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ENGL406: James Joyce

Unit 3: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man   In this unit, we will explore Joyce’s first novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, a künstlerroman (or narrative following the development of an artist) that remains one of the most widely-acclaimed works of the 20thcentury.  The introductory section has been designed to draw us through the entirety of the novel, thinking critically about its structure as a narrative of Stephen’s development and the various stages through which he progresses.  We will then turn to matters of style and form, paying special attention to his innovative use of stream-of-consciousness narration. We will conclude with an analytical section devoted to the figure of Stephen Dedalus and the various roles and conventions he fills.

Unit 3 Time Advisory
This unit should take you 36 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 3.1: 12 hours

☐    Subunit 3.2: 12 hours

☐    Subunit 3.3: 12 hours

Unit3 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  • Explain the correlation between the language and Stephen’s own state in life in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.
  • Situate A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man within the bildungsroman and kunstlerromantraditions.
  • Describe the treatment of religion and spirituality in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.
  • Trace the development of the hero’s evolving consciousness from boyhood to adulthood in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.
  • Cite specific examples of “stream of consciousness” style in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.
  • Describe the conflict between Stephen’s aesthetic principles and personal relationships in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.
  • Identify and explain significant examples of epic convention in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.

  • Reading: Project Gutenberg’s version of James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Link: Project Gutenberg’s version of James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (HTML)
     
    Also available in:
    Google Books
     
    EPub

    Instructions: Please read the entire text of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.1 The Structure of the Novel: The Maturation of an Artistic Sensibility   3.1.1 Childhood and Intellectual Growth   - Reading: Yale University’s The Modernism Lab: Dr. Pericles Lewis’s Cambridge Introduction to Modernism: “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” Link: Yale University’s The Modernism Lab: Dr. Pericles Lewis’s Cambridge Introduction to Modernism: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (PDF)

 Instructions: Please read this short excerpt from the *Cambridge
Introduction to Modernism*.  The section linked here provides a
brief analysis of the ways in which Joyce represents his hero’s
developing consciousness.  
    
 Terms of Use: This work is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/)
(HTML).  The original Yale University version of this piece can be
found
[here](http://modernism.research.yale.edu/wiki/index.php/A_Portrait_of_the_Artist_as_a_Young_Man)
(HTML).

3.1.2 Sexual Awakening   - Reading: The Modern Word: Sylvie Hill’s “His Cheeks Were Aflame: Masturbation, Sexual Frustration and Artistic Failure in Joyce’s Portrait of Stephen Dedalus” Link: The Modern Word: Sylvie Hill’s "His Cheeks Were Aflame: Masturbation, Sexual Frustration and Artistic Failure in Joyce's Portrait of Stephen Dedalus" (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the short piece for an analysis of Stephen’s sexual awakening in the novel.
 
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3.1.3 Spiritual Crisis   - Reading: CBS’s Find Articles: Theology Today: Ellen T. Charry’s “Spiritual Formation by the Doctrine of the Trinity” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

[Submit Materials](/contribute/)

3.1.4 Epiphany and Artistic Awakening   - Reading: The Modern Word: Randy Hofbauer’s “The Tool of the Martyr: A Study of Epiphany in James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” Link: The Modern Word: Randy Hofbauer’s “The Tool of the Martyr: A Study of Epiphany in James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man  (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the short article on epiphanies in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.
 
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3.1.5 Artist as Priest: The Vocational Mission   - Reading: Ohio State University’s Knowledge Bank: Lindsey Tucker’s “Stephen and Bloom at Life’s Feast” Link: Ohio State University’s Knowledge Bank: Lindsey Tucker’s “Stephen and Bloom at Life’s Feast” (PDF)
 
Instructions: To access this document, you will need to scroll down to the box that reads “Files in This Item” and click on the PDF link.  From the section titled “Stephen,” please read the subsection titled “Alimentary Imagery in A Portrait,” which is on pages 11-27.  Pay close attention to the discussion of the relationship between the artist and priest in the essay.
 
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3.1.6 Artist in Exile   - Reading: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: “Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” Link: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (HTML)
 
Also available in:
 
Google Books
 
Instructions: Please read the section titled “Stephen Hero” on pages 56-62 for a discussion of the function of the “exile” theme in the novel, especially in relationship to the maturation process.
 
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3.2 Matters of Style and Form   3.2.1 Intense Stream of Consciousness Narration   - Reading: University of Madrid: Cristina Flores Moreno’s “Romantic Irony: The Bridge Between the Romantic and the Modernist Artist in Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” Link: University of Madrid: Cristina Flores Moreno’s “Romantic Irony: The Bridge Between the Romantic and the Modernist Artist in Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man”(PDF)
 
Instructions: Please read the section titled “Joyce’s Literary Career and Romantic Irony,” which is on pages 212-216 of the article.  As you read, please focus on the discussion of Joyce’s stream-of-conscious narration.
 
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3.2.2 Beginnings and Endings: “Once upon a time and a good time it was” to “Stand me now and ever in good stead”   - Lecture: iTunesU: University of Warwick: Dr. Jeremy Treglowen’s “James Joyce, Portrait of the Artist” Link: University of Warwick: Dr. Jeremy Treglowen’s “James Joyce, Portrait of the Artist” (iTunes U)
 
Instructions: Please listen to the entire lecture for a continued discussion of the novel’s style.  The lecture spends a significant amount of time discussing the first lines of the book.  Pay close attention to this analysis.
 
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3.2.3 The Evolution of Style and Language throughout the Novel   - Reading: University of Madrid: Cristina Flores Moreno’s “Romantic Irony: The Bridge Between the Romantic and the Modernist Artist in Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” Link: University of Madrid: Cristina Flores Moreno’s “Romantic Irony: The Bridge Between the Romantic and the Modernist Artist in Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man”(PDF)
 
Instructions: Please read the section titled “Stephen’s Trajectory from Romanticism to Modernism,” which can be found on pages 203-209.  The section examines the shifts in language that occur as Stephen matures over the course of the novel.
 
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3.2.4 Verbal Art: The Sights and Sounds of Urban Ireland   - Reading: James Joyce Music’s “Music in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” Link: James Joyce Music’s “Music in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the short entry linked here for more about the musical motif in the novel, especially Stephen’s constant awareness of the sounds around him.
 
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3.2.5 Epic Conventions in the Novel   - Reading: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Robert Scholes’s, ed. The Workshop of Dedalus: “The Paris Notebook” Link: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center:
Robert Scholes’s, ed. The Workshop of Dedalus: “The Paris Notebook” (HTML)
 
Instructions: From Scholes’s The Workshop of Dedalus, read the short section linked here for more about Joyce’s concept of the “epical” in his novel.
 
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3.2.6 Stephen’s Journal Entries and the Concluding Narrative Shift   - Reading: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: “Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” Link: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (HTML)
 
Also available in:
 
Google Books (Citizen and the Artist)
 
Instructions: From Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist, please read the section titled “Claritas” on pages 95-109 from the chapter linked here.  The section specifically discusses the function of Stephen’s journal, as well impressions of the novel’s conclusion.
 
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3.2.7 Repetition, Poetic Language, and Lyricality   - Reading: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: “Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” Link: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (HTML)
 
Also available in:
 
Google Books
 
Instructions: Please read the section titled “Consonantia” on pages 85-95.  This particular section discusses the function of repetitive language throughout the text, suggesting that this technique establishes a sense of permanence that counters Stephen’s maturation.  The section also provides some additional information on the musical and lyrical language in the text.
 
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3.2.8 Novel as Künstlerroman and Bildungsroman: Elements of Convention   - Reading: University of Tennessee at Martin: Dr. Lynn Alexander’s “James Joyce, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” Link: University of Tennessee at Martin: Dr. Lynn Alexander’s “James Joyce, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the part of the site titled “Background” to learn about the terms bildungsroman and kunstlerroman and their application to A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.
 
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3.3 Portraits of Stephen   3.3.1 Stephen as Son and Family Member   - Reading: London School of Journalism: Ian Mackean’s “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” Link: London School of Journalism: Ian Mackean’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man(HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read chapter one for a discussion of Stephen’s relationship with his family, as well as his rejection of parental authority.
 
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3.3.2 Stephen as Irishman   - Reading: CBS’s Find Articles: Twentieth Century Literature: Tracy Schwarze’s “Silencing Stephen: Colonial Pathologies in Victorian Dublin” Link: CBS’s Find Articles: Twentieth Century Literature: Tracey Schwarze’s “Silencing Stephen: Colonial Pathologies in Victorian Dublin”(HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this short piece on Stephen’s attachment to Irish nationalist causes in the novel.
 
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3.3.3 Stephen as Artist   - Reading: University of Tennessee at Martin: Dr. Lynn Alexander’s “Stephen’s Aesthetic Theories” Link: University of Tennessee at Martin: Dr. Lynn Alexander’s “Stephen’s Aesthetic Theories” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please look over the notes linked here for more about Stephen’s role as an artist in the novel.
 
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3.3.4 Stephen as Friend   - Reading: London School of Journalism: Ian Mackean’s “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” Link: London School of Journalism: Ian Mackean’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man(HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read chapter five for a discussion of Stephen’s relationship with his friends, especially Joyce’s construction of his friends as characters.
 
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3.3.5 Stephen as Romantic Hero   - Reading: University of Madrid: Cristina Flores Moreno’s “Romantic Irony: The Bridge Between the Romantic and the Modernist Artist in Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” Link: University of Madrid: Cristina Flores Moreno’s “Romantic Irony: The Bridge Between the Romantic and the Modernist Artist in Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man”(PDF)
 
Instructions: Read the section titled “Some Considerations on the Nature of Irony in A Portrait,” which is on pages 209-212.  This particular section of the articles discusses, among other issues relevant to your study, the idea of Stephen as the hero of a romantic novel.
 
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3.3.6 Stephen as Mythical Character   - Reading: University of Florida: Dr. R. Brandon Kershner’s “Joycean Pioneers” Link: University of Florida: Dr. R. Brandon Kershner’s “Joycean Pioneers”(HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the short piece linked here for some information on critical reactions to A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man’s origins in myth.
 
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3.3.7 Stephen as Catholic and Theologian   - Reading: London School of Journalism: Ian Mackean’s “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” Link: London School of Journalism: Ian Mackean’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man(HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the entirety of chapter three, which discusses Stephen’s rejection of his religion and theology.
 
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