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HIST312: Capitalism and Democracy in America

Unit 11: The "Roaring" 1920s, Great Depression and World War II   The Great Depression was a turning point in the relationship between democracy and capitalism.  The Roosevelt administration’s response to the Great Depression was a series of programs known as The New Deal that were aimed at curbing the business excesses that had characterized the 1920s and ensuring that all Americans had some basic level of social security.  Roosevelt’s successful prosecution of World War II burnished his reputation as a great president, which consequently cemented the New Deal’s place at the center of American economic and political ideology for the next quarter century.

Unit 11 Time Advisory
This unit should take you 8 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 11.1: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 11.2: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 11.3: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 11.4: 2 hours

Unit11 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  • Identify and define the term “Roaring Twenties.”
  • Identify specific critiques of American society, economics, and politics during the 1920s.
  • Identify the causes of the Great Depression.
  • Identify and define the various aspects of the New Deal and the relationship of these policies to changes in American politics and economics

11.1 The “Roaring Twenties”   - Reading: Wikibooks’ US History: “Roaring Twenties and Prohibition” Link: Wikibooks’ US History:Roaring Twenties and Prohibition” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Please read the entirety of the webpage in order to get a sense of the 1920s.
 
About the link: This online text was developed by Wikibooks as an open educational resource for use in undergraduate history courses.
 
Terms of Use: The WIkibooks article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  You can find the original version of this article here (HTML).

11.1.1 Industrial Growth   - Lecture: iTunesU: UC Berkeley, Professor J. Bradford Delong, Economics 113, Lecture 13, “Mass Production, 1910-1980” Link:  iTunesU: UC Berkeley, Professor J.  Bradford Delong, Economics 113, Lecture 13, “Mass Production, 1910-1980” (Youtube)
 
Instructions: Please listen to Professor J.  Bradford’s entire 55-minute lecture to get a sense of America’s rising industrial power in the 20th century.
 
About the link: This website hosts free lectures from the nation’s top universities in a wide array of academic subjects.
 
Terms of Use: The above video is reposted from the University of California – Berkeley.  The original version can be found here.  This video is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported License.  

11.1.2 A “Consumer’s Paradise”   - Reading: The Saylor Foundation's "A Consumer's Paradise" Link: The Saylor Foundation's "A Consumer's Paradise" (PDF)

 Instructions: Please read the linked material.

11.1.3 Criticism of the “Roaring Twenties:” The Great Gatsby   Not everyone was pleased about the economic and political changes taking place in the 1920s—some felt that the growth in consumer debt and the introduction of labor-saving devices like the automobile signaled the death of traditional American values, like hard-work and thrift.  Others deplored the rising numbers of people with self-made wealth (the “nouveau riche”).  F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsbyhas come to be viewed as the seminal literary critique of American society in the 1920s; the book’s depiction of the listless, unhappy, and criminal lives of America’s wealthy was a scathing indictment of the consequences of America’s newfound wealth.

11.1.3.1 The Great Gatsby   - Reading: Sparknotes: “The Great Gatsby” Link: Sparknotes:The Great Gatsby” (HTML)
 
Full Text available in:
eText format on the Kindle
HTML
 
Instructions: Please read the entirety of the webpage in order to get an overview of the plot and meaning of “The Great Gatsby.”  You can click on each of the links under the table of contents to move through the plot summary and analysis. You may also choose to read the work in its entirety, though this is not required for the course.
About the link: This online text was developed by Sparknotes to summarize, contextualize and analyze major literary works.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

11.2 The Great Depression   - Reading: Wikibooks’ US History: “Great Depression and New Deal” Link: Wikibooks’ US History:Great Depression and New Deal” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please read the entirety of the entry to understand
the Great Depression and New Deal.  
    
 About the link: This online text was developed by Wikibooks as an
open educational resource for use in undergraduate history
courses.  
    
 Terms of Use: The WIkibooks article above is released under a
[Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License
3.0](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) (HTML).  You
can find the original version of this article
[here](http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/US_History/Great_Depression_and_New_Deal)
(HTML).

11.3 Americans’ Changing Relationship with Federal Government   - Lecture: iTunesU: UC Berkeley, Professor J. Bradford Delong, Economics 113, Lecture 11, “The New Deal, 1933-1941”  Link:  iTunesU: UC Berkeley, Professor J.  Bradford Delong, Economics 113, Lecture 11, “The New Deal, 1933-1941” (Youtube)

 Instructions: Please listen to Professor J.  Bradford’s entire
55-minute lecture to get a sense of FDR’s various responses to the
Great Depression.  
    
 About the link: This website hosts free lectures from the nation’s
top universities in a wide array of academic subjects.  
    
 Terms of Use: The above video is reposted from the University of
California – Berkeley.  The original version can be found
[here](http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/lecture-11-the-new-deal-1933/id354823242?i=80681408). 
This video is released under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).  
  • Lecture: C-SPAN, Christina Romer, “Economic Lessons of the Great Depression” Link:  C-SPAN, Christina Romer, “Economic Lessons of the Great Depression” (Youtube)

    Instructions: Please listen to Professor Christina Romer’s entire 55-minute lecture to get a sense of lessons learned from the Great Depression.
     
    About the link: This website an entire series of lectures produced by C-SPAN.
     
    Terms of Use: The material above was produced by C-SPAN, with permission granted for non-commercial use with no modifications to the material.  The original version can be found here http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/284497-1.

11.4 World War II and “The Arsenal of Democracy”   - Reading: Wikibooks’ US History: “World War II and Rise of Atomic Age" Link: Wikibooks’ US History: World War II and Rise of Atomic Age” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Please read the entirety of the website in order to get a sense of World War II and the Atomic Age.
 
About the link: This online text was developed by Wikibooks as an open educational resource for use in undergraduate history courses.           
 
Terms of Use: The WIkibooks article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 (HTML).  You can find the original version of this article here (HTML).

  • Lecture: C-SPAN, Julian Zelizer, “Politics of National Security” Link:  C-SPAN, Julian Zelizer, “Politics of National Security” (Youtube)

    Instructions: Please listen to Professor Julian Zelizer’s entire 40-minute lecture to get a sense of the relationship between the expansion of the government during World War II, national security, and individual liberty.
     
    About the link: This website an entire series of lectures produced by C-SPAN.
     
    Terms of Use: The material above was produced by C-SPAN, with permission granted for non-commercial use with no modifications to the material.  The original version can be found here http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/291980-4.