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K12ELA006: English Language Arts 6

Unit 4: Knowledge Is Power   In a world where knowledge is power, and where you have access to information on virtually anything at your fingertips, you need to learn how to make sense of and sort through your resources. In this unit, you will practice locating and integrating information from multiple sources by reading selected short texts about some pivotal events in American history. You will learn to compare and contrast various authors’ perspectives and approaches to presenting information and to differentiate between credible and less useful resources. Once you have gained some experience, you will select a topic of your choice to explore more deeply through research. After gaining some expertise on your topic, you will write and publish an informational article that presents your research findings and incorporates technology, graphics, and multimedia components. 

Unit 4 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take approximately 16 hours and 45 minutes.

☐    Subunit 4.1: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 4.2: 1 hour and 15 minutes

☐    Subunit 4.3: 2 hours and 45 minutes

☐    Subunit 4.4: 4 hours

☐    Subunit 4.5: 6 hours and 45 minutes ☐    Subunit 4.5.1: 2 hours and 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 4.5.2: 1 hour and 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 4.5.3: 1 hour and 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 4.5.4: 1 hour and 15 minutes

☐    Subunit 4.6: 1 hour

Unit4 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
- Compare and contrast one author’s perspective with another author’s presentation of events. - Demonstrate strategies for improving reading comprehension of complex informational text. - Analyze the structure of a text and use this analysis to accurately summarize the main ideas of a text. - Cite evidence from informational texts to support a claim or analysis or to answer questions about a text. - Determine an author’s point of view and purpose for writing. - Integrate information presented in different texts and media to develop a deep understanding of a selected topic. - Write and publish an informational, research-based list article with graphics and multimedia features. 

Standards Addressed (Common Core): - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.9 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.1 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.4 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.7 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.9 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.10 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.4

4.1 Reading Informational Text: “The Battle of Lexington”   You will continue to work on your nonfiction reading skills by reading this excerpt from a textbook about the Battle of Lexington, which was part of the American Revolutionary War.

  • Reading: CK-12: “The Battle of Lexington” Link: CK-12: “The Battle of Lexington” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Begin a new notes page in your notebook and title it “April 19, 1775.” Begin reading this text, and be sure to stop and watch the video provided in the link in the second paragraph. After watching the video, create a subheading in your notes for the “Diary of John Barker.” Be sure to note the dates and times mentioned, and details of the events described, including the number of people involved. Then, answer the three follow-up questions below his account in 1 - 2 complete sentences per question.
     
    Next, move on to the text section and create a new subheading in your notes for “Account of the Battle of Lexington by Nathaniel Mullikan.” Again, be sure to note the source, the dates and times mentioned, and details of the events described. Then, answer the three follow-up questions below his account in 1-2 complete sentences per question.
     
    Create a third subheading for the “Battle of Lexington Engraving by Amos Doolittle.” Examine and analyze the engraving, and answer the three follow-up questions in 1 - 2 complete sentences per question. Though you aren’t reading this section, the inference and analysis skills you’ll put to use drawing information from the engraving are essential comprehension skills that you’ll use in all dimensions of your life.
     
    Make a final subheading for this reading’s notes, and title it “Terrence Blachaux Painting.” Examine and analyze thepainting, and answer the three follow-up questions in 1 - 2 complete sentences per question.
     
    Finally, answer the three “Section Questions” listed at the end of the text, using complete sentences. Be sure that you answer each question completely, in 2 - 3 sentences, and provide specific evidence from the text and visuals to support your statements.
     
    Reading this text, taking notes, and answering questions should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. It is attributed to CK-12 Foundation and the original version can be found here.

4.2 Reading Literature: “Paul Revere’s Ride”   Now that you have some background on the events that occurred during the American Revolution on the day of April 19, 1775, you will add to your knowledge by reading a different account of the happenings of that day in the classic poem “Paul Revere’s Ride.”

4.2.1 Reading Literature: “Paul Revere’s Ride”   - Reading: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s “Paul Revere’s Ride” Link: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s “Paul Revere’s Ride” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Before you begin reading, add a fifth subheading to your notes that you started taking above and title it “Paul Revere’s Ride.” Then read this poem that was written in 1860 by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, who wasn’t alive to experience the events of the American Revolutions. However, his poem includes similarities to the accounts of the events of April 19, 1775, that you read above. As you read, be sure to accurately record in your notebook the dates, people, and details of the events described in the poem.
 
Reading this text and taking notes should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/6/10)

Terms of Use: This resource is in the public domain.

4.2.2 Integrating Information and Comparing Texts   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Integrating Information and Comparing Texts” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Integrating Information and Comparing Texts” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Print a copy of the activity above, or copy the chart into you notebook. Then, review your notes and look back at the texts to complete each section of the chart with the proper information. After analyzing the information in the chart, answer the question at the bottom of the chart in 2 - 3 complete sentences. Completing this activity will help you to see how the perspective of the author influences the information provided in a text. You’ll also notice how some details are similar, while others are very different. These are important ideas to keep in mind when you begin to research for your own informational article, because you’ll see the importance of looking at multiple resources for information rather than just relying on one source.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.1](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/6/1)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/6/7)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/6/9/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/6/9/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.1b](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/1/b/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/9/)

4.3 The Research Process   The texts that you read in the previous lesson about the events of April 19, 1775, were all thoroughly researched by the authors who wrote them. Furthermore, when you completed the integrating information and text comparison activity in the previous subunit, you conducted some research by looking for information in multiple sources.
 
During the following lessons, you will learn how to move through the research process in a more independent manner. You’ll eventually use what you learn through these lessons to conduct your own research project, which you’ll use to write your own informational article. Research skills are essential not only in Language Arts, but also in Science and Social Studies classes. 

4.3.1 Preparing to Research   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Mrs. B.’s “Preparing to Research” Link: SOPHIA: Mrs. B.’s “Preparing to Research” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch the tutorial example about how to prepare yourself for the research process and note any important ideas in your notebook.
 
Watching this tutorial and thinking about how to prepare yourself to research should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/7/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).

4.3.2 Locating Multiple Resources   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Tyler Jensen’s “Finding Your Sources” Link: SOPHIA: Tyler Jensen’s “Finding Your Sources” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Create a new section in your notebook and title it “The Research Process.” Then, open this tutorial and begin by reading through all the slides in the slideshow “Finding Your Sources.” Stop to take notes on any main ideas or helpful tips, and make a list of all the possible resources where you could locate information as mentioned in this slideshow. Next, read the section on “How to Choose the Right Source,” and then view the videos “Searching Online” and “Finding Sources.” Be sure to continue taking notes on important ideas and helpful content.
 
Completing this tutorial and taking notes should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/8/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).

4.3.3 Finding Credible Resources   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Melissa Stephenson’s “How to Choose Credible Sources” Link: SOPHIA: Melissa Stephenson’s “How to Choose Credible Sources” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Create a new subheading in your notebook titled “Choosing Credible Sources.” Then, read through the slideshow that begins the tutorial and take notes on any key ideas that relate to finding and evaluating resources. Next, watch and listen to the two video tutorials “How to Choose a Credible Source” and “How to Detect a Noncredible Source.” As you watch these video lessons, continue to note any important or helpful ideas in your notebook.
 
Watching this tutorial and taking notes should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/8/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).

4.3.4 How to Begin the Research Process   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Tracyp’s “Researching” Link: SOPHIA: Tracyp’s “Researching” (HTML)
 
Instructions: View the explanation lesson that shows an example of a person thinking through how to begin the research process. Though your research topics and questions will differ from those in this lesson, it is important to think through exactly how and where to begin when it is your job to conduct research. Once you’ve viewed the lesson, open your notebook to a new page and title it “Research Plan.” Next, devise a step-by-step plan for how you’ll begin the research process, where you plan to locate resources (online, at a library, a museum, etc.), the types of resources you think you’ll use, and any other details that you think would help you get started with your research. Your research plan should include at least four different steps of action to help guide your process.
 
Watching this video and developing your own research plan should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/7/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).

4.3.5 Summarizing Research Information   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Melissa Stephenson’s “Summarizing a Source” Link: SOPHIA: Melissa Stephenson’s “Summarizing a Source” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Create a new subheading in your notebook titled “Summarizing Sources.” Then, view the video tutorial on how to effectively summarize information from resources without writing down too much information or without plagiarizing, which means copying directly from a source. As usual, be sure to record main ideas and helpful hints from the tutorial in your notebook.
 
Watching this tutorial and taking notes should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/7/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).

4.3.6 Citing Research Sources   - Explanation: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “MLA Bibliography: General Format” Link: SOPHIA: LaShanda Lawrence’s “MLA Bibliography: General Format” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Because you’ve been learning to locate and use a number of resources to find information, it is appropriate for you to learn how to give credit to the people who worked hard to create those resources. The proper way to identify resources that you gather information from is through a bibliography or works cited page. If you fail to credit other people for their work, then plagiarism (which was discussed in the previous lesson) becomes an issue. There are many different styles for citing research; in this course we will use MLA style, which is used most often in K-12 schools.
 
Create a new subheading in your notes titled “Bibliography.” Watch the video lesson, and pause the lesson at each new slide so that you can record the proper form for recording that particular resource in your notes. It may also be helpful to copy down the provided examples. You will be responsible for creating a bibliography later in this course, so taking precise and thorough notes will make your work easier in the future.
 
Watching this tutorial and taking notes should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/8/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).

4.4 Research   This unit will give you the opportunity to apply what you learned in the previous lessons as you select a topic of your choice and research it using multiple resources. 

4.4.1 Selecting a Topic   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Emma Allen’s “Picking a Research Topic” Link: SOPHIA: Emma Allen’s “Picking a Research Topic” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Create a new heading in your notebook titled “Topic Brainstorm.” Then, begin by reading over the “New Terms” and “What Interests You?” sections of this tutorial. Once you’re finished reading, write the questions “Who interests me?” and “Who do I want to learn more about?” on your paper. For the purposes of this course, you will have some choice of topic but will be limited to selecting a notable or historic figure with numerous texts written about him or her. Your person could be an inventor, a historical figure, a world leader, an activist, an athlete, a politician, or whoever interests you. Write for 5 - 10 minutes about whatever comes to your mind as answers to those questions. This is called free writing. If you come up with some good ideas in that amount of time, move on to the “What Can Background Reading Do For Me?” section, and if you haven’t, free write for as long as you need to generate some interesting topic ideas. Then watch the “Picking a Topic” video lesson to help you narrow down your ideas and select a specific topic for research. As usual, record any main ideas or helpful tips from this tutorial in your notebook.
 
After you have worked through this entire tutorial, it is time for you to make a definite decision on the topic that you’d like to research and on which you’ll eventually write an informational article. Be sure to keep in mind the tips for topic selection from this lesson and pick a topic that is interesting to you, is specific and not too general, and is one on which you’ll be able to find plenty of resources. When you write your informational article, you’ll be expected to write at least five paragraphs on this topic, so you want to be sure you’re picking a topic that has some depth. Once you have decided on your final topic, write it at the bottom of your notes page and circle it.
 
Completing the tutorial, taking notes, brainstorming, and deciding on a topic should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/7/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).

4.4.2 Conducting and Recording Research   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Research Record” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Research Record” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Now you are going to put everything you learned about how to research in the previous unit into action. You’ve selected your topic and now it is time for you to collect research information about your topic from multiple, credible resources. This is where you’ll have to do some independent work to locate resources in books, online, or by visiting places to collect information. Review your notes from all Subunits of Unit 4.3 for ideas on what types of resources to use and how to evaluate those resources for credibility. As you find and explore resources, fill in information on the “Research Record” sheet provided in this lesson. You must locate research information from at least three credible sources and summarize your findings on the handout provided before moving on to the next lesson.
 
Locating resources and completing this research activity on your topic should take approximately 3 hours.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.7](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/7/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.8](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/8/)

4.5 Writing an Informational Article   Now that you’ve gained experience with reading like a writer, making your way through the research process, and reading informational text, it is time to combine the skills associated with all of these activities and apply them as you write your own informational article about your research topic. The lessons in this unit will help you to organize your writing and will take you through the steps of the writing process, ending in a final published draft.

4.5.1 Writing the Rough Draft   4.5.1.1 Prewriting Activities   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Informational Article Prewriting Activities” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Informational Article Prewriting Activities” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Use your research record and resources to help you complete all of the activities described on the document linked above. The more effort you put into your prewriting, the easier the writing process will be for you.
 
Completing these prewriting activities should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/5/)

4.5.1.2 Informational Article Rough Draft   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Getting Started: Rough Draft” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Getting Started: Rough Draft” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Now that you have selected a topic, compiled your research, and organized your thoughts through prewriting activities, it is time to get your ideas out on paper in rough draft form. First, open the document above and read through the requirements for your completed rough draft. Review the information about writing hooks before you get started. Select the type of hook you want to write to begin your introduction paragraph.
 
Use a word processing program to compose this rough draft. Refer to the guidelines provided in this link as you write so that you include all required information in your article. Refer to your research notes and prewriting to organize your text, and compose a rough draft that is written in complete sentences and includes an introductory paragraph, at least four subheading sections and paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph. Though your rough draft isn’t expected to be perfect, it should be written to include the items on the “Getting Started: Rough Draft” handout.
 
Writing your rough draft should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2a](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/2/a/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2b](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/2/b/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2f](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/2/f/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/5/)

4.5.2 Revision   4.5.2.1 Transition Words   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Ms. K’s “Transition Words” Link: SOPHIA: Ms. K’s “Transition Words” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Create a new subheading in your notebook and title it “Transition Words.” Then, read the explanation, “What is a Transition,” and watch the video lesson that follows, “How Transitions Improve Writing.” Next, review the lists of transition words provided below the video in the tutorial. Record main ideas, helpful hints, and a brief list of some of the transition words mentioned in your notebook. After reviewing the information about transitions, look at your rough draft informational article. Go through it and identify any transition words that you used in the paper, and add transition words in sentences where it makes sense. You must include at least four transition words in your final draft of the informational article.
 
Watching the video, exploring the slideshow, and revising your writing should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2c](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/2/c/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/5/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).

4.5.2.2 Revision Strategies   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Jill Walter’s “Revising Techniques: Look and Look Again!” Link: SOPHIA: Jill Walter’s “Revising Techniques: Look and Look Again!” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read through all sections of this tutorial and revise your rough draft as you go. Begin by reading the first section and look at each of the items in blue font. For each item written in blue, look at your draft and answer the question as it applies to your rough draft. If your answer is “no” to any of the questions in the first section of the tutorial, then go back and add to your rough draft so that you improve it and can answer “yes” to those questions. Then, read the “Take Feedback and Make it Work for You” section, and go ahead and ask other people to read your rough draft and provide feedback. Use the feedback to further revise and improve your writing. Lastly, read over the remaining slides on “Revision Strategies” and “21 Steps to Essay Revisions” and use them to help you further revise and improve your draft.
 
Watching the lesson and revising your writing should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2c](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/2/c/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/5/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).

4.5.3 Revision and Editing Self Evaluation   - Checkpoint: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Informational Article Revision and Editing Checklists” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Informational Article Revision and Editing Checklists” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Use the checklist provided to finish revising and editing your personal narrative. Be sure to check each item on the list and then evaluate yourself. If you notice that something needs to be changed, removed, or added, make those revisions now. Remember that revision is all about adding information and details where more clarity is needed, and taking out unnecessary information. After completing the items on the revision part of the checklist, move to the editing section, where you will focus on correcting spelling, grammar, and conventions. Upon completion of this checklist, your writing piece should be thoroughly polished and complete. The only step you have left in the writing process is to publish it using technology and to include some extra visual and multimedia features to add an extra interesting dimension to your article.
 
Revising and editing your writing using this checklist should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/4/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/5/)

4.5.4 Publishing   4.5.4.1 Graphics and Visuals   - Explanation: SOPHIA: Tara Campbell’s “Formatting Graphics” Link: SOPHIA: Tara Campbell’s “Formatting Graphics” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Create a new subheading in your notebook and title it “Formatting Graphics.” Watch the tutorial on how to format graphics in word processing documents. Be sure to take notes that will help you to manipulate graphics in your own article. Though you may be using a different word processing program than the one used in the tutorial, most are very similar, so what you learn here will most likely apply to some degree to whatever program you do use. After watching and taking notes on the tutorial, open up your edited informational article and add at least two relevant graphics (charts/graphs/pictures/other visual) to your published article.
 
Watching this tutorial and adding graphics to your article should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2a](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/2/a/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/5/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/6/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).

4.5.4.2 Publishing and Sharing Your Article   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: “Informational Article Post” After taking your informational article through the steps of the writing process, it is now time to publish and share your piece. Once you have added graphics to your final piece, you may want to share your published work with others in the Saylor Foundation Forums or on a personal blog. You could also share it with family and friends using the share options on Google Drive or by printing it off and circulating a hard copy. Enjoy the results of your hard work in the writing process - you now have a published piece of which you should be very proud!
 
Publishing and sharing your final piece should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/6/)

4.6 Assessment   This subunit includes some assessment questions that you should complete to help you evaluate what you have learned during Unit 4. You may use your notes to help you answer these questions.