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HIST313: War and American Society

Unit 1: War and the Founding of the United States   European military conflicts throughout the 18th century contributed to the formation of the United States in the 1780s.  British, French, and Spanish forces fought incessantly throughout this period and American colonists were often caught in the middle of these global conflicts.  Great Britain’s costly victory in the French and Indian War in 1763 led to higher taxes on American colonists, which generated social and political turmoil throughout the colonies.  A decade later, frustrated American colonists challenged British political rule directly and eventually secured independence from the mother country after a lengthy military struggle.  In this unit, we will examine how the French and Indian War and the American Revolution forged unique social and political values in the early United States.  We will also look at how these conflicts shaped American cultural identities and redefined the relationship between civilian and military leaders in the New Republic.  

Unit 1 Time Advisory
This unit should take you approximately 16 hours to complete. 

☐    Introduction: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 1.1: ½ hour

☐    Subunit 1.2: ½ hour

☐    Subunit 1.3: 12 hours

☐    Subunit 1.4: 2 hours

Unit1 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  • Identify how colonial military conflicts shaped the formation of the United States in the 18th century.

  • Reading: Wikibooks: U.S. History: “Road to Revolution” Link: Wikibooks: U.S. History:Road to Revolution” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Please read the entirety of the webpage to better understand the causes, conduct, and consequences of the French and Indian War in British North America.  This reading addresses subunits 1.1 through 1.2.5.
     
    Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  You can find the original Wikibooks version of this article here (HTML).

1.1 18th-Century Warfare in Colonial North America   1.1.1 Extension of European Conflicts   1.1.2 American Colonial Participation   1.1.3 Local Versus Imperial Perspectives and Policies   1.2 The French and Indian War, 1754-1763   - Lecture: C-SPAN Video Library/Tattered Cover Bookstore: Fred Anderson’s “Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War” Link: -CSPANVideo Library/Tattered Cover Bookstore: Fred Anderson’s “Crucible of War: The Seven Years' War” (Adobe Flash)
 
Instructions: Please watch the entire 35-minute debate to better understand the importance of the Seven Years War.  This lecture addresses subunits 1.2 through 1.2.5.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.2.1 Global War   1.2.2 North America Impact   1.2.3 American Participation   1.2.4 Expansion of British Imperial Influence in North American Colonies   1.2.5 Consequences for American Colonists   1.3 The American Revolution, 1776-1783   - Reading: Wikibooks: U.S. History: “American Revolution” Link: Wikibooks: U.S. History:American Revolution” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Please note that this reading addresses subunits 1.3 through 1.3.9.  Please read the entirety of the webpage to better understand the causes, conduct, and consequences of the American War for Independence.
 
Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  You can find the original Wikibooks version of this article here (HTML).

  • Lecture: The Annenberg Foundation and WGBH Boston: Eugen Weber’s “The Western Tradition”: “Lecture 37: The American Revolution” Link: The Annenberg Foundation and WGBH Boston:Eugen Weber’s “The Western Tradition”: “Lecture 37: The American Revolution” (Adobe Flash)
     
    Instructions: Please note that this lecture addresses subunits 1.3 through 1.3.9.  Please note that you must disable pop-up blockers before attempting to view the video.  Scroll down the webpage until you reach lecture 37 titled “The American Revolution.”  Click on the “VoD” icon to launch the video lecture.  Please view Professor Eugen Weber’s entire 28-minute lecture to get a sense of how the British created a society that “…tested Enlightenment ideas and resisted restrictions imposed by England.” 
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: Google Videos and vodpod's: PBS’s Liberty! The American Revolution: “The Reluctant Revolutionaries,” “Blows Must Decide,” “The Times that Try Men’s Souls,” “Oh, Fatal Ambition,” “The World Turned Upside Down,” Are We To Be A Nation?” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

    Submit Materials

  • Lecture: iTunes U: Stanford University: Jack Rakove’s “Colonial and Revolutionary America”: “Lecture 15: The Crisis of Independence” Link: iTunes U: Stanford University: Jack Rakove’s “Colonial and Revolutionary America”: “Lecture 15: The Crisis of Independence” (iTunesU)
     
    Instructions: This lecture addresses subunits 1.3 through 1.3.9.  Scroll down the webpage and click on the “View in iTunes” hyperlink for audio lecture 15 titled “The Crisis of Independence.”  Please listen to Professor Jack Rakove’s entire 50-minute lecture to better appreciate the symbiotic relationship of economic and political development in the northern colonies/states of British North America. 
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Lecture: C-SPAN Video Library: American Presidents: “Life Portrait of George Washington” Link: C-SPANVideo Library: American Presidents: Life Portrait of George Washington (Adobe Flash)
     
    Instructions: This reading addresses subunits 1.1 through 1.4.5.  Please watch the entire 2 ½ hour debate to better understand George Washington as a military commander and president.  In this video, speakers James Rees, the Executive Director of the Mount Vernon Estate and Garden, and Richard Smith, the Director of the Gerald Ford Presidential Library and Museum, provide a profile on the life and career of George Washington.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.3.1 Economic, Political, and Social Origins   1.3.2 Rebels Versus Loyalists   - Reading: Liberty Online’s version of Thomas Paine’s “The Crisis No. 1” (December 23, 1776)  Link: Liberty Online’s version of Thomas Paine’s “The Crisis No. 1” (HTML)
 
Also available in:
Google Books
 
Instructions: Please read Thomas Paine’s “The Crisis No. 1” in its entirety.  In this political pamphlet, English-born American patriot Thomas Paine argues that American colonists must overcome their fear of British military strength and unite to defeat the British.  He further asserts that no one can remain neutral in the conflict and Loyalists will be severely punished if they support British military efforts to destroy the colonial rebels.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.3.3 Civil War in the Colonies   - Lecture: iTunes U: Stanford University: Jack Rakove’s “Colonial and Revolutionary America”: “Lecture 14: The View from London” Link: iTunes U: Stanford University: Jack Rakove’s “Colonial and Revolutionary America”: “Lecture 14: The View from London” (iTunesU)
 
Instructions: This lecture addresses subunits 1.3 through 1.3.5.  Scroll down the webpage until you reach lecture 14 titled “The View from London.”  Then, click on the “View in iTunes” hyperlink to open up the podcast.  Please listen to Professor Jack Rakove’s entire 50-minute lecture to get a sense of Britain’s understanding of the events that were taking place in North America. 
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.3.4 Forging American Identities and Ideals—Remaking Colonial Society   1.3.5 Emergence of the United States   1.3.6 The Limits of Rebellion   1.3.7 Solidifying the Gains of the Revolution   1.3.8 Race, War, and Social Values   1.3.9 Professional Versus Amateur Military Forces   1.4 Rebellions in the Early Republic   1.4.1 Shays' Rebellion   - Reading: Wikipedia: “Shays’ Rebellion” Link: Wikipedia: “Shays’ Rebellion” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please read the entirety of the website in order to
get a sense of the causes and course of Shays’ Rebellion.  
    
 Terms of Use: The article above is released under a [Creative
Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License
3.0](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) (HTML).  You
can find the original Wikipedia version of this article
[here](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shays%27_Rebellion) (HTML).

1.4.2 The Whiskey Rebellion   - Reading: Wikipedia: “The Whiskey Rebellion” Link: Wikipedia: “Whiskey Rebellion” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Please read the entirety of the website in order to get a sense of the causes and course of the Whiskey Rebellion.
 
Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  You can find the original Wikipedia version of this article here (HTML).