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/8/6)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.1.2 Fact and Opinion   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: “Graphic Organizer: Fact vs. Opinion” Link: The Saylor Foundation: “Graphic Organizer: Fact vs. Opinion” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Distinguishing between fact and opinion is a necessary reading skill. As you are reading through The Book of Art for Young People, pay close attention to what the author states as fact, which can be proven, and opinion, which is subjective. Words like, “most,” “best” “worst,” “beautiful,” and “ugly” can be hard to qualify. The graphic organizer, linked above, can help you keep track of some of the more notable facts and opinions you come across. Print out a copy for note-taking as you read through the book.
 
It should take approximately 10 minutes to read the information about the graphic organizer, and print out a copy for note-taking.

 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/8/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Project Gutenberg: Agnes Ethel Conway and Sir Martin Conway’s The Book of Art for Young People: “Chapter 2 - 6: The Children’s Book of Art” Link: Project Gutenberg: Agnes Ethel Conway and Sir Martin Conway’s The Book of Art for Young People: “Chapter 2 - 6: The Children’s Book of Art” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read Chapter 2 through Chapter 6 of The Book of Art for Young People. As you read, keep a look out for good examples of fact and opinion. Write them down on your graphic organizer.

    It should take approximately 45 minutes to read the chapters and make notes about the reading’s facts and opinions.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.1.3 Classifying and Categorizing Information   - Web Media: SOPHIA: Jodi Owens-Kristenson’s “Reading Strategy: Use Text Structure as You Read” Link: SOPHIA: Jodi Owens-Kristenson’s “Reading Strategy: Use Text Structure as You Read” (HTML) (Flash)
 
Instructions: Begin by reading the information at the top of the webpage about the goals for the tutorial. Then view the second presentation, “Using Text Structure to Guide Thinking While Reading Expository Text,” which will give you strategies to use while reading The Book of Art for Young People. If you find that The Book of Art for Young People is challenging to read, you can return to this tutorial for ideas to help you understand the text.
 
It should take approximately 20 minutes to study the tutorial.

 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/8/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Project Gutenberg: Agnes Ethel Conway and Sir Martin Conway’s The Book of Art for Young People: “Chapter 7 - 12: The Children’s Book of Art” Link: Project Gutenberg: Agnes Ethel Conway and Sir Martin Conway’s The Book of Art for Young People: “Chapter 7 - 12: The Children’s Book of Art” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read Chapter 7 through Chapter 12 of The Book of Art for Young People. When you have finished reading, write a short reflection in your notebook where you describe your experience reading the text and evaluate the usefulness of the tutorial.

    • Did you find the tutorial useful?
    • Did you find you used the tips from the tutorial to help you understand the text?
    • Did you use any other strategies that you’d learned previously to help you comprehend the text?

    Standards Addressed (Common Core): - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.10

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.2 Analyzing the Text   2.1.2.1 Meanings of New Words   - Reading: Project Gutenberg: Agnes Ethel Conway and Sir Martin Conway’s The Book of Art for Young People: “Chapter 13 - 15: The Children’s Book of Art” Link: Project Gutenberg: Agnes Ethel Conway and Sir Martin Conway’s The Book of Art for Young People: “Chapter 13 - 15: The Children’s Book of Art” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read Chapter 13 through Chapter 15 of The Book of Art for Young People. Your next activity will involve looking for new terms, people, places, and works of art, so you should keep this in mind as you read.
 
It should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes to finish reading the text.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/8/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/8/10)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Tracy Derrell’s “Taking Notes on New Words and Their Meanings” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Tracy Derrell’s “Taking Notes on New Words and Their Meanings” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: The Book of Art for Young People contains many art-related terms and other terms and vocabulary that are probably new for you. Going forward, it will be helpful to retain some of these words, as you will continue to use knowledge about art and history in your future reading and analysis. Please choose 10 to 15 terms, events, people, places, or works of art from The Book of Art for Young People that are interesting to you, and write them in the chart, explaining each briefly.
     
    It should take approximately 45 minutes to identify the10 - 15 terms and write the explanations in your notebook.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.2.2 Advantages and Disadvantages of Digital Text   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Tracy Derrell’s “T-Chart Organizer for Reading and Writing” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Tracy Derrell’s “T-Chart Organizer for Reading and Writing” (PDF)
 
Instructions: You have now read two complete digital texts and an excerpt from a digital text.

-   How would you describe your experience?
-   As you have worked through these texts, what advantages have you
    found?
-   What disadvantages have you found?

Click the above link to take you to the t-chart organizer. Note two
to four advantages of digital texts and two to four disadvantages of
digital texts as a prewriting activity. Then use those notes to help
you write a well-organized response.  
    
 It should take approximately 45 minutes to complete the prewriting
activity and write the draft.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/8/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2 Writing   During this unit you will continue to work on the narrative essay you started in Unit 1. Your first draft should be complete or nearly complete. You will proceed through the next stages of the writing process and soon have a finished piece.

2.2.1 Proofreading, Editing, and Revising   - Did I Get This? Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Tracy Derrell’s “Checklist for Evaluating Writing” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Tracy Derrell’s “Checklist for Evaluating Writing” (PDF)
 
Instructions: You are going to be proofreading, editing, and revising the draft you created during Unit 1. Click on the link above to access the checklist, which contains the same elements as the rubric, and read through it. The checklist’s purpose is to help you review your writing by identifying its strengths and weaknesses. Each element also includes tips to help you improve your draft, which you should revisit as you revise. After you’re familiar with the checklist, use it to help you edit and revise your paper. If you are comfortable with the idea of a friend or parent reading your draft, you should let that person look at it and give you some feedback.
 
It should take approximately 45 minutes to review your draft with the checklist and identify and make the necessary revisions.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/8/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.2 Choosing Appropriate Vocabulary   - Reading: SOPHIA: Linda Neuman’s “Concise Language: Avoiding Elevated Language” Link: SOPHIA: Linda Neuman’s “Clear and Concise: Avoiding Elevated Language” (PPT)
 
Instructions: This tutorial will help you improve your writing by choosing the right words for your purpose and audience. It includes information about avoiding wordiness, a common issue among student writers. As you revise the writing you do for this course, you may find it helpful to refer back here to support the revision process.
 
It should take approximately 10 minutes to read through the material in the presentation.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/8/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.3 Speaking and Listening   During this subunit, you will learn how to write and deliver a speech. You may have already been assigned to give a speech in class, but if you haven’t, you probably will soon. It’s an important skill; students and people in a wide variety of professions are often called upon to speak in public.

2.3.1 Writing a Short Speech   - Activity: Curriki: Mr. Harpine’s “Speech Writing Outline” Link: Curriki: Mr. Harpine’s “Speech Writing Outline” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Download and read this document, which contains details about the organization of a speech. You will find that it’s basically identical to how you organize an essay, with an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. After you read the information, use the bottom half of the page to help you draft an idea for a speech. You can talk about anything you like - maybe a special person or place, or maybe you’ll talk about a topic or activity that’s important to you. For this activity, the focus is on learning how to format and deliver a speech. Select a topic you already know a lot about so you can place all of your energy on learning the proper format for a speech.
 
It should take approximately 45 minutes to read the document and draft your outline.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/8/1)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.3.2 How to Give a Speech   2.3.2.1 Fear of Public Speaking   - Reading: SOPHIA: Nikki Hansen’s “Speaking in Class” Link: SOPHIA: Nikki Hansen's “Speaking in Class” (HTML) (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Read through the beginning of this tutorial, which addresses the common anxieties experienced by students who have to speak in front of large groups. After you have read through the material, watch the video, and then read through the additional tips that come below the video. When you have finished, write a short reflection in your notebook where you discuss your thoughts about the topic and how they apply to your own feelings toward public speaking.
 
It should take approximately 30 minutes to read through all the material, watch the video, and write your reflection.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/8/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.3.2.2 Evaluating a Speech   - Web Media: MERLOT: Lisa Lewin’s “Do You Believe in Me? A Student’s Challenge to Teachers” Link: MERLOT: Lisa Lewin’s “Do You Believe in Me? A Student’s Challenge to Teachers” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Open this website and click on “Location: Go to Material” to view this 10-year-old student's motivational speech. When you are done, write a half-page reaction in your notebook. What are your thoughts in general? What does the speaker do well that you can do when you give your speech?
 
It should take approximately 20 minutes to watch the video and write your reaction.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/8/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.3.2.3 Delivering a Presentation   - Activity: SOPHIA: Nikki Hansen’s “Presentations” Link: SOPHIA: Nikki Hansen’s “Presentations” (HTML) (PPT) (YouTube)
 
Instructions: This tutorial has information about the basic components of a presentation, along with tips on delivering a presentation. Read the text at the top, then view the slide show, “Top Ten Tips for Giving a Presentation.” The slides contain additional information, which you should summarize in your notebook. Finally, watch the video, which features additional public speaking tips.

 It should take approximately 20 minutes to read the information,
study the slides, and watch the video.  
    
 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/8/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.4 Language   This subunit will delve into some important skills that you should be able to master quickly. You will review capital letters in depth, and learn about proper uses for commas and end punctuation. Finally, you will get some helpful tips on proper spelling.

2.4.1 Demonstrate Knowledge of When to Use Capital Letters   - Explanation: The Saylor Foundation: Tracy Derrell’s “Those Crazy Capital Letters!” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Tracy Derrell’s “Those Crazy Capital Letters!” (PPT)
 
Instructions: This presentation addresses the use capital letters. If you find there are any instances you often have trouble with, for example, days, months, and holidays, you may want to take notes that you can refer to on an as-needed basis.
 
It should take approximately 20 minutes to study all the material in this presentation.

 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/8/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.4.2 Use Punctuation to Indicate Pauses and to End Sentences   - Explanation: The Saylor Foundation: Tracy Derrell’s “End Punctuation and Commas” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Tracy Derrell’s “End Punctuation and Commas” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read the explanations and examples for the four punctuation marks. As you work on different writing assignments, you can refer to this document for support.
 
It should take approximately 15 minutes to read through the two pages, though if you want to take any notes for future reference, you will need some additional time.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/8/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.4.3 Apply Rules to Ensure Proper Spelling   - Web Media: TED-Ed: Gina Cooke’s “Making Sense of Spelling” Link: TED-Ed: Gina Cooke’s “Making Sense of Spelling” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: This short video has some important information and ideas to help you spell better. When you have finished watching the video, complete the five multiple-choice and three open-ended questions that follow.
 
It should take approximately 10 minutes to watch the video and respond to the questions.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/8/2)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.5 Assessments   This subunit contains some assessment tools to help you evaluate and monitor your learning. You are going to read an excerpt from The Art of Public Speaking by Dale Carnegie and write short responses to questions. You will also complete assessment items focusing on language and spelling. 

2.5.1 Reading and Writing   - Checkpoint: The Saylor Foundation: Tracy Derrell’s “Reading and Writing” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Tracy Derrell’s “Reading and Writing” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Click on the link above to complete the assessment. It is designed to test your understanding of the skills and concepts in Unit 2. Complete all tasks in your notebook. Each paragraph response should be five to seven sentences. To check your answers, click here.
 
It should take approximately 30 minutes to complete this assessment.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/8/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/8/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/8/5)

Terms of Use: Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms
of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.5.2 Speaking, Listening, and Language   - Checkpoint: The Saylor Foundation: Tracy Derrell’s “Speaking, Listening, and Language” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Tracy Derrell’s “Speaking, Listening, and Language” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Click on the link above to complete the assessment. It is designed to test your understanding of the skills and concepts from Unit 2. You can print out the pages and complete the first eight items directly on the page. The last two items should be completed in your notebook. To check your answers, click here.
 
It should take approximately 30 minutes to complete this assessment, which includes short answer tasks and two brief written responses.

 Standards Addressed (*Common Core*):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/8/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/8/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/8/4)

Terms of Use: Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms
of use displayed on the webpage above.

Extension Resources   If any of the readings in this unit have inspired you to learn more, the following list will help you. It contains books and other resources you can use for further study. You will most likely be able to find many of these items in your local public library. 

  • Reading: Chasing Vermeer, The Wright 3, and The Calder Game by Blue Balliet This trio of mysteries features Petra and Calder, students at Chicago’s Lab School. Author Blue Balliet has created each of these mysteries around the works of famous artists and artwork. 

  • Reading: Vincent Van Gogh: Portrait of an Artist by Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan Artist biographies for young adult readers are hard to come by. However, students who want to learn more about Vincent Van Gogh will enjoy this true account of his life, which includes his boyhood and the careers he pursued before dedicating himself full time to art.

  • Reading: Eyewitness Art: Composition by Sarah Kent and Eyewitness Art: Color by Alison Cole These books address key elements of art and would be highly recommended for students who may be interested in pursuing careers in art.