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K12ELA007: English Language Arts 7

Unit 5: Figurative Language, Poetry, and Fantasy   In this unit, you will learn about specific types of figurative language and how they are used in literature. You will analyze poems, stories, myths, and tall tales to discover the influence figurative language -as well as other playful language, like exaggeration -has on literature. You will practice writing metaphors, similes, and other types of figurative language and play games to master the different parts of words (prefix, suffix). You will read some classic Greek myths and American tall tales, both great influences on modern literature and media. 

Unit 5 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take approximately 35 hours and 30 minutes.

☐    Subunit 5.1: 4 hours and 45 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.2: 7 hours and 45 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.2.1: 3 hours and 15 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.2.2: 2 hours and 15 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.2.3: 2 hours and 15 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.3: 5 hours and 45 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.3.1: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 5.3.2: 45 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.3.3: 2 hours and 15 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.3.4: 45 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.4: 10 hours

☐    Subunit 5.4.1: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 5.4.2: 1 hour and 45 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.4.3: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 5.4.4: 4 hours

☐    Subunit 5.4.5: 1 hour and 15 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.5: 5 hours and 45 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.5.1: 1 hour and 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.5.2: 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.5.3: 1 hour and 15 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.5.4: 1 hour and 15 minutes

☐    Subunit 5.5.5: 1 hour and 15 minutes

☐    Unit Review: 1 hour

☐    Unit Checkpoint: 30 minutes

Unit5 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to: - Define figurative language and its purpose. - Define, identify, and write examples of simile, metaphor, hyperbole, personification, and onomatopoeia. - Analyze poems for structure and use of figurative language. - Identify themes in poems and how language can affect emotion. - Analyze a short story for themes, identifying figurative language. - Define unfamiliar vocabulary in texts. - Use content details to support analysis of poems, stories, myths, and tall tales. - Explain “hubris” and other common themes in Greek myths. - Define exaggeration and identify how playful language is used in tall tales.

Standards Addressed (Common Core): - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.7 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.8 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.9 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.9 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.10 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.6

5.1 Introduction to Figurative Language   This subunit will serve as an introduction to figurative language, also known as “picture language.” Figurative language is often used in poetry and literature to add special effects, like increasing the senses (taste, sound, etc.) or making comparisons. After completing this subunit, you will be able to define and identify figurative language, including the most common types of figurative language that are often found in literature. 

5.1.1 Definition and Purpose   - Activity: Digital Learning Collaborative: “Figuring Out Figurative Language” Link: Digital Learning Collaborative: “Figuring Out Figurative Language” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read the article on figurative language. Take notes on the types and their definitions, and then watch the four videos that follow. If possible, share your thoughts on figurative language with a friend or relative. When you are finished, click on the three links under “Step 1” in the “Follow Up Discussion” section to read what other students have said about figurative language.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.1.2 Types of Figurative Language   In this subunit, you will learn about five of the most common types of figurative language used in literature: simile, metaphor, hyperbole, personification, and onomatopoeia. After learning about each type of figurative language, you will be able to identify them in literature and understand how figurative language contributes to the meaning of a poem or story. 

5.1.2.1 Simile   - Explanation: Whitemouth School’s ELA 10F: “Similes” Link: Whitemouth School’s ELA 10F: “Similes” (HTML)
 
Instructions: As you read this article about similes, take notes on the definition of a simile and a few of the given examples. When you are finished reading and taking notes, write down five original examples of similes. For the original examples, use five ordinary items from the room that you are in.
 
Reading this article and completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.1.2.2 Metaphor   - Activity: Ms. Linder’s English: “Metaphor and Simile” Link: Ms. Linder’sEnglish: “Metaphor and Simile” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read the section on metaphors (skip the simile section), taking notes on the definition of a metaphor and a few of the given examples. When you are finished reading and taking notes, write down five original examples of metaphors. For the original examples, use five ordinary items from the room that you are in.
 
Reading this selection, taking notes, and completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.1.2.3 Hyperbole   - Activity: Shannon School of Business: Cape Breton University Marketing: “Hyperbole” Link: Shannon School of Business: Cape Breton University Marketing: “Hyperbole” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this article and watch the video on hyperbole. Take notes on the definition of hyperbole and a few of the given examples. When you are finished reading and taking notes, write down five original examples of hyperbole. For the original examples, describe five people that you know using hyperbole.
 
Reading this article, taking notes, and completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.1.2.4 Personification   - Activity: M. J. Carlson’s HL A1 English: “Personification” Link: M. J. Carlson’s HL A1 English: “Personification” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this article on personification. Take notes on the definition of personification and a few of the given examples. When you are finished reading and taking notes, write down five original examples of personification. For the original examples, use five things that you can see outside your window.
 
Reading this article, taking notes, and completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.1.2.5 Onomatopoeia   - Activity: Ms. Linder’s English: “Onomatopoeia” Link: Ms. Linder’sEnglish: “Onomatopoeia” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this article on onomatopoeia. Take notes on the definition of onomatopoeia and a few of the given examples. When you are finished reading and taking notes, write down five original examples of onomatopoeia. For the original examples, use household appliances and devices, describing the sounds they make.
 
Reading this article, taking notes, and completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.2 Poetry   In this subunit, you will read and analyze three unique poems. You will analyze how structure and language, including figurative language, contribute to the effectiveness of the poems. You will also identify specific examples of figurative language that occur in the poems. 

5.2.1 “Jabberwocky” by Lewis Carroll   - Reading: Dr. Eskin’s English Lit for Cocktail Parties: Lewis Carroll’s “Jabberwocky” Link: Dr. Eskin’s English Lit for Cocktail Parties: Lewis Carroll’s “Jabberwocky” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read the short biography on Lewis Carroll, the author of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Open the link for the poem “Jabberwocky” and read it twice: once silently and a second time aloud. Print out a copy of the poem. As an alternative to printing, you can bookmark the poem so that you can easily return to it for later review. Next, watch the accompanying video. When finished, you will complete the activities in the next subunits to further analyze the poem.
 
Reading these selections, watching the video, and completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.2.1.1 Structure of “Jabberwocky”   - Activity: Patterns in “Jabberwocky” Instructions: Reread “Jabberwocky.” Since the poem reads like gibberish, it is interesting to see that it is actually carefully structured and crafted. Take your printed copy of the poem and underline rhyming words (use different colors to separate pairs of words) and jot down the number of syllables after each line. Answer the following questions in a paragraph:
Did Carroll use similar syllable patterns on purpose or was it just a coincidence?
How can you tell?
 
Reading these selections and completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)

5.2.1.2 Meaning of “Jabberwocky”   - Activity: Elaine Webber’s GED Prep and Advanced ESL: “Poetry Analysis Sheet” Link: Elaine Webber’s GED Prep and Advanced ESL: “Poetry Analysis Sheet” (PDF)
 
Instructions: “Jabberwocky” can be difficult to understand because of the many words that Carroll made up. Print the “Poetry Analysis Sheet” and complete it for the poem “Jabberwocky.” If you cannot access a printer, simply respond to the questions in your notebook.
 
Completing this worksheet should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/7)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.2.1.3 Use of Figurative Language   - Activity: Adam Kral’s “Jabberwocky’” Link: Adam Kral’s “Jabberwocky” (Prezi)
 
Instructions: View the Prezi on “Jabberwocky,” paying special attention to the section on poetic devices. Take your printed copy of “Jabberwocky” and circle the examples of rhyme scheme, repetition, imagery, onomatopoeia, alliteration and end rhyme that you can find in the poem. Use a different color or symbol to mark each type of poetic device.
 
Reading this presentation and completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/7)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/6)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.2.2 “I, Too, Sing America” by Langston Hughes   - Reading: Ms. McCann’s Harlem Renaissance Poet Project: “Langston Hughes” Link: Ms. McCann’s Harlem Renaissance Poet Project: “Langston Hughes” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read the short biography on Langston Hughes. Read the poem “I, Too, Sing America” twice: once silently and a second time aloud. Print out a copy of the poem and read the analysis given after the poem. If you do not have access to a printer, simply bookmark the poem so that you can come back to it later. When finished, you will complete the activities in the next subunits to further analyze the poem.
 
Reading these selections and completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.2.2.1 Meaning of “I, Too, Sing America”   - Activity: Elaine Webber’s GED Prep and Advanced ESL: “Poetry Analysis Sheet” Link: Elaine Webber’s GED Prep and Advanced ESL: “Poetry Analysis Sheet” (PDF)
 
Instructions: “I, Too, Sing America” is written in free verse, so it does not have a specific structure or rhythm. It also does not have complicated vocabulary, so it is easy to understand and pleasant to read. To gain a better understanding of the poem, print and complete the “Poetry Analysis Sheet” using “I, Too, Sing America.” If you do not have access to a printer, simply write your responses in your notebook.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/7)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.2.2.2 Use of Figurative Language   - Activity: Figurative Language in “I, Too, Sing America” Instructions: Hughes’s poem is simple and straightforward, so it does not contain much figurative language. The obvious metaphor is in the last line when he writes, “I, too, am America.” Based on your analysis of the poem and Hughes’s biography, write a paragraph explaining how Hughes IS America and why he chose this particular metaphor. Use details from the poem, his biography, and your own knowledge of civil rights history to support your response.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/6)

5.2.3 “A Bird Came Down the Walk” by Emily Dickinson   - Reading: Brooklyn College: Lilia Melani’s “Emily Dickinson: Dickinson’s Life” Link:Brooklyn College: Lilia Melani’s “Emily Dickinson: Dickinson’s Life” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this biography of Emily Dickinson in preparation for analyzing one of her poems. When finished with the biography section, read the other sections on the webpage.
 
Reading this poem should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.2.3.1 Meaning of “A Bird Came Down the Walk”   - Activity: Elaine Webber’s GED Prep and Advanced ESL: “Poetry Analysis Sheet” Link: Elaine Webber’s GED Prep and Advanced ESL: “Poetry Analysis Sheet” (PDF)
 
Instructions: The poem “A Bird Came Down the Walk” is written with specific rhyme and meter patterns. Look over the poem from the previous subunit and notice where words rhyme. It does not have complicated vocabulary and strong sensory images. To gain a better understanding of the poem, print and complete the “Poetry Analysis Sheet” from the link above. If you are unable to print, simply write the responses to the analysis sheet into your notebook.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/7)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.2.3.2 Use of Figurative Language   - Activity: Figurative Language in “A Bird Came Down the Walk” Instructions: Dickinson’s poem has strong sensory images as she describes the bird’s appearance and action. Her poetry is often full of figurative language. Take your printed version of the poem and underline the similes. Circle an example of personification in the final stanza (last four lines). As an alternative to printing, you can write the poem into your notebook and then mark the text. Finally, write a well-developed paragraph or two explaining the following: What senses (sight, sound, touch, taste, smell) does Dickinson’s poem invoke? Use examples from the poem to support your responses.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/6)

5.3 Short Story: “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi” by Rudyard Kipling   Figurative language is not just used in poetry. It can occur in novels, nonfiction, and short stories. You will read a short story by the author Rudyard Kipling, who also wrote The Jungle Book. This imaginative tale about a pet mongoose in India is full of strong sensory images and examples of figurative language. To better understand the story, you will complete a Webquest, vocabulary exercises, guiding reading questions, and a figurative language scavenger hunt. 

5.3.1 About the Author and Story Background   - Interactive Lab: LaToya Gay’s 7th Grade English: “‘Rikki Tikki Tavi’ Webquest and Brochure” Link: LaToya Gay’s 7th Grade English: “‘Rikki Tikki Tavi’ Webquest and Brochure” (HTML)
 
Instructions: To get a better understanding of the story, you will complete a webquest on the author, the story’s setting, and the animals involved in the story. Follow the directions for the “Part 1” webquest. Complete all of the activities independently and write down responses in your notebook.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 2 hours.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.3.2 Vocabulary   - Activity: Quizlet: “Rikki Tikki Tavi Vocabulary” Link: Quizlet: “Rikki Tikki Tavi Vocabulary” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Open the link with vocabulary for the story. Review the 15 terms and their meanings. After reviewing the vocabulary twice, write an original sentence for each term. If you cannot access the website, click here for a PDF version of the vocabulary words.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/6)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.3.3 eading and Guided Questions   - Activity: Rita Booth’s Quarter Horses: “Guided Reading Questions for ‘Rikki-Tikki-Tavi’” Link: Rita Booth’s Quarter Horses: “Guided Reading Questions for ‘Rikki-Tikki-Tavi’” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Print these guided reading questions, or if you cannot print, simply respond to the questions in your notebook. You will complete them as you read “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi” in the following activity.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.3.4 Use of Figurative Language   - Activity: is93-ela-7th: “Figurative Language Scavenger Hunt” Link: is93-ela-7th: “Figurative Language Scavenger Hunt” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Define each term. Use online resources if needed. Find an example of each type of figurative language in “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi,” writing the examples on the organizer or in your notebook.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/6)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 Generic
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/).

5.4 Mythology   In this subunit, you will learn about Greek mythology, which has greatly influenced modern literature and even media and advertising. You will review Greek parts of words (roots, prefixes, and suffixes) and learn about the history of Greek mythology, including the idea of “hubris,” a fatal flaw. You will learn about the major gods and goddesses and look at two myths in depth: Hercules and Perseus. 

5.4.1 Grammar: Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots   - Activity: Jessica Truell’s English: “Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots Oh My!” Link: Jessica Truell’s English: “Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots Oh My!” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Many parts of the words that we use today have their origins in the Greek language. While reading this article, take notes on prefixes, suffixes, and root words, including the parts of given words and their definitions. Using the given lists, put together five words (for example, the root “psych” and the suffix “ology” create “psychology”).
 
Reading this selection, taking notes, and completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes. 
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/6)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.4.2 History and “Hubris”   - Reading: Rachel Morgan’s Antigone Mythology: “Why Bother with Greek Mythology?” Link: Rachel Morgan’s Antigone Mythology: “Why Bother with Greek Mythology?” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This article discusses the origins of Greek mythology and why we still read the myths today. Greek mythology often explores the idea of “hubris,” which is a character’s large ego or pride. This is seen as a dangerous characteristic that often leads to a character’s downfall.
 
Reading this article should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.4.3 Greek Gods and Goddesses   - Activity: McGavock English 1: Mythology: “Before Beginning Mythology” and “Greek and Roman Mythology: A Review of the Principal Gods and Goddesses” Link: McGavock English 1Mythology: “Before Beginning Mythology” (PDF) and “Greek and Roman Mythology: A Review of the Principal Gods and Goddesses” (PowerPoint)
 
Instructions: Now you are going to learn about the major gods and goddesses in Greek mythology. First, complete the worksheet titled “Before Beginning Mythology.” When you are finished, open the PowerPoint presentation titled “Greek and Roman Mythology: A Review of the Principal Gods and Goddesses.” Take notes while viewing the presentation, writing down the names of the major gods and goddesses and their characteristics.
 
Completing these activities, watching the presentation, and taking notes should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/6)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
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5.4.4 Reading: “Hercules”   - Reading: Pepperdine University: Hum 111: “Heracles (Hercules)” Link: Pepperdine University: Hum 111: “Heracles (Hercules)” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read the story of Hercules, one of the most popular Greek myths. Take notes on the major plot events in the story and the 12 labors that Hercules performed.
 
Reading this selection and taking notes should take approximately 1 hour.

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/6)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).
  • Activity: Ms. Faulk’s SLMS - 7th Grade ELA/SS: “Hercules Movie-Text Compare-Contrast” Link: Ms. Faulk’s SLMS - 7th Grade ELA/SS: “Hercules Movie-Text Compare-Contrast” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: There are many interpretations of Greek myths such as Hercules. Do a web search using the terms “Hercules myth” and read at least three different versions of the story. We are going to compare the myths you just read with the Disney film Hercules. If you have not seen the film, try to access a version that you can watch, through a video provider such as Hulu, Netflix, etc. If you do not have access to one, try searching for a version or clip available online. If you cannot access the Disney film, do a web search using the terms “Hercules myth video” and select any video versions of the story that allow you to complete the assignment. Next, click the link above to access the Hercules Movie-Text Compare-Contrast organizer. Fill in the boxes in the first column based on the myths you read. Then fill in the boxes in the second column based on the movie.

    Completing this activity should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

  • Activity: Disney vs Mythical Hercules: “Disney vs Mythical Hercules” Link: Disney vs Mythical Hercules: “Disney vs Mythical Hercules” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: With the organizer you completed in the previous resource on hand, read more about differences between the movie and mythology versions of Hercules at the link above.
    Did you notice the same differences?
    Do you agree with why the writer thinks the movie version and myth versions are different?
     
    Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

5.4.5 Reading: “Perseus”   - Web Media: Dorchester ARTS: “Perseus and the Medusa” Link: Dorchester ARTS: “Perseus and the Medusa” (Flash)
 
Instructions: Watch the video twice.
 
Watching this video should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.2](www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/7)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.5 Tall Tales   In this subunit, you will learn about “tall tales,” a part of American heritage. Often created to explain how things work or began (ex: echoes, the weather in Arizona), tall tales use exaggeration to catch the reader’s attention. In addition to learning about the history of tall tales, you will carefully read two classic tales and study how exaggeration is important in telling tall tales. 

5.5.1 Characteristics and Purpose   - Explanation: People and History 1: “American Tall Tales” Link: People and History 1: “American Tall Tales” (HTML)(YouTube)
 
Instructions: Complete the activities for “Day 1.” Watch all five videos and answer the questions for each. If the videos are unavailable, you can find alternative versions of the tall tales on YouTube or TeacherTube. The stories are “Johnny Appleseed,” “Pecos Bill,” “Paul Bunyan,” “The Brave Engineer - An American Legend,” and “John Henry.” You will need to conduct online research to answer some of the questions.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/7)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/9)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.5.2 History   - Explanation: Sherer Tall Tales: “What Is a Tall Tale?” Link: Sherer Tall Tales: “What Is a Tall Tale?” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read the information on tall tales. In your notes, define “tall tale” and write down the eight major elements of tall tales.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/3)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/).

5.5.3 Exaggeration and Figurative Language   - Web Media: SkreenPlay.tv: “Mel-O-Toons: Paul Bunyan (1960)” Link: SkreenPlay.tv: “Mel-O-Toons: Paul Bunyan (1960)” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: You are going to look at a tall tale and identify exaggeration that is used in the story. Watch this video, and write down three examples of exaggeration in the story.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/7)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/SL/7/2)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

5.5.4 Reading: “Paul Bunyan Tames the Whistling River”   - Reading: American Folklore: S. E. Schlosser’s retelling of “Paul Bunyan Tames the Whistling River” Link: American Folklore: S. E. Schlosser’s retelling of “Paul Bunyan Tames the Whistling River” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this classic tall tale about Paul Bunyan in preparation for the next assignment.
 
Reading this story should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)

Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

5.5.5 Reading: “Brer Fox Goes Hunting”   - Reading: American Folklore: S. E. Schlosser’s retelling of “Brer Fox Goes Hunting” Link: American Folklore: S. E. Schlosser’s retelling of “Brer Fox Goes Hunting” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this classic tall tale about Brer Rabbit in preparation for the next assignment.
 
Reading this story should take approximately 30 minutes. 
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/6)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/7/10)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/3)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/4)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/7/5)

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Unit Checkpoint   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 5 Review” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 5 Review” (PDF)
 
Instructions: It is now time to prepare for the unit assessment. Use this guide to assist you in choosing what items to study.
 
Completing this review should take approximately 1 hour. 

  • Checkpoint: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 5 Checkpoint” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Unit 5 Checkpoint” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: To complete Unit 5, you need to pass the unit checkpoint. You cannot use your notes while completing the assessment. When you are done, check your work with the “Answer Key”. In order to pass, you need to get 7 out of 10 possible points. If you do not pass the first time, review your notes and retake the test until you do.
     
    Completing this checkpoint should take approximately 30 minutes.