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HIST242: Modern Northeast Asia

Unit 6: Japanese Colonial Rule in Taiwan and Korea   *Japan acquired its first colony, Taiwan, in 1895, and its second, Korea, in 1910.

In this unit, you will study both the ideology and practice of Japanese imperialism in its new territories. You will learn how and why colonial authorities adopted particular policies at particular times, and how these policies were shaped by domestic developments in the Japanese Home Islands, developments in the colonies themselves, and Japan’s wider imperialist ambitions.*

Unit 6 Time Advisory
This unit should take approximately 3.5 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 6.1: 0.5 hours

☐    Subunit 6.2: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 6.3: 1 hour

Unit6 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
- Describe how Japan administered its colonies, and how and why its policies changed over time. - Compare and contrast Japanese colonial rule in Taiwan and Korea. - Compare and contrast the response of Taiwanese and Koreans to Japanese colonial rule. - Analyze the ideology of Japanese colonialism. - Explain why this ideology may have had some appeal to other Asians.

6.1 Taiwan   6.1.1 Historical Background (Taiwan’s status)   - Reading: Reed College: H.W. Bates’ “The Island of Formosa,” 1869 Link: Reed College: H.W. Bates’ “The Island of Formosa,” 1869 (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read the description of Taiwan’s people and cultures. How does the writer compare the aborigines to Chinese settlers? Why does he think the “natural riches” of Taiwan have not yet been exploited?
 
The primary source reading and questions should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.
 
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6.1.2.1 Qing Cession of Taiwan and Taiwan’s ‘Declaration of Independence’   - Reading: Wikipedia’s “Official Declaration of Independence of the Republic of Formosa” 1895 Link: Wikipedia’s “Official Declaration of Independence of the Republic of Formosa” 1895 (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read the document on the Wikipedia page – only the text of the “Declaration” itself - and answer the following questions.
 
Why are the writers declaring Taiwanese/Formosan independence? What do you think they hoped to accomplish?
 
The primary source document and questions should take approximately 15 minutes to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the web page above.

6.1.2.2 Resistance and Suppression   6.1.3 Integration of Taiwan into Empire—‘A Civilizing Mission’   6.1.3.1 Making Modern Subjects   6.1.3.2 Education   6.1.3.3 Social ‘Modernization’ Campaigns   6.1.4 Wartime Taiwan   6.1.4.1 K?minka Policy   6.1.4.2 Taiwan’s Role in War   6.1.5 Economic Development during Colonial Period   6.2 Korea   - Lecture: Korea Society: Charles Armstrong’s “History of Korea Part II” Link: Korea Society: Charles Armstrong’s “History of Korea Part II” (HTML)

 Instructions: Listen to the podcast starting from minute 27
(discussion of colonialism) up to minute 48. The lecture provides an
overview of the period from 1910-1945. Other assigned readings will
give you more details.  
    
 How did Japan justify its annexation of Korea? What was the
attitude of other powers to Japan’s acquisition of another colony?
How did Koreans respond to the Japanese occupation?  
    
 The required portion of this lecture and questions should take
approximately 30 minutes to complete.  
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the web page above.
  • Reading: Columbia University: Asia for Educators’ Komatsu Midori’s “The Old People and the New Government” Link: Columbia University: Asia for Educators’ Komatsu Midori’s “The Old People and the New Government” (Mp3)
     
    Instructions: Please read the introduction and the longer excerpt pp2-3. Answer the questions on p3.
     
    The primary source reading and questions should take approximately 20 minutes to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the Web Pages above.

6.2.1 Annexation of Korea   6.2.1.1 Resistance—‘Righteous Army’   6.2.1.2 Suppression   6.2.2 Military Policy 1910-1919   6.2.2.1 Establishing Colonial Rule   6.2.2.2 Land Survey   6.2.2.3 March 1st Movement   - Reading: Columbia University: Asia for Educator’s “Declaration of Independence (March 1, 1919)” Link: Columbia University: Asia for Educator’s “Declaration of Independence (March 1, 1919)” (PDF)
                          
Instructions: Scroll down to the section on “Japanese Rule” and click the link to the pdf file “Primary Sources w/DBQs ‘Declaration of Independence’”
 
Read the introduction and the longer excerpt, pages 2-4 and answer the questions on page 4.
 
The primary source reading and questions should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the Web Page above.

6.2.3 Cultural Policy 1919-1931   6.2.3.1 Relaxation of Colonial Control   6.2.3.2 Emergence of Civil Society   6.2.3.3 Spread of Mass Culture (See Unit 7)   6.2.4 War Mobilization 1931-1945   6.2.4.1 K?minka – ‘Japanization’   6.2.4.2 Korea as Base of Operations   6.2.4.3 Koreans in the Japanese Military: Soldiers and ‘Comfort Women’   - Reading: Columbia University: Asia for Educators’ Primary Source Documents: “Oral Histories of the Colonial Era” and “Oral Histories of the ‘Comfort Women’” Link: Columbia University: Asia for Educators’ Primary Source Documents: “Oral Histories of the Colonial Era” (PDF) and “Oral Histories of the ‘Comfort Women’” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Please the introductions and the longer excerpts from both PDF files. Answer the questions that follow the excerpts.
 
These primary source readings and questions should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the Web Pages above.

6.2.4.4 Korean Labor in Japan   Note: This subunit is covered by the reading for subunit 6.2.4.3.

6.3 Colonialism and Development   - Reading: Japan Focus: Anne Booth’s “Did it Really Help to be a Japanese Colony? East Asian Economic Performance in Historical Perspective (1)” Link: Japan Focus: Anne Booth’s “Did it Really Help to be a Japanese Colony? East Asian Economic Performance in Historical Perspective (1)” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read the article and analyze Booth’s argument concerning what is often known as the “colonial modernity” thesis; that is, that colonization by Japan (or by another imperial power) either directly “modernized” the colony, or paved the way for its post-colonial development.
 
This reading and analysis should take approximately 1 hour to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the Web Pages above.