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ENGL406: James Joyce

Unit 4: Ulysses   Chronicling the events of a single day in the lives of two characters, Stephen Dedalus and Leopold Bloom, Joyce’s expansive, densely allusive, and narratologically-innovative Ulyssesremains one of the most important, complex, and challenging works in literary history.  As in the unit on A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, we will begin our study of the masterpiece by moving through the novel from beginning to end, episode-by-episode, addressing major developments and themes as they arise in the text.  We will then take a step back, discussing stylistic and aesthetic decisions, and finally take an in-depth look at some of its principle themes and concepts.

Unit 4 Time Advisory
This unit should take you 36 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 4.1: 18 hours

☐    Subunit 4.2: 9 hours

☐    Subunit 4.3: 9 hours

Unit4 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  • Identify the ways in which Ulysses format borrows from the themes, structure, and history of Homer’s Odyssey.
  • Explain and justify or critique the critical assessments of Ulysses as the national Irish literary epic.
  • Trace the development of Joyce’s style across his oeuvre, from more traditional narratives to experimental forms.
  • Outline the treatment of the Jewish characters in Ulysses.
  • Compare the characters of Leopold and Stephen.
  • Describe the significance of the unorthodox punctuation, syntax, and repetitions in the novel.

  • Reading: Project Gutenberg’s version of James Joyce’s Ulysses The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

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4.1 The Progression of the Novel   - Reading: Stockton College’s “The Linati Schema” and Cornell University’s James Joyce Collection: “Writing and Publishing Ulysses” and “Selling Ulysses” Link: Stockton College’s “The Linati Schema”(HTML) and Cornell University’s James Joyce Collection “Writing and Publishing Ulysses (HTML)and “Selling Ulysses” (HTML)
 
Instructions: First read the essay titled “The Linati Schema,” which details Joyce’s letter to his friend Carlo Linati.  The schema will provide you with a useful lens through which to view individual chapters.  From Cornell’s James Joyce Collection, please read the entirety of both short essays for a discussion of the history of the text.
 
Note on the text: Ulysses is arranged into 18 different episodes; in a 1921 letter to Carlo Linati, Joyce associated each episode with an element or figure from Homer’s The Odyssey.  This schema has become the standard method for identifying each of the episodes, and we will use it here.
 
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4.1.1 Telemachus, Nestor, and Proteus: Death of the Mother; Images of Death and Drowning   - Reading: RTE Reading Ulysses’s “Telemachus”; “Nestor”; “Proteus” Link: RTE Reading Ulysses’s “Telemachus”; (HTML) “Nestor”; (HTML)  “Proteus”(HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the sections linked here for a basic review of the important themes in these episodes.  They should help you work through the text.
 
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4.1.2 Calypso, Lotus Eaters, and Hades: An Introduction to Leopold Bloom, His Voice, and His Molly; The Funeral and Bloom’s Understanding of Death   - Reading: RTE Reading Ulysses’s “Calypso”; “Lotus Eaters”; “Hades” Link: RTE Reading Ulysses’s “Calypso”; (HTML) “Lotus Eaters”; (HTML) “Hades” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the sections linked here for a basic review of the important themes in these episodes.
 
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4.1.3 Aeolus, Lestrygonians, Scylla and Charybdis: The Bric a Brac of Life Breaking into the Narrative; Images of Ingestion and Digestion; Relations between Stephen and Bloom   - Reading: RTE Reading Ulysses’s “Aeolus”; “Lestrygonians”; “Scylla and Charybdis” Link: RTE Reading Ulysses’s “Aeolus”; (HTML) “Lestrygonians”; (HTML) “Scylla and Charybdis”    (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the sections linked here for a basic review of the important themes in these episodes.
 
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4.1.4 Wandering Rocks, Sirens, Cyclops, Nausicaa, Oxen of the Sun: Musicality; the Worlds of Women and Men; Experiments with Narrative Style and Voice   - Reading: RTE Reading Ulysses’s “The Wandering Rocks”; “Sirens”; “Cyclops”; “Nausicaa”; “Oxen of the Sun”; James Joyce Music’s “Music in Ulysses” Link: RTE Reading Ulysses’s “The Wandering Rocks”; (HTML)   “Sirens”; (HTML) "Cyclops"; (HTML)  “Nausicaa”; (HTML)   “Oxen of the Sun”; (HTML)  James Joyce Music’s "Music in Ulysses" (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the sections linked here for a basic review of the important themes in these episodes.  Also, please look over the short essay on Joyce’s music for more about the sounds in the novel.
 
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4.1.5 Circe: Visions and Hallucinations; the Concept of Time   - Reading: RTE Reading Ulysses’s “Circe” Link: RTE Reading Ulysses’s “Circe” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the sections linked here for a basic review of the important themes in these episodes.  Many consider this episode the most challenging; take your time with it.
 
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4.1.6 Eumaeus, Ithaca, and Penelope: Excess of Narrative and Text; “Where?”--Questions of Place; Molly’s Monologue, Femininity, and Gender Relations   4.2 Style and Form   4.2.1 Intense Stream of Consciousness   - Reading: Yale University’s The Modernism Lab: “James Joyce’s Method—Regarding the Stream of Consciousness” Link: Yale University’s The Modernism Lab: “James Joyce’s Method—Regarding the Stream of Consciousness” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read the short introduction to the novel, which discusses Joyce’s technique of stream of conscious narration.
 
Terms of Use: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License (HTML).  The original Yale University version of this piece can be found here (HTML).

4.2.2 Split Narrative: The Voices of Stephen Dedalus, Leopold Bloom, and Molly   - Reading: Yale University’s The Modernism Lab: “Ulysses, Order and Myth” Link: Yale University’s The Modernism Lab: Ulysses, Order and Myth” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read the brief essay here for more about the multiplicity of voices in the text.
 
Terms of Use: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License (HTML).  The original Yale University version of this piece can be found here (HTML).

4.2.3 The Interjection of the Outside World: Newspaper Headlines, Street Ads, and the Sounds of City Life   - Reading: Michael Murphy’s “The Rhetorics of Fiction and Politics in the Aeolup Episode of James Joyce’s Ulysses” Link: Michael Murphy’s "The Rhetorics of Fiction and Politics in the Aeolus Episode of James Joyce's Ulysses" (PDF)

 Instructions: Please read this essay, which discusses the narrative
function of the intrusion of various voices and sounds into the
novel’s main narrative.  The article also offers an excellent
discussion of the presence of journalistic anecdotes in the text.
 Please note that to access the essay, you must follow the link with
the article’s title.  
    
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displayed on the webpage above.

4.2.4 Puns, Wordplay, and More   - Reading: Hypermedia Joyce Studies: Sam Slote’s “A Eumaean Return to Style” Link: Hypermedia Joyce Studies: Sam Slote’s “A Eumaean Return to Style”(HTML)
   
Instructions: Please read this critical essay for a discussion of language, style, and wordplay in the novel.
 
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4.2.5 Repetitions and Intratextual Gestures   - Reading: University of California Press E-Books Collection: Maria Tymoczko’s The Irish Ulysses: “Genre Echoes From Early Irish Literature” Link: University of California Press E-Books Collection: Maria Tymoczko’s The Irish Ulysses: “Genre Echoes From Early Irish Literature” (HTML)
 
Also available in:
 
Google Books
 
Instructions: Read the chapter linked here, which offers a critical analysis of the repetitions and narrative strategy in the novel, as well as thoughts on its abundance of intertextual references.  
 
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  • Web Media: University College Dublin: Ann Fogarty’s “James Joyce and Popular Culture” Link: University College Dublin: Anne Fogarty’s "James Joyce and Popular Culture"

     
    Also available in:

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    MP3
     
    Transcript (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Please listen to this discussion for a critical analysis of the effect of intertextuality in the novel.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of University College Dublin, and can be viewed in its original form here.  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder. 

4.2.6 Approaches to the Episodic Structure   - Reading: Yale University’s The Modernism Lab: Dr. Pericles Lewis’s Cambridge Introduction to Modernism: “Ulysses” Link: Yale University’s The Modernism Lab: Dr. Pericles Lewis’s Cambridge Introduction to Modernism: "Ulysses" (PDF)
 
Instructions: Please read this short excerpt from the Cambridge Introduction to Modernism, which offers a brief analysis of the episodic structure of the text.
 
Terms of Use: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License (HTML).  The original Yale University version of this work can be found here (HTML).

4.2.7 Punctuation and Syntax   - Reading: Robot Wisdom: Jorn Barger’s “James Joyce’s Punctuation in Ulysses” Link: Robot Wisdom: Jorn Barger’s "James Joyce's Punctuation in Ulysses"(PDF)
 
Instructions: Please read this short piece on Joyce’s use of language in the novel.
 
Terms of Use: Jorn Barger has licensed his content under an Open Web Content License (HTML). 

4.2.8 Beginnings and Endings: Thoughts on Where We Start and Finish in the Novel   - Reading: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: “Ulysses: The Form and Subordinate Structures” Link: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: Ulysses: The Form and Subordinate Structures”(HTML)
 
Also available in:
 
Google Books
   
Instructions: From the chapter on Ulysses, please read the section titled “Technics” found on pages 164-171.
 
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4.3 Major Themes and Concepts   4.3.1 Relationship to Homer’s The Odyssey: Parallels and Discrepancies in Characterization, Mode, and Sequence   - Reading: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: “Ulysses: The Form and Subordinate Structures” Link: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: Ulysses: The Form and Subordinate Structures”
 
Also available in:
 
Google Books
 
Instructions: From the chapter on Ulysses, please read the section titled “The Odyssean Scheme,” which is on pages 123-142.  The section discusses the presence and function of Homeric parallels in the text.
 
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  • Web Media: LibriVox’s “James Joyce in Context” Link: LibriVox’s “James Joyce in Context”(HTML and Mp3)
     
    Instructions: Please look over the site linked here, which includes a list of all of Ulysses’ references to other popular texts.  You may want to listen to some of the audio files, which include readings from the texts used in the novel.
     
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4.3.2 Mothers, Fathers, and Sons: The Function and Disfunction of Familial Relationships   4.3.3 Concepts of Time   - Reading: Hypermedia Joyce Studies: Alexandra Anyfanti’s "Time, Space, and Consciousness in James Joyce's Ulysses" Link: Hypermedia Joyce Studies: Alexandra Anyfanti’s "Time, Space, and Consciousness in James Joyce's Ulysses" (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read this short piece on the irregularity of time in the novel.
 
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4.3.4 The Figuration of Jewish Identity, Anti-Semitism, and Leopold Bloom   - Reading: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Frank Budgen’s James Joyce and the Making of Ulysses, and Other Writings: “Chapter Thirteen” Link: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Frank Budgen’s James Joyce and the Making of Ulysses, and Other Writings: “Chapter Thirteen”(HTML)
 
Instructions: From the critical study linked here, please read the entirety of Chapter Thirteen.  The chapter reflects on the construction of Bloom’s character, which becomes inextricably linked with his Jewish identity.
 
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4.3.5 Stephen and Bloom: Relationships and Parallels   - Reading: Link: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Frank Budgen’s James Joyce and the Making of Ulysses, and Other Writings: “Chapter Four” Link: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Frank Budgen’s James Joyce and the Making of Ulysses, and Other Writings: “Chapter Four”(HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the chapter linked here for a discussion of the relationship between Leopold and Stephen, who are constructed through their oppositional characteristics.
 
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4.3.6 Marriage, Marital Strife, and Jealousy   - Web Media: University College Dublin: Declan Kiberd’s “Ulysses and Us: The Art of Everyday Life” Link: University College Dublin: Declan Kiberd’s “Ulysses and Us: The Art of Everyday Life

    
 Also available in:  


[iTunes](http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/scholarcast-13-ulysses-us/id276290640?i=55485917)  
    
 [Mp3](http://www.ucd.ie/scholarcast/audio/scholarcast13.mp3)  
    
 [Transcript
(PDF)](http://www.ucd.ie/scholarcast/scholarcast13.html)  
    
 Instructions: Please listen to this discussion of sexual relations
and jealousy in the text.  
    
 Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the
kind permission of University College Dublin, and can be viewed in
its original form
[here](http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/scholarcast-13-ulysses-us/id276290640?i=55485917). 
Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be
reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the
copyright holder. 

4.3.7 The Irish Voice and Irish Identity   - Reading: University of California Press E-Books Collection: Maria Tymoczko’s The Irish Ulysses: “Irish Nationalism and Ulysses as Epic” Link: University of California Press E-Books Collection: Maria Tymoczko’s The Irish Ulysses: “Irish Nationalism and Ulysses as Epic”(HTML)
 
Also available in:
 
Google Books
 
Instructions: From The Irish Ulysses, please read the entire chapter linked here.
 
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