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K12ELA006: English Language Arts 6

Unit 2: The World of Childhood   In this unit, you will read the classic tale of Peter Pan, the boy with a never-ending childhood, as well as parts of Mark Twain’s memoir, Life on the Mississippi, which includes memories of his childhood growing up in a Mississippi River town. As you read, you will focus on reading like a writer. You will learn to pay close attention to how an author develops story elements, uses descriptive details, and structures plot events so that readers are engaged in the story.
 
After analyzing Peter Pan and Life on the Mississippi and challenging yourself to think like a writer, you will write a narrative of your own. You will learn the six major traits of strong writing and practice incorporating these into your own skill set. You will also review the steps of the writing process, and you will work your way through each one as you publish a personal narrative based on a memorable event from your own childhood.

Unit 2 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take approximately 16 hours and 15 minutes.

☐    Subunit 2.1: 8 hours ☐    Subunit 2.1.1: 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.1.2: 7 hours and 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.2: 1 hour and 15 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.3: 15 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.4: 5 hours and 45 minutes ☐    Subunit-wide Resources: 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.4.1: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 2.4.2: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 2.4.3: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 2.4.4: 45 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.4.5: 30 minutes

☐    Subunit 2.5: 1 hour

Unit2 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
- Demonstrate strategies for improving reading comprehension of complex fiction and informational text. - Analyze story elements (characters, point of view, setting, plot, conflict), and determine how they combine to develop universal themes. - Describe the traits of good writing. - Describe the steps of the writing process. - Write a personal narrative with a well-structured plot, developed conflict, descriptive language, and story elements.

 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):
- CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.9 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.10 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.2 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.5 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.6 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.3 - CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.2

2.1 Reading Literature: Peter Pan   You will be reading the classic novel Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie. As you read this novel about a never-ending childhood, you should read it for enjoyment. However, you should read with another purpose in mind, as well. You will be reading this text like a writer, looking at its success as a narrative, which is something you’ll begin learning how to write later in this unit.

2.1.1 Reading Like a Writer   - Reading: Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing: Mike Bunn’s “How to Read Like a Writer” Link: Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing: Mike Bunn’s “How to Read Like a Writer” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Create a new section in your notebook for this unit and title it “Reading Like a Writer.” Then, read this entire nonfiction text and annotate it - or take notes on it - in your notebook. This text will help you to understand how you should go about reading the novel, Peter Pan, which you will read as you complete this unit of the course. Our focus throughout this unit is on learning to read like a writer, and in turn, becoming a narrative writer.
 
Once you have read this text, answer the following questions in your notebook. All answers should be written in complete sentences and should begin with a restatement of the question. Each answer should be a minimum of 2 - 3 sentences in length. If you need to, look back in your notes and the article for help with your answers.

-   How is reading like a writer similar to how you usually read?
    How is it different?
-   What is a technique or strategy you noticed in this essay that
    you could try in your own writing?
-   How can you learn about the context of a text before you start
    to read it?

Reading this document and taking notes should take approximately 30
minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (Common Core):  
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/9/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under the [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). It
is attributed to Mike Bunn and the original version can be found
[here](http://writingspaces.org/sites/default/files/bunn--how-to-read.pdf).

2.1.2 Literary Analysis   - Reading: J. M. Barrie’s *Peter Pan* Link: J. M. Barrie’s Peter Pan (PDF)
 
Also available in:
MP3
 
Instructions: On the next fresh page in your notebook, begin a section devoted to your reading of Peter Pan, which you’ll be reading like a writer, as discussed in the previous section. Before you begin reading, answer the following questions in complete sentences the best that you can. Your answers to questions 1 and 2 should be at least 1 complete sentence, while your answers to questions 3 and 4 should be at least 2 - 3 complete sentences in length. If you are unable to completely answer a question now, revisit these questions and add to your answers after reading the first few chapters of the text.

-   What purpose did the author have for writing this text?
-   For what audience did the author write this text?
-   What genre is this text? How do you know?
-   Knowing that you will have to write a personal narrative of your
    own at the conclusion of this unit, what can you learn about
    writing from reading this text?

After answering these questions, begin reading *Peter Pan*. Read the
first eight chapters, and then revise and add to your answers to the
questions above. You should then move forward and complete the
remaining lessons in this section as you finish reading the rest of
the story.  
    
 Reading *Peter Pan* and answering these questions should take
approximately 6 hours.  
    
 Standards Addressed (Common Core):  
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/9/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.10](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/10/)

Terms of Use: This resource is in the public domain. It is
attributed to Project Gutenberg eBook and the original version can
be found [here](http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16/16-h/16-h.htm).

2.1.2.1 General and Immediate Setting   - Explanation: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Setting Notes” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Setting Notes” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read these notes about setting. If you cannot a print a copy of the notes, you may want to copy the main ideas into your notebook.
 
Reading this document and taking notes should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/9/)

2.1.2.2 Characterization   - Explanation: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Characterization Notes” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Characterization Notes” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read the explanation of different ways authors teach readers about characters. Be sure to record what each letter in the acronym STEAL stands for in your notes.
 
Reading this document and taking notes should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/9/)

2.1.2.3 Analyzing Characterization in Peter Pan   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Character Analysis” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Character Analysis” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Use the text of Peter Pan to locate at least six different examples of characterization in the story. Record these examples on the document or in your notes if you are unable to print the document. Be sure to record direct quotes from the story to support the inferred character traits that you identify. Refer to the examples at the top of the page for guidance.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/5/)

2.1.2.4 Comparing and Contrasting Characters   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Peter Pan − Character Comparison” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Peter Pan - Character Comparison” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Print or copy the chart from this handout into your notebook. Refer to the text of Peter Pan and think critically about similarities and differences between two of the main characters, Peter and Wendy. Complete the comparison chart using examples and quotes from the story. Refer to the examples for guidance in getting started.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/6/3/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.9](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/6/9/)

2.2 Reading Informational Text: Life on the Mississippi   Now that you’ve read a fictional narrative about Peter Pan’s endless childhood, it’s time to take a look at the more realistic account of Mark Twain’s childhood. You may have heard of Mark Twain before; he is a great American author who created the stories of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn, among others. He also wrote a memoir about his own life, Life on the Mississippi. You will be reading an excerpt of that memoir and reflect on it throughout the following lessons. 

2.2.1 Building Vocabulary: Life on the Mississippi   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Building Vocabulary: Life on the Mississippi” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Building Vocabulary: Life on the Mississippi” (PDF)
 
Instructions: This activity is designed to help you build an understanding of words that you will encounter in Life on the Mississippi, which may be new words in your vocabulary. Follow the instructions for the activity and complete it before you move on to the next lesson.
 
Completing this activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.4](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/6/4)

2.2.2 Mark Twain’s Life on the Mississippi: “Chapter 4: The Boys’ Ambition”   - Reading: Mark Twain’s Life on the Mississippi: “Chapter 4: The Boys’ Ambition” Link: Mark Twain’s Life on the Mississippi: “Chapter 4: The Boys’ Ambition” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this chapter from Mark Twain’s memoir, Life on the Mississippi. As you read, remember all that you have learned about reading like a writer, and answer the following questions in your notebook:

-   What purpose did the author have for writing this text?
-   For what audience did the author write this text?
-   What genre is this text? How do you know?
-   Knowing that you will have to write a personal narrative of your
    own at the conclusion of this unit, what can you learn about
    writing from reading this text?

This excerpt gives you an example of how Mark Twain picked one
specific childhood memory and really zoomed in on it. He wrote
specifically about the childhood dream of becoming a steamboat
captain as opposed to generally about childhood. Keep this in mind
as you begin to brainstorm topics for your own personal narrative.  
    
 Reading this chapter and answering questions should take
approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (Common Core):  
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/6/3/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/6/6/)

Terms of Use: This resource is in the public domain.

2.3 Traits of Good Writing   By this point in your academic career, you’ve had the opportunity to try your hand at writing a in a variety of formats using different writing styles. Whether you’re writing a creative story, a letter, a blog post, an article, or a discussion board forum post, the words that you write represent you. Because your writing is such a huge representation of who you are, it makes sense to work on refining and improving the quality of your writing. The following lesson gives you some tools to use in evaluating and improving upon your writing skills.

  • Explanation: Open High School of Utah: “Six + 1 Traits of Writing” Link: Open High School of Utah: “Six + 1 Traits of Writing” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read the information summarizing the traits of strong writing. In your notebook, make a list of these traits and note any important details that will help you to strengthen your writing skills in that area.
     
    Reading this document and taking notes should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

2.4 Writing a Personal Narrative   You’ve spent quite a bit of time during this unit reading a narrative and a personal account, both relating to childhood. Now it is your turn to become the author! The following lessons will help you organize your ideas and lead you through the writing process of composing your own personal narrative.

  • Reading: Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing: Catherine Ramsdell’s “Storytelling, Narration, and the Who I Am Story” Link: Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing: Catherine Ramsdell’s “Storytelling, Narration, and the ‘Who I Am Story’” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Read this chapter on personal narratives from Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing. The content in this essay will help you become familiar with exactly what a personal narrative is and what an engaging personal narrative involves. You will begin writing your own personal narrative during the next lesson, so let this reading help you begin thinking like a narrative writer. This text is full of helpful information, so jot down anything that you find especially helpful in your notebook.
     
    Reading this essay and taking notes should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Standards Addressed (Common Core):

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. It is attributed to Writing Spaces and Catherine Ramsdell and the original version can be found here.

2.4.1 Prewriting   2.4.1.1 Developing an Idea   - Activity: SOPHIA: Rebecca Oberg’s “Creative Writing” Link: SOPHIA: Rebecca Oberg’s “Creative Writing” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Watch and read the activities in this tutorial. Pay special attention to the video lesson on writing a memoir and the following notes on the writing process. Take notes on any information that you feel is important or will be helpful to your writing.
 
During this unit, you have read two very different stories that relate to childhood. Peter Pan was a story of a boy with a never-ending childhood, and Life on the Mississippi chronicled some memories from Mark Twain’s youth. Now it is your turn to write your own story about childhood!
 
The next several activities will help you to select an event from your childhood that you will write about in your personal narrative. As you begin to think of ideas, keep in mind that the best personal narratives focus on a very specific event. For example, writing about a family vacation is a general childhood memory, whereas writing about winning a sand castle contest while on that family vacation would be a more specific event.
 
Your task is to brainstorm a list of at least five possible ideas for your personal narrative. Try to make sure that your ideas meet the following criteria as this will make writing your story much more enjoyable for you:

-   The event you choose to write about should be a single, solitary
    event from your childhood.
-   This event should be something that taught you a lesson.
-   The event should have changed you in some way.

(If you’re stuck, some possible ideas could be learning to play a
game or sport, the birth of a sibling, your first day of school or
something new, an injury or illness, a traumatic experience, meeting
a hero, etc.)  
    
 Watching this tutorial, taking notes, and brainstorming ideas for
your childhood personal narrative should take approximately 30
minutes.  
    
 Standards Addressed (Common Core):  
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/5/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).

2.4.1.2 Story Elements Prewriting   2.4.1.2.1 Theme Planning   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Theme - Planning for Narrative” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Theme - Planning for Narrative” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Use the guiding questions to help you to plan and develop a lesson readers can take away from your personal narrative. This prewriting activity will help you to select and build a theme through the plot events in your story.
 
Completing this prewriting task should take approximately 15 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/5/)

2.4.1.2.2 Plot Events Planning   - Activity: SOPHIA: Karen Hamilton Silvestri’s “Elements of a Short Story” Link: SOPHIA: Karen Hamilton Silvestri’s “Elements of a Short Story” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read through the slides and watch the video lesson in the tutorial. Use this information to review the different parts of a fiction story. Then, in your notebook, open to an empty page and divide it into three sections. Label the first section “beginning,” the second section “middle,” and the third section “ending.” Now in each section, brainstorm 1 - 3 plot events that will occur in your narrative at the beginning, middle, and end of the story. You will use this plot event brainstorm as you write your first draft, so be sure to be thoughtful in your planning, as it will help the actual writing go smoothly for you.
 
Watching this tutorial and completing your plot pre-writing activity should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/5/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/3/)

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).

2.4.1.2.3 Characterization Planning   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s Characterization Planning Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Characterization Planning” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Print or copy the chart from this handout into your notebook. Then, begin brainstorming different examples of characterization that you will create as you write about your main character in your personal narrative. Be sure to focus on using strong word choice and dialogue to develop a character that is fun to read about.        
 
Completing this writing activity should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/5/)

2.4.2 Writing a Rough Draft   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Writing a Hook” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Writing a Hook” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read through the explanation on writing a lead and complete the activity described. Look for and categorize the way authors of different stories that you enjoy have chosen to begin their writing. Then, think about which type of hook you would like to create as you begin your personal narrative.
 
Once you’ve brainstormed about your hook a bit, it is time to start writing. In your notebook or on a computer, begin writing your first draft. First, craft your engaging hook using the ideas presented in the explanation above, and then continue writing the first draft of your story. Be sure to refer to your prewriting plans for plot events, characterization, and theme as you develop your story. If you are writing by hand in your notebook, skipping lines will be helpful because you’ll need room to revise and edit your work.
 
Reading Completing this writing task should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/3/)

2.4.3 Revision   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Personal Narrative Revision Checklist” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Personal Narrative Revision Checklist” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Use the revision checklist provided to revise your personal narrative. Be sure to check each item on the list and then evaluate yourself. If you notice that something needs to be changed, removed, or added to, make those revisions now. Remember that revision is all about adding information and details where more clarity is needed, and taking out unnecessary information. You don’t need to worry about correcting spelling, grammar, and conventions yet; that will come during the editing process.
 
Revising your writing using this checklist should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/5/)

2.4.4 Editing and Proofreading   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Personal Narrative Editing Checklist” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Personal Narrative Editing Checklist” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Use the editing checklist provided to proofread your personal narrative for errors. Be sure to check each item on the list and then evaluate yourself. What areas were your strengths? Which grammar and convention areas do you need to improve in? What can you do to grow in these areas?
 
Editing your writing using this checklist should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/5/)

2.4.5 Publishing   - Activity: Publishing Your Piece After taking your personal narrative through the steps of the writing process, it is now time to publish your piece. Be certain that you have thoroughly edited and proofread your writing, and then select some form of word-processing program to publish. Google Drive is a helpful, free word processing program that you may be interested in trying out. Once you have finished typing your final piece, you may want to share your published work with others in the Saylor Foundation Forums or on a personal blog. Enjoy the results of your hard work in the writing process - you now have a published piece of which you should be very proud!
 
Publishing your final piece using technology should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/6/)

2.5 Assessment   This subunit includes some assessment questions that you should complete to help you evaluate what you have learned during Unit 2. You may use your notes to help you answer these questions. 

2.5.1 Reading Comprehension   - Assessment: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Reading Literary Text and Language: Unit 2 Assessment” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Reading Literary Text and Language: Unit 2 Assessment” (HTML)
 
Instructions: This assessment was designed to test your comprehension of concepts covered in Unit 2.
 
You must be logged into your Saylor account in order to access this exam. If you do not yet have an account, you will be able to create one, free of charge, after clicking the link.
 
Completing this assessment should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/6/2/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/6/3/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/6/5/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.6.6](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RL/6/6/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RI/6/3/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.2](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/L/6/2/)

2.5.2 Writing Traits and Personal Narrative   - Assessment: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Personal Narrative Writing Traits Assessment Rubric” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Amy Kasten’s “Personal Narrative Writing Traits Assessment Rubric” (PDF)
 
Instructions: To evaluate how well you synthesized the information regarding narrative writing and traits of effective writing, use the rubric provided to assess the final draft of your narrative writing piece completed in Subunit 2.4.5. Read over the descriptions of different mastery levels in each row of the rubric and determine in which level your writing falls for each category. If your current writing piece had areas where you did not fall in the 3 - 4 range, you should revisit your narrative and revise those areas in which you showed a need for growth.
 
Completing this assessment rubric should take approximately 30 minutes.
 
Standards Addressed (Common Core):

-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.5](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/5/)
-   [CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.3](http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/W/6/3/)