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ENGL406: James Joyce

Unit 2: Short Fiction   James Joyce described Dublin as a city of paralysis, and many of his short stories in The Dublinersdeal with this concept, featuring figures trapped by their decisions or unable to find the resources to escape.  We will examine these tropes carefully, tying them to what we know about his life and times while relating them to his stylistic and structural decisions.

First, however, we will begin with a study of Joyce’s Dublin, which he once termed “the universal city of my work.”  How does Joyce present the metropolis, and how does he negotiate the complex relations between place and identity?  We will then take a look at Joyce’s craft, thinking critically about his signature techniques and stylistic maneuvers, before examining Joyce’s presentation of characters and their relationships.  We will devote the last section to his most celebrated short story “The Dead,” which proves somewhat atypical of the collection.

Unit 2 Time Advisory
This unit should take you 18 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 2.1: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 2.2: 6 hours

☐    Subunit 2.3: 6 hours

☐    Subunit 2.4: 3 hours

Unit2 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  • Explain the influence that Dublin had on Joyce’s literary career and oeuvre.
  • Identify significant examples of paralysis within multiple stories in The Dubliners.
  • Identify the characteristics of Joyce’s early writing style.
  • Define the term “epiphany” as it relates to Joyce’s fiction.
  • Explain the significance of the snow in “The Dead.”
  • Cite examples of the treatment of social problems, such as class, in The Dubliners.

  • Reading: Project Gutenberg’s version of James Joyce’s The Dubliners Link: Project Gutenberg’s version of James Joyce’s The Dubliners (HTML)
     
    Also available in:
    EPub

    Note: This website offers the book for download in 20 different formats.  Use the drop-down menu on the right side of the page to choose the most convenient format.

    Instructions: Please read the entire collection of stories and then work through the subunits below, which will trace specific themes present throughout the work.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.1 “Dear Dirty Dublin”: Views of the Irish Capital   2.1.1 The Population: Shop Assistants, Clerks, and Other Working Class Figures Supporting the Irish “Establishment” in The Dubliners   - Reading: University of Valencia: Maria Rodriguez Moran’s “Nationalism in James Joyce” Link: University of Valencia: Maria Rodriguez Moran’s “Nationalism in James Joyce”  (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read this brief essay for a discussion of Joyce’s creation of place in his stories.  In particular, please note the mention of an Irish nationalist population in The Dubliners.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.2 Physical Descriptions of the City—Positives and Negatives   - Web Media: University College Dublin’s Irish Virtual Research Library and Archive: “The Dead, A Walking Tour” Link: University College Dublin’s Irish Virtual Research Library and Archive: “The Dead, A Walking Tour

    
 Also available in:  
    
 [iTunes
Podcast](http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-dead-walking-tour-barry/id356860233?i=80983134)  
    
 Instructions: Please listen to the entire podcast linked here,
which provides more information about the specific places mentioned
in *The Dubliners*.  
    
 Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the
kind permission of University College Dublin, and can be viewed in
its original form [here](http://www.joycesdublin.ie/).  Please note
that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in
any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder. 

2.1.3 Paralysis in the City: Images of Spiritual and Cultural Debilitation   - Reading: Hypermedia Joyce Studies: Louis Armand’s “James Joyce and the Obscene Object of Post/Humanism” Link: Hypermedia Joyce Studies: Louis Armand’s “James Joyce and the Obscene Object of Post/Humanism” (HTML)
 
Instructions:  Please read this article on paralysis in Joyce’s Dubliners.  Pay careful attention to Armand’s discussion of the implications of the word paralysis in the text.  Then think back to your reading and come up with a list of images, passages, and plot points that convey a sense of “paralysis.”  What do you think Joyce is getting at?
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.4 Community, Place, and Identity: Calling Dublin “Home”   - Reading: Hypermedia Joyce Studies: Linda Wong’s “‘Home and Elsewhere’ Fated Spaces in James Joyce’s Dubliners” Link: Hypermedia Joyce Studies: Linda Wong’s “‘Home and Elsewhere’ Fated Spaces in James Joyce’s Dubliners(HTML)
 
Instructions: Read the short piece linked here for a discussion of Ireland as “home” in the stories.  Now think about the various subjects broached in this unit of the course and work to relate them to one another.  How do concepts of home, place, paralysis, flight, and identity seem to fit together into a cohesive message?  Is there one?  
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.5 The Public and the Private: Interiors, Exteriors, and Other Spatial Considerations   - Web Media: University College Dublin’s Irish Virtual Research Library and Archive: “The Dead; 15 Usher’s Island, Joyce’s Dublin” Link: University College Dublin’s Irish Virtual Research Library: “The Dead; 15 Usher’s Island, Joyce’s Dublin

    
 Also available in:  
    
 [iTunes
Podcast](http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-dead-15-ushers-island/id356860233?i=80983099)  
    
 Instructions: Please listen to the brief podcast for a discussion
on the physical places in the Joyce’s collection of stories.  
    
 Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the
kind permission of University College Dublin, and can be viewed in
its original form [here](http://www.joycesdublin.ie/).  Please note
that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in
any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder. 

2.2 Matters of Style and Technique   2.2.1 “A Style of Scrupulous Meanness”: Objectivity and Clarity of Vision   - Reading: University of Valencia: Maria Rodriguez Moran’s “Realism and Detail in Dubliners” Link: University of Valencia: Maria Rodriguez Moran’s "Realism and Detail in Dubliners" (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please look over the brief essay for a discussion of the realism in The Dubliners.  How do you think the objectivity of the stories’ narration impacts your experience as a reader?  Why would he choose to write his stories in this mode?  How would they be different if they were written in a different style?
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.2 Genre Decisions and Conventions   - Lecture: YouTube: Great Writers Inspire: Catherine Brown’s “Literature and Form 3: Multiple Plotting” Link: YouTube: Great Writers Inspire: Catherine Brown’s “Literature and Form 3: Multiple Plotting” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch this lecture.
 
Watching this lecture and pausing to take notes should take you approximately 1 hour.
 
Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales. It is attributed to Catherine Brown and the original version can be found here.

2.2.3 Use of the Third Person and Its Narrative Effects   - Reading: World Wide Dubliners: Wallace Gray’s “James Joyce’s Dubliners: An Introduction” Link: World Wide Dubliners: Wallace Gray’s “James Joyce’s Dubliners: An Introduction”(HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the short introduction to The Dubliners for information on its narrative style.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.4 The Shaping of Epiphany   - Reading: The Modern Word: Francesca Valente “Joyce’s Dubliners as Epiphanies” Link: The Modern Word: Francesca Valente’s “Joyce’s Dubliners as Epiphanies”(HTML)   
 
Instructions: Please read the short article on the use of epiphany in The Dubliners.  Do you think this relates to the Summa Theologica you read earlier in anyway?  
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.5 The Absence of Denouement: Joyce’s Endings   - Reading: CBS’s Find Articles: Studies in Short Fiction: Michael J. O’Shea’s “Narrative Con/Texts” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

[Submit Materials](/contribute/)

2.2.6 Collection Design: From Childhood to Adulthood   - Reading: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: “Dubliners” and Simon Fraser University’s “Structure and Unity in Dubliners” Link: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: Dubliners(HTML) and Simon Fraser University’s “Structure and Unity in Dubliners (HTML)
 
Also available in:
 
Google Books (Citizen and the Artist)
 
Instructions: First, ask yourself about the overall structure or ordering of the stories in the Dubliners collection.  Why would he begin and end with the stories he does?  Do you sense a pattern?  Then click on the link above and, either using the arrows at the bottom of the document or typing in the number in the little “Go to page” box, read the section titled “Childhood” on pages 11-21, “Adolescence” on pages 21-28, and “Maturity” which is on pages 28-36.  Then read this “cheat sheet” on the schemas used in The Dubliners and think about the overall structuring and organization of the work.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.7 Thematic Structure: Beginning and Ending the Collection   - Reading: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: “Dubliners” Link: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: Dubliners  (HTML)
 
Also available in:
 
Google Books (Citizen and the Artist)
 
Instructions: Click on the link above and, either using the arrows at the bottom of the document or typing in the number in the little “Go to page” box, please read the section titled “The Schema,” which can be found on pages 1-11.  The essay provides excellent information about the overall structure of the text based on shared content and themes.  
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.3 The Dubliners Themselves: Characters and Relationships   2.3.1 The Failure of the Self: Issues of Dependence, Personal Will, and Identity   - Reading: CBS’s Find Articles: Studies in Short Fiction: Jim Haughey’s “Joyce and Trevor’s Dubliners: The Legacy of Colonialism” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

[Submit Materials](/contribute/)

2.3.2 Desire and Loss   - Reading: CBS’s Find Articles: Studies in Short Fiction: John Gordon’s “Dubliners and the Art of Losing” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

[Submit Materials](/contribute/)

2.3.3 Family and Familial Dependencies   - Reading: CBS’s Find Articles: Studies in Short Fiction: Linda Rohrer Paige’s “James Joyce’s Darkly Colored Portraits of ‘Mother’ in Dubliners” Link: CBS’s Find Articles: Studies in Short Fiction: “James Joyce’s Darkly Colored Portraits of ‘Mother’ in Dubliners’(HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the entire article for a critical discussion of Joyce’s treatment of family in his text.  In particular, the article examines the problematic nature of the mother in The Dubliners in the story titled “A Mother” as well as several of the others.  On a broader level, the article also offers an analysis of the relationship between the mother and the rest of the family.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.3.4 Marriage, Love, and Gender Relations   - Reading: CBS’s Find Articles: Studies in Short Fiction: Joseph Kelly’s “Joyce’s Marriage Cycle” Link: CBS’s Find Articles: Studies in Short Fiction: Joseph Kelly’s “Joyce’s Marriage Cycle” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the article for more information on marriage, love, and gender in The Dubliners.  
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.3.5 Entrapments: Poverty, Alcohol Abuse, and Sexual Repression   - Reading: Ohio State University’s Knowledge Bank: Joyce in the Hibernian Metropolis: Zach Bowen’s “All Things Come in Threes” Link: Ohio State University’s Knowledge Bank: Joyce in the Hibernian Metropolis: Zach Bowen’s “All Things Come in Threes” (PDF)
 
 
Instructions: Click the link above and then scroll down to the box that reads: “Files in this Item” and click on the “PDF” titled “Joyce in the Hibernian Metropolis” to download this document to your computer.  Please read the section titled “All Things Come in Threes” on pages 137-143, which discusses sexuality and alcoholism in the text, as well as a number of other topics.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.3.6 Confrontations with Death   - Reading: Morris Melotti’s “Consciousness and Death in James Joyce's Dubliners Link: Morris Melotti’s “Consciousness and Death in James Joyce's Dubliners (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read pages 97 – 131 of the dissertation.
 
Terms of use: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License. It is attributed to Morris V Melotti and the original version can be found here.

2.3.7 A Sense of Community   - Reading: CBS’s Find Articles: Studies in Short Fiction: David G. Wright’s “Interactive Stories in Dubliners” Link: CBS’s Find Articles: Studies in Short Fiction: David G. Wright’s “Interactive Stories in Dubliners(HTML)
 
Instructions: Think back on the conclusions you have drawn about identity, place, and community in The Dubliners.  Then read this brief article for an alternative take on the issue of community and belonging in the collection.  
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.4 The Dead   2.4.1 Representations of Class and Social Position   - Web Media: University College Dublin’s Irish Virtual Research Library and Archive: “The Dead Looking East or West” Link: University College Dublin’s Irish Virtual Research Library and Archive: “The Dead Looking East or West

    
 Also available in:  
    
 [iTunes
Podcast](http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-dead-looking-east-or-west/id356860233?i=80983096)  
    
 Instructions: Please listen to the entire podcast, paying close
attention to the discussion of the class system as represented in
“The Dead.”  
    
 Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the
kind permission of University College Dublin, and can be viewed in
its original form [here](http://www.joycesdublin.ie/).  Please note
that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in
any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder. 

2.4.2 Shifts in Mood: The Impact of Moving from the Joyous to the Pensive   - Reading: CBS’s Find Articles: Studies in Short Fiction: C. Roland Wagner’s “A Birth in ‘The Dead’” Link: CBS’s Find Articles: Studies in Short Fiction: C. Roland Wagner’s “A Birth in ‘The Dead’”  (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read only the first section of the article, which is under the header “Gabriel” on pages 1-4.  The article provides an analysis of the shifts in mood and tone in “The Dead.”
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: You Tube: John Huston’s The Dead Link: John Huston’s The Dead (YouTube)
     
    Instructions: Please watch the short clip from the film version of The Dead, which does an excellent job of capturing the tone of the text.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.4.3 Man and Wife—The Marital Relationship in The Dead   - Reading: Michael Murphy’s “The Dead: Gabebashing in Joyce Country: Some MsReadings of James Joyce’s Story” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

[Submit Materials](/contribute/)
  • Web Media: University College Dublin’s Irish Virtual Research Library and Archive: “The Dead; Sex, Love and Longing at The Gresham Hotel” Link: University College Dublin’s Irish Virtual Research Library and Archive: “The Dead; Sex, Love and Longing at The Gresham Hotel

     
    Also available in:
     
    iTunes Podcast
     
    Instructions: Please listen to the entirety of the podcast for a discussion of the marital relationships in “The Dead.”
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of University College Dublin, and can be viewed in its original form here.  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder. 

2.4.4 The Resources of the Individual Consciousness   - Reading: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: “Dubliners” Link: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: Dubliners (HTML)
 
Also available in:
 
Google Books
 
Instructions: Please read the section titled “Public Life,” which can be found on pages 36-45.  The section focuses on the development of the individual in the stories.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.4.5 Role of the Story in the Collection: Relationship to Other Stories; Use as an Ending   - Reading: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: “Dubliners” Link: University of Wisconsin’s James Joyce Scholars Center: Charles Peake’s James Joyce, the Citizen and the Artist: Dubliners
 
Also available in:
 
Google Books
 
Instructions: Please read the section titled “The Dead,” which is on pages 45-55.  The selection includes information about the function of “The Dead” as the conclusion of the collection, as well as more general information about its themes.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: University College Dublin’s Irish Virtual Research Library and Archive: “The Dead; Why the Story Resonates” Link: University College Dublin’s Irish Virtual Research Library and Archive: “The Dead; Why the Story Resonates

     
    Also available in:
     
    iTunes Podcast
     
    Instructions: Please listen to the entire podcast linked here for an excellent review of the story.
     
    Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of University College Dublin, and can be viewed in its original form here.  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.