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HIST212: Introduction to United States History - Reconstruction to the Present

Unit 6: The Great Depression and World War II   A stock market crash that began in September of 1929 and continued through November signaled the end of the Roaring Twenties. Falling stock prices throughout the world triggered an economic panic that rippled throughout the entire U.S. economy. While only a small percentage of Americans owned stocks, commercial banks with large stock investments failed and soon pulled down other financial institutions, as investors rushed to withdraw their money from failing banks, which in turn led to further bank failures. Unemployment rates rose as worldwide consumption of manufactured goods fell and many companies laid off workers or went out of business. This stock market crash was the final devastating blow to an economy already weakened by stagnating business profits and wages. President Herbert Hoover tried to reassure the nation but refused to take drastic measures to prop up the U.S. economy and end the Great Depression. Hoover lost the 1932 presidential election to Democrat Franklin Roosevelt who promised through his “New Deal” to use every means available to put Americans back to work and end the Great Depression. 
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*In this unit, we will examine the policies and people behind Roosevelt’s New Deal, and analyze the impact that the New Deal had on the American economy and American society. We will also look at the emergence of totalitarian governments in Germany, Italy, and Japan during the Depression, and examine the origins of the Second World War. During the conflict, the U.S. engaged in a two-front war across the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, and with the development of the atomic bomb, the U.S. emerged from the conflict as the most powerful nation on the planet.

Unit 6 Time Advisory
Completing this unit should take you approximately 21.25 hours.

☐    Subunit 6.1: 4 hours

☐    Subunit 6.2: 5.5 hours

☐    Subunit 6.3: 3.25 hours

☐    Subunit 6.4: 7.5 hours

☐    Unit 6 Assessment: 1 hour 

Unit6 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • analyze the causes of the Great Depression and assess its impact on American society and the American economy;
  • identify the major reforms of the New Deal and assess their political and economic affects;
  • identify the causes of Isolationism and the eventual U.S. entry into World War II;
  • assess how World War II reshaped American society; and
  • analyze and interpret primary source documents from the twentieth century using historical research methods.

  • Reading: America.gov’s Outline of U.S. History: “Chapter 10: War, Prosperity, and Depression” and “Chapter 11: The New Deal and World War II” Links: America.gov’s Outline of U.S. History: “Chapter 10: War, Prosperity, and Depression” and “Chapter 11: The New Deal and World War II” (PDF)

    Instructions: Read the final section of Chapter 10 titled “The Great Depression” and all of Chapter 11. 
     
    Note on the Text: These chapters from America.gov’s Outline of U.S. History focuses on the origins of the Great Depression and the Roosevelt Administration’s efforts to alleviate the economic and social consequences of the Depression through the New Deal, a series of federal programs created to put Americans back to work and improve the economy. Chapter 11 also discusses America’s entry into the Second World War and the impact of the war on the United States and the broader international community.

    Reading these chapters should take approximately 40 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: The material above is available in the public domain. 

6.1 The Great Depression   - Lecture: YouTube: The Saylor Foundation’s “Origins of the Great Depression” Link: YouTube: The Saylor Foundation’s “Origins of the Great Depression (YouTube)

 Instructions: Watch this video lecture, which examines
the long-term and short-term causes of the Great Depression.  

 Watching this lecture should take approximately 20 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above. 

6.1.1 Economic and Political Origins   - Web Media: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 20: Great Depression, Lesson 59—Causes and Consequences” Presentation The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

[Submit Materials](/contribute/)
  • Reading: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “The Crash of 1929 and the Depression” Link: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “The Crash of 1929 and the Depression” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this web page. Note that it addresses the great American stock market crash of 1929 and examine how the crisis ended an era of sustained economic growth in the United States.
     
    Reading this resource should take approximately 20 minutes.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.1.2 Government Indecision   - Reading: Cato Institute: Steven Horwitz’s “Herbert Hoover, Father of the New Deal” Link: Cato Institute: Steven Horwitz’s “Herbert Hoover, Father of the New Deal” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read this article. Note that this article focuses on President Herbert Hoover’s unsuccessful efforts to deal with the Great Depression in the early 1930s. Hoover was a trained engineer with years of government experience, but he was not willing at first to use the power of the federal government to tackle the growing unemployment rate or prop up failing banks. Instead, he was more concerned with balancing the federal budget through income tax and tariff increases. Only in the final year of his term in office did he begin creating government programs to tackle the Depression, but by that point Americans had lost their faith in Hoover’s abilities.

 Reading this article should take approximately 40 minutes.  
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.1.3 The Downward Spiral   - Reading: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “The Depression and New Deal Years, 1929 -1939” Link: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “The Depression and New Deal Years, 1929 -1939” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this webpage down through the section, “The Smoot-Hawley Tariff.”

 Reading this resource should take approximately 10 minutes.  
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Learn NC’s “Herbert Hoover and the Great Depression” and “The Bonus Army” Link: Learn NC’s “Herbert Hoover and the Great Depression” and “The Bonus Army” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read both webpages. These resources address the Great Depression’s human impact. Americans across the nation lost their jobs and homes due to the Depression. Private charities and local governments tried to help homeless and hungry citizens, but they found themselves overwhelmed by the number of needy people. As economic conditions worsened, the situation threatened the very fabric of American society.

    Reading these resources should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.2 Roosevelt and the New Deal   - Lecture: YouTube: The Saylor Foundation’s “The First and Second New Deals” Link: YouTube: The Saylor Foundation’s “The First and Second New Deals (YouTube)

 Instructions: Watch this video.  

 Note on the Lecture: This multimedia presentation focuses on
President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s efforts to combat the Great
Depression through a series of economic reforms known as the First
and Second New Deals.  

 Watching this lecture should take approximately 25 minutes.

6.2.1 “Happy Days Are Here Again”: The Election of 1932   - Web Media: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 20: Great Depression, Lesson 60—The New Deal” Presentation Link: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: ** “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 20: Great Depression, Lesson 60—The New Deal” Presentation (Flash)
 
Instructions: Click on “Start Lesson” to launch the video. Watch section one (“Roosevelt Election”) of the video presentation and read the accompanying text.
 
Note on the Media: Section one of the presentation focuses on Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt’s election as president in the 1932 election. Fed up with Hoover’s inaction, many Americans turned to Roosevelt with his positive message of economic recovery and cheery campaign theme song “Happy Days Are Here Again.”

 Reading this text and watching the brief video should take
approximately 45 minutes.  
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley’s The American Presidency Project: Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “Address at the Democratic National Convention” Link: Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley’s The American Presidency Project: Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “Address at the Democratic National Convention” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Read the primary-source document on the webpage.
     
    Note on the Text: In the summer of 1932, Franklin D. Roosevelt accepted the Democratic nomination for president. In his acceptance speech, Roosevelt presents his economic plan to tackle the Great Depression and proposes a “new deal for the American people.” After reading this document, consider the following questions: In this address, what did FDR identify as the major problems facing the country? As president in his “first 100 days,” which of these problems did FDR tackle (see section 6.2.2)?

    Reading this primary-resource should take approximately 50 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: The material above is in the public domain

6.2.2 The First New Deal (1933-1935)   - Web Media: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 20: Great Depression, Lesson 60—The New Deal” Presentation Link: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 20: Great Depression, Lesson 60—The New Deal” Presentation (Flash)
 
Instructions: Click on “Start Lesson” to launch the video. Focus on section 2 of the video presentation titled “New Deal Programs” and read the accompanying text. In this section, click the accompanying text, “The Dust Bowl,” and examine the photographs and the map, which illustrate the extent of the devastation of the Dust Bowl.
 
Note on the Media: This presentation focuses on the government programs that the Roosevelt administration put into place during the New Deal. These programs were intended to alleviate the economic and social disruptions caused by the Great Depression and restore economic prosperity to the nation.

 Reading the text and watching the brief video should take
approximately 50 minutes.  
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “The Depression and New Deal Years, 1929 -1939” Link: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “The Depression and New Deal Years, 1929 -1939” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Scroll down this webpage and read the sections, “The Rise of Franklin Delano Roosevelt” and “The Hundred Days: FDR in Action.” Note that these two sections focus on the Roosevelt administration’s efforts to alleviate the major economic problems caused by the Great Depression. Between 1933 and 1935, Roosevelt and Congress devised a series of government programs to alleviate joblessness and regulate industrial competition. These programs, referred to by historians as the First New Deal, were intended to reverse the economic downward spiral that had crippled the nation.

    Reading these resources should take approximately 20 minutes. 
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

  • Web Media: Learn NC’s “The Banking Crisis” and “The Economics of Recovery and Reform” Link: Learn NC’s “The Banking Crisis” and “The Economics of Recovery and Reform” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read both webpages and listen to FDR’s “Fireside Chat” from 1933.

    Read these resources should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

  • Web Media: The Library of Congress’s Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin Migrant Worker Collection: “Voices from the Dust Bowl” Link: The Library of Congress’s Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin Migrant Worker Collection: “Voices from the Dust Bowl (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Click on the above link and then select the various links, which allow you to see photographs, read lyrics, and listen to folk songs concerning the Dust Bowl in the 1930s. After accessing these primary sources, consider the following questions: How did farmers affected by the Dust Bowl react to their circumstances? What do these sources tell us about the living conditions of those whose livelihoods were impacted by the Dust Bowl?

    Exploring this site should take approximately 20 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.           

6.2.3 The Second New Deal (1935-1937)   - Reading: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “The Depression and New Deal Years, 1929 -1939” Link: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “The Depression and New Deal Years, 1929 -1939” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Scroll down this webpage to the section titled “The Second New Deal” and read the remainder of the webpage. Note that this section of the webpage focuses on the series of social programs, which historians refer to as the Second New Deal; the Roosevelt administration and Congress passed this legislation between 1935 and 1937. These programs were intended to give workers more rights in the workplace, provide a social safety net for aged Americans, and assist various minority groups in the United States.

 Reading this webpage should take approximately 30 minutes.  
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.
  • Reading: Learn NC’s “Relief, Recovery and Reform” Link: Learn NC’s “Relief, Recovery and Reform” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this webpage and explore all of the links. This webpage focuses on the impact of New Deal reforms such as the Fair labor Standards Act.

    Reading this webpage should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

6.2.4 The New Deal’s Legacy   - Web Media: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 20: Great Depression, Lesson 60—The New Deal” Presentation Link: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 20: Great Depression, Lesson 60—The New Deal” Presentation (Flash)
 
Instructions: Click on “Start Lesson” to launch the presentation. Then, view section 3 of the video presentation titled “Critics and Challenges.” Click on the circle at the top of the webpage and read the accompanying text. 
 
Note on the Text: This presentation focuses on New Deal critics and examines why the pace of New Deal reform legislation slowed after 1938.

 Reading this resource and watching the video should take
approximatley 40 minutes.  
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.3 The Rise of Totalitarianism Abroad   - Lecture: YouTube: The Saylor Foundation’s “World War II and the United States” presentation Link: YouTube: The Saylor Foundation’s “World War II and the United States presentation (YouTube)

 Instructions: Watch this video.  

 Note on the Lecture: This multimedia presentation examines the
origins of World War II and discusses the impact of the war on the
United States.  

 Watching this lecture should take approximately 25 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

6.3.1 Domestic Responses to Foreign Militarism in the 1930s   Note: This topic is also covered by the video in subunit 6.3.

  • Web Media: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 21: World War II, Lesson 61 - The Failures of Diplomacy” presentation Link: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: ** “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 21: World War II, Lesson 61—The Failures of Diplomacy” presentation (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Click on “Start Lesson” to launch the video. Then, watch the first 3 sections of the video presentation and read the accompanying text.
     
    Note on the Media: This presentation focuses on efforts by European and American officials in the 1920s to promote world peace and prevent future wars from happening. It also examines the emergence of militaristic, anti-democratic governments in Germany, Italy, and Japan in the 1930s and the impact of these new fascist regimes on other nations of Europe and Asia.

    Reading this resource and watching the video should take approximately 1 hour.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.3.2 American Isolationism and the Pending Global Conflict   Note: This topic is also covered by the video in subunit 6.3.

  • Web Media: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 21: World War II, Lesson 61—The Failures of Diplomacy” presentation Link: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 21: World War II, Lesson 61—The Failures of Diplomacy” presentation (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Click on “Start Lesson” to launch the presentation. Watch the fourth section of the video presentation titled “American Isolationism” and read the accompanying text.
     
    Note on the Media: This presentation focuses on American social and political efforts to remain isolated from the growing political turmoil in Europe in the mid-1930s.

    Reading this resource and watching the video should take 20 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: The Public Broadcasting Service and WGBH Boston’s The American Experience: Lindbergh: Charles Lindbergh’s “Address to the America First Committee” Link: The Public Broadcasting Service and WGBH Boston’s The American Experience: Lindbergh: ** Charles Lindbergh’s “Address to the America First Committee” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Read this primary-source document.
     
    Note on the Text: In this April 1941 speech, famed American aviator Charles Lindbergh argues that the best course of action for the United States is to remain isolated from the building war in Europe. He asserts that America should focus on defending itself from foreign attacks and should not join the war for the benefit of other nations, such as Great Britain and France. After reading this document, consider the following questions: What arguments did Lindbergh employ against intervention in the war in Europe as an ally of Great Britain? What events led Lindbergh to conclude that Great Britain was losing the war? In this address, what historical events did Lindbergh fail to anticipate that would enable the United States to invade Continental Europe successfully during World War II?

    Reading this resource should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: The material above is available in the public domain.

6.4 A Two-Front War   6.4.1 America Enters the Global Conflict   Note: This topic is also covered by the video in subunit 6.3.

  • Web Media: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 21: World War II, Lesson 62—The Second World War” Presentation Link: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 21: World War II, Lesson 62—The Second World War” Presentation (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Click on “Start Lesson” to launch the video presentation. Watch all 4 sections of the video presentation, and read the accompanying text.
     
    Note on the Media: This presentation focuses on the outbreak of war in Europe and Asia at the end of the 1930s and the events that led the United States into the global conflict at the end of 1941.

    Reading the text and watching the video should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

6.4.2 The Home Front   - Web Media: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 21: World War II, Lesson 63 - The Home Front” presentation Link: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: ** “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 21: World War II, Lesson 63—The Home Front” presentation (Flash)
 
Instructions: Click on the “Start Lesson” button to launch the presentation. Watch all four sections of the video presentation, and read the accompanying text. In the fourth section (“Japanese Internment”), click on the accompanying text, “Japanese Internment,” and participate in the virtual discussion.
 
Note on the Media: This presentation focuses on American mobilization for war and examines how the war affected many different segments of the American population including women, African-Americans, and other ethnic minorities.

 Reading the text and watching the video should take approximately 1
hour and 15 minutes.  
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “The United States in World War II” Link: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “The United States in World War II” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read the section titled “World War Two: The Home Front” down through the section “Science and World War II.” Note that this webpage focuses on American efforts to convert peacetime industry to war production, shape public opinion regarding the conflict, and deal with the Japanese American population during the war years.

    Reading this webpage should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

  • Reading: HistoryLink.org: James R. Warren’s “World War II Home Front on Puget Sound” Link: HistoryLink.org: James R. Warren’s “World War II Home Front on Puget Sound” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this article, which focuses on the impact of World War II in Washington State. The effects of this war on this part of the country were widespread over much of the nation, but to the West Coast in particular.

    Reading this resource should take approximately 30 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

  • Web Media: YouTube: United States Government’s “Japanese-American Internment” Link: YouTube: United States Government’s “Japanese-American Internment” (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Watch this video.
     
    Note on the Media: This 1942 U.S. government propaganda film attempts to justify the detention and internment of over 100,000 Japanese-Americans living on the West Coast of the United States. The film depicts Japanese-Americans as a potential wartime threat and asserts that the government acted in the best interests of all Americans by interning these American citizens. After watching this film, consider the following questions: According to the film, what factors justified the forced relocation of Japanese Americans from the west coast to the interior? What aspects of this relocation did the film neglect to mention or pass over?

    Watching this video should take approximately 10 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: The material above is available in the public domain

6.4.3 The War Abroad   Note: This topic is also covered by the video in subunit 6.3.

  • Web Media: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 21: World War II, Lesson 64—Wartime Diplomacy” Presentation Link: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 21: World War II, Lesson 64—Wartime Diplomacy” Presentation (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Click on “Start Lesson” to launch the video. Watch the first 3 sections of the video presentation, and read the accompanying text. 
     
    Note on the Media: This presentation focuses on the international military alliance that the United States joined to fight Nazi Germany and imperial Japan during the Second World War. It discusses wartime diplomacy and how agreements between the U.S., Great Britain, and Russia shaped the war and its outcome.

    Reading this text and watching the video should take approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “Important Battles of World War II: the Pacific Theater” Link: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “Important Battles of World War II: the Pacific Theater” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this webpage.

    Reading this resource should take approximately 45 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

  • Reading: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “Important Battles of World War II: the European Theater” Link: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “Important Battles of World War II: the European Theater” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this webpage.

    Reading this resource should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

  • Reading: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “The United States in World War II (continued)” Link: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “The United States in World War II (continued)” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read this webpage through the section titled “Hiroshima – The Atomic Age Arrives.” 

    Note that the three webpages above focus on American military actions during World War II. They address the fighting in the European and Pacific Theaters. They also address the use of atomic weapons in Japan and the Holocaust.

    Reading this webpage should take approximately 15 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.
     

6.4.4 Forging a New World Order   - Lecture: YouTube: The Saylor Foundation’s “The U.S. and the Postwar World” presentation Link: YouTube: The Saylor Foundation’s “The U.S. and the Postwar World presentation (YouTube)

 Instructions: Watch this video.  

 Note on the Lecture: This multimedia presentation discusses the
domestic and international consequences of World War II.  

 Watching this video should take approximately 25 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Web Media: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 21: World War II, Lesson 64—Wartime Diplomacy” presentation Link: University of California College Prep’s US History Course: “Unit 8: The U.S. at War, Chapter 21: World War II, Lesson 64—Wartime Diplomacy” presentation (Flash)
     
    Instructions: Click on “Start Lesson” to launch the video. Watch part 4 of the video presentation titled “The Aftermath of World War II” and read the accompanying text.
     
    Note on the Media: This presentation focuses on the outcome of the Second World War. It addresses the postwar goals of the allied nations and examines how a growing rift developed between the United States and the Soviet Union following the end of the conflict.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “The United States in World War II” Link: Sage American History: Henry J. Sage’s “The United States in World War II” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Read the summary and legacy sections of this webpage, which discusses the creation and purpose of the United Nations and the historic legacy of World War II.

    Reading this resource should take approximately 10 minutes.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

Unit 6 Assessment   - Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “The Great Depression and World War II” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “The Great Depression and World War II (PDF)

 Instructions: Complete this written assessment. When you are
finished, check your work against this [“Guide to
Responding](http://www.saylor.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/HIST212-Guide-to-Responding-Unit-6.FINAL_.pdf)[”](http://www.saylor.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/HIST212-Guide-to-Responding-Unit-6.FINAL_.pdf)
(PDF).  

 Completing this assessment should take approximately 1 hour.