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ENGL403: The Gothic Novel

Unit 2: Gothic Spaces   The ruined castle, with its gargoyles, abandoned wings, and dark dungeons, has become a Gothic cliché.  In this unit you will examine notions of space, place, and architecture as they pertain to psychology, gender relations, and questions of ownership and family inheritance in the Gothic novel.

Unit 2 Time Advisory
This unit should take approximately 42.75 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 2.1: 12.5 hours

☐    Subunit 2.2: 30.25 hours

Unit2 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:
- Explain how Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto establishes the Gothic literary tradition. - Discuss in what ways and for what reasons Walpole introduces the supernatural in The Castle of Otranto. - Explain Radcliffe’s use of the supernatural in Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho. - Discuss the treatment of Emily, the heroine in The Mysteries of Udolpho. - Discuss the use of the labyrinth motif and confined spaces in The Mysteries of Udolpho.

2.1 The Castle of Otranto, the Original Gothic Novel   - Reading: Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto Link: Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto (PDF)

 Also available in:  
 [Google
Books](http://books.google.com/books?id=_5kLAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=THE+CASTLE+OF+OTRANTO&source=bl&ots=qEcF2jlE1m&sig=9Ztya4OeY9lO_IRgvbph5kHtVgg&hl=en&ei=ZsY0TNSDE8aAlAeH3pTVBw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CCUQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q&f=false)  
 [HTML](http://castleofotranto.blogspot.com/) (Separated by
chapter)  

 Instructions: You will be reading *The Castle of Otranto* over the
course of this unit.  It may help to review the reading questions on
*The Castle of Otranto* in subunit 2.1.7 and keep them in mind as
you read the novel.  *The Castle of Otranto *is often considered the
first Gothic novel; not only does it title itself as a “Gothic
romance,” it also introduces a number of the devices and tropes that
would later become hallmarks of the Gothic.  

 Reading this text should take approximately 4 hours.  

 Terms of Use: The material above is available in the public domain.

2.1.1 The Novel’s Self-Labeling as “Gothic”   - Reading: Adam Matthew Publications: Peter Otto’s “Gothic Fiction: Introduction” Link: Adam Matthew Publications: Peter Otto’s “Gothic Fiction: Introduction” (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read this essay.  In particular, note
Walpole’s attempts to construct his own “Gothic Story” in *The
Castle of Otranto*.  Also take note of the mention of the novel’s
subtitle – *A Gothic Story*.  

 Reading this essay and taking notes should take approximately 1
hour.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.2 Antiquarianism and Medievalism   - Web Media: Yale University: The Lewis Walpole Library’s Horace Walpole’s Strawberry Hill Collection: “Virtual Tour” Link: Yale University: The Lewis Walpole Library’s Horace Walpole’s Strawberry Hill Collection: “Virtual Tour” (HTML)

 Also available:  
 [Interior
Tour](http://images.library.yale.edu/strawberryhill/tour_0_1.asp)  
 [Outside
Tour](http://images.library.yale.edu/strawberryhill/etour_01.asp)  

 Instructions: Please follow the link here for a tour of Walpole’s
own Gothic-styled mansion.  In the top right corner, you will see
links to the tour of both the interior as well as the outside of the
building.  

 Exploring this webpage should take approximately 1 hour.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Gothic Labyrinth: Monica Kanellis’ “The Mysterious Castle” and The Norton Anthology of English Literature: “Strawberry Hill” Link: Gothic Labyrinth: Monica Kanellis’ “The Mysterious Castle” (HTML) and The Norton Anthology of English Literature: “Strawberry Hill” (HTML)

    Instructions: Please read the section entitled “Antiquarianism and the Gothic.”  Then read “Strawberry Hill,” which is considered evidence of Walpole’s interest in medieval and antiquarian architecture and culture.

    Reading these resources should take approximately 45 minutes.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

2.1.3 The Figuration of the Castle   - Reading: Romanticism on the Net: Douglass H. Thomson’s “Mingled Measures: Gothic Parody in Tales of Wonder and Tales of Terror” Link: Romanticism on the Net: Douglass H. Thomson’s “Mingled Measures: Gothic Parody in Tales of Wonder and Tales of Terror (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read pages 5 and 6 of the essay, paying
special attention to Walpole’s creation of a Gothic castle-world in
the novel.  Also note Thomson’s mention of what Walpole achieved
through his creation of the Gothic castle and how it appealed to
certain classes of readers.  

 Reading this essay and taking notes should take approximately 15
minutes.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.4 Inside and Outside of the Castle: Movement, Space, and Constraint   - Reading: Romanticism on the Net: Frances A. Chiu’s “Faulty Towers: Reform, Radicalism and the Gothic Castle, 1760-1800” Link: Romanticism on the Net: Frances A. Chiu’s “Faulty Towers: Reform, Radicalism and the Gothic Castle, 1760-1800” (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read Chiu’s “Faulty Towers” for an overview of
the function of the Gothic castle in literature, especially in
Walpole’s *The Castle of Otranto*.  In particular, take note of the
mention of Gothic spaces as sorts of prisons.  

 Reading this essay and taking notes should take approximately 2
hours.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.5 Fathers and Sons: Land Ownership, Inheritance, and Filial Rupture   - Reading: Gothic Labyrinth: Monica Kanellis’ “The Mysterious Castle” and Aaborg University: Carsten Hammer Andersen’s “Patriarchal Power in The Castle of Otranto” Link: Gothic Labyrinth: Monica Kanellis’ “The Mysterious Castle” (HTML) and Aaborg University: Carsten Hammer Andersen’s “Patriarchal Power in The Castle of Otranto (HTML)

 Instructions: Read the section entitled “Inheritance,
Primogeniture, and Ential” for a commentary on the theme of filial
relationships in *The Castle of Otranto*.  Also read Andersen’s
essay for a detailed study of *The Castle of Otranto*.  

 Reading these essays should take approximately 1 hour.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.

2.1.6 Crisis in Romance: Genre and Plot Concerns   - Reading: Connotations: A Journal for Critical Debate: Brean S. Hammond’s “Romance and the Didactic in the Eighteenth-Century Novel” and Brooklyn College: Dr. Lilia Melani’s “The Gothic Experience: History” Link: Connotations: A Journal for Critical Debate: Brean S. Hammond’s “Romance and the Didactic in the Eighteenth-Century Novel” (PDF) and Brooklyn College: Dr. Lilia Melani’s “The Gothic Experience: History” (PDF)

 Instructions: Read “Romance and the Didactic in the
Eighteenth-Century Novel” for a discussion of the collapse of the
Gothic and the Romantic in eighteenth-century literature, including
Walpole’s seminal text.  To access the text, follow the link on the
right side of the page that reads: “Download the PDF of Volume 3.3.”
 The article can be found on pages 305-311.  Also review Dr.
Melani’s essay for a discussion of the development of the Gothic
novel by means of Walpole’s *The Castle of Otranto*.  As you read,
take note of the overlap between romance and supernatural themes in
Gothic literature.  

 Reading these articles should take approximately 1 hour.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.  “The Gothic Experience” has been
reposted by the kind permission of Dr. Lilia Melani from Brooklyn
College and can be viewed in its original
form [here](http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/gothic/history.html). 
Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be
reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the
copyright holder.

2.1.7 The Supernatural   - Reading: Georgia Southern University: Dr. Douglass H. Thomson’s “A Glossary of Literary Gothic Terms” and University of Maryland’s Praxis Series: Fred Botting’s “Reading Machines” Link: Georgia Southern University: Dr. Douglass H. Thomson’s “A Glossary of Literary Gothic Terms” (HTML) and University of Maryland’s Praxis Series: Fred Botting’s “Reading Machines” (HTML)

 Instructions: First, read the definition of “supernatural gadgetry”
to learn about some of the types of supernatural interventions that
occur in Walpole’s novel.  Then, read “Reading Machines” for a more
specific overview of the supernatural themes in *The Castle of
Otranto*, including broad reflections on the style of Gothic
literature.  

 Reading these articles should take approximately 30 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.

2.2 The Mysteries of Udolpho   - Reading: Brooklyn College: Dr. Lilia Melani’s “Ann Radcliffe” and Project Gutenberg: Ann Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho

Link: Brooklyn College: Dr. Lilia Melani’s [“Ann
Radcliffe”](http://www.saylor.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/engl403-2.2-Ann-Radcliffe.pdf)
(PDF) and Project Gutenberg: Ann Radcliffe’s *[The Mysteries of
Udolpho](http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3268/3268-h/3268-h.htm) *(HTML)  

 Also available in:  
 [Google
Books](http://books.google.com/books?id=CXvUWr9RDU4C&printsec=frontcover&dq=THE+MYSTERIES+OF+UDOLPHO&hl=en&ei=_sw0TMezFYOglAfcosXVBw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CC0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false)  

 Instructions: Before you read the full text of *The Mysteries of
Udolpho*, please read Dr. Melani’s “Ann Radcliffe” essay for an
introduction to the novelist and her most prominent themes.  Because
the novel is rather lengthy, you may want to break up the reading as
follows: read Volume I during subunits 2.2.1 and 2.2.2; read Volume
II during subunits 2.2.3-2.2.5; read Volume III during subunits
2.2.6 and 2.2.7; ad read Volume IV during subunits 2.2.8 and
2.2.9.  

 For many readers, *The Mysteries of Udolpho* is the archetypical
Gothic novel: crumbling castles, a damsel in distress, supernatural
events, and a brooding villain all feature prominently in the work,
making it an easy target for parody (which Jane Austen executed
brilliantly in her *Northanger Abbey*).  Even so, it is a rich find
for the Gothic enthusiast.  

 Reading these resources should take approximately 12 hours.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.  The “Ann Radcliffe” essay has been
reposted by the kind permission of Dr. Lilia Melani from Brooklyn
College and can be viewed in its original form
[here](http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/novel_18c/radcliffe/index.html). 
Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be
reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the
copyright holder.

2.2.1 The Centrality of the Castle   - Reading: University of Virginia: Norman N. Holland and Leona F. Sherman’s “Gothic Possibilities” Link: University of Virginia: Norman N. Holland and Leona F. Sherman’s “Gothic Possibilities” (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read the short excerpt of Holland and
Sherman’s “Gothic Possibilities,” focusing in particular on the
function of the castle in Radcliffe’s novel.  

 Reading this excerpt should take less than 15 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.2 Homage to Walpole: Intertextual Relations between The Mysteries of Udolpho and The Castle of Otranto   - Reading: Adam Matthew Publications: Peter Otto’s “Gothic Echoes/Gothic Labyrinths” and University of Pennsylvania: Robert D. Hume’s “Gothic versus Romantic: A Revaluation of the Gothic Novel” Link: Adam Matthew Publications: Peter Otto’s “Gothic Echoes/Gothic Labyrinths” (HTML) and University of Pennsylvania: Robert D. Hume’s “Gothic versus Romantic: A Revaluation of the Gothic Novel” (HTML)

 Instructions: Read Otto’s essay, which analyzes the tendency of
Gothic novelists to borrow motifs and themes from one another.  Then
read Hume’s essay, which discusses the development of the Gothic
novel tradition.  

 Reading these essays should take approximately 2 hours.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.
  • Reading: iTunes U: University of California, Los Angeles: Dr. Jayne Lewis’ “Priestley, Radcliffe, and the Gothic Grammar of Atmosphere” Link: iTunes U: University of California, Los Angeles: Dr. Jayne Lewis’ “Priestley, Radcliffe, and the Gothic Grammar of Atmosphere” (iTunes U)

    Instructions: Select “View in iTunes” for the “Priestley, Radcliffe, and the Gothic Grammar of Atmosphere” lecture to open it in iTunes.  Watch the lecture.

    Watching this lecture and pausing to take notes should take approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.3 Movement and Stasis: Traveling and Entrapment in the Novel   - Reading: University of Virginia: Jacques Blondel’s “On ‘Metaphysical Prisons’” and Ellen Moers’ Literary Women

Link: University of Virginia: Jacques Blondel’s [“On ‘Metaphysical
Prisons’”](http://graduate.engl.virginia.edu/enec981/Group/chris.architecture.html#blondel)
(HTML) and Ellen Moers’ *[Literary
Women](http://graduate.engl.virginia.edu/enec981/Group/ami.virgins.html#moers) *(HTML)  

 Instructions: First, read the brief excerpt from Blondel’s “On
‘Metaphysical Prisons’” for a critical reflection on the theme of
entrapment in Gothic novels.  Then read the excerpt from Moers’
*Literary Women* for more information about female entrapment in
Gothic literature.  

 Reading these excerpts should take approximately 15 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.
  • Reading: University of Virginia: Max Byrd’s “The Madhouse, the Whorehouse, and the Convent” Link: University of Virginia: Max Byrd’s “The Madhouse, the Whorehouse, and the Convent” (HTML)

    Instructions: Read this article.

    Reading this article should take approximately 15 minutes.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.2.4 Representation of Domestic Space and Gender Relations   - Reading: Gothic Labyrinth: Monica Kanellis’ “The Bloody Bedchamber” and Romanticism on the Net: Frances A. Chiu’s “Dark and Dangerous Designs: Tales of Oppression, Dispossession, and Repossession, 1770-1800” Link: Gothic Labyrinth: Monica Kanellis’ “The Bloody Bedchamber” (HTML) and Romanticism on the Net: Frances A. Chiu’s “Dark and Dangerous Designs: Tales of Oppression, Dispossession, and Repossession, 1770-1800” (HTML)

 Instructions: Read “The Bloody Bedchamber” for a quick review of
the function of domestic spaces in the Gothic novel, especially as
they pertain the restricted freedoms of women.  In Chiu’s “Dark and
Dangerous Designs,” focus on the discussion of gender politics in
*The Mysteries of Udolpho* in the section entitled “II. Politics
Gothic: Rewriting the Political Romance.”  

 Reading these articles should take approximately 1 hour and 30
minutes.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.

2.2.5 The Sublime   The “sublime” is a philosophical concept as well as a descriptive term.  Although first discussed by the ancient philosopher Longinus, the notion of the sublime receives significant critical attention in the eighteenth century by philosophers such as Edmund Burke and Immanuel Kant.  Inspired by extreme landscapes and natural phenomena such as the Alps, these thinkers articulated the concurrent yet seemingly opposite sensations associated with the sublime: inspiration, awe, and respect for that which is greater than oneself versus fear, terror, and desire to be greater than one’s current self.  The sublime, therefore, encourages man toward artistic and creative heights; at the same time, it explains how man can distort and pervert the natural world in his striving to exceed it.

  • Reading: University of Adelaide: Immanuel Kant’s The Critique of Judgement; University of Pennsylvania: Edmund Burke’s A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful; Brown University: George P. Landow’s “Eighteenth-Century Theories of the Sublime” Link: University of Adelaide: Immanuel Kant’s The Critique of Judgement (HTML); University of Pennsylvania: Edmund Burke’s A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (HTML); Brown University: George P. Landow’s “Eighteenth-Century Theories of the Sublime” (HTML)

    Also available in:
    Google Books (The Critique of Judgement)
    Google Books (A Philosophical Enquiry)

    Instructions: From Kant’s The *Critique of Judgement*, read the Preface as well as “Book II: Analytic of the Sublime,” which introduces his concept of the beautiful and the sublime.  Also read this short excerpt of Burke’s perspective on the sublime.  Then read the short piece by George P. Landow.

    Reading these resources should take approximately 6 hours.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

2.2.6 Terror versus Horror   - Reading: The Literary Gothic: Ann Radcliffe’s “On the Supernatural in Poetry” and Brooklyn College: Dr. Lilia Melani’s “Terror versus Horror” Link: The Literary Gothic: Ann Radcliffe’s “On the Supernatural in Poetry” (PDF) and Brooklyn College: Dr. Lilia Melani’s “Terror versus Horror” (PDF)

 Instructions: First, read the Radcliffe’s “On the Supernatural in
Poetry.”  To access the text, click the “On the Supernatural in
Poetry” link to download a PDF of the essay.  Then read Dr. Melani’s
“Terror versus Horror” for an alternate description of the
distinction between the two forms and a review of popular critical
understandings of both terms.  

 Reading these essays should take approximately 1 hour.  

 Terms of Use: “On the Supernatural in Poetry” is available in the
public domain.  “Terror versus Horror” article has been reposted by
the kind permission of Dr. Lilia Melani from Brooklyn College and
can be viewed in its original
form [here](http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/gothic/terror_horror.html). 
Please note that the material is under copyright and cannot be
reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the
copyright holder.

2.2.7 The Swooning Heroine, Bodily Weakness, and Victimization   - Reading: Georgia Southern University: Dr. Douglass H. Thomson’s “A Glossary of Literary Gothic Terms” and University of Virginia: Terry Castle’s “The Spectralization of the Other in The Mysteries of Udolpho” Link: Georgia Southern University: Dr. Douglass H. Thomson’s “A Glossary of Literary Gothic Terms” (PDF) and University of Virginia: Terry Castle’s “The Spectralization of the Other in The Mysteries of Udolpho (HTML)

 Instructions: Read the Thomson’s definition of “pursued heroine,”
paying special attention to its relation to the heroine of *The
Mysteries of Udolpho*.  Then read the excerpt from “The
Spectralization of the Other” for a discussion of the construction
of the heroine in Radcliffe’s novel.  

 Reading these resources should take approximately 15 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.  The “Glossary of Literary Gothic
Terms” has been reposted by the kind permission of Douglass H.
Thomson from Georgia Southern University and can be viewed in its
original
form [here](http://personal.georgiasouthern.edu/~dougt/goth.html#hau). 
Please note that the material is under copyright and cannot be
reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the
copyright holder.

2.2.8 Mystery and the Supernatural in the Novel   - Reading: University of Alberta: Dr. David S. Miall’s “The Preceptor as Fiend: Radcliffe’s Psychology of the Gothic” and University of Pennsylvania: Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “Review of Ann Radcliffe, The Mysteries of Udolpho” Link: University of Alberta: Dr. David S. Miall’s “The Preceptor as Fiend: Radcliffe’s Psychology of the Gothic” (HTML) and University of Pennsylvania: Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “Review of Ann Radcliffe, The Mysteries of Udolpho” (HTML)

 Instructions: Read Dr. Miall’s “The Preceptor as Fiend,” which
discusses the natural and supernatural in Radcliffe’s fiction.  Also
skim S.T. Coleridge’s review of *The Mysteries of Udolpho* for
another perspective on the supernatural elements in the novel.  

 Reading these articles should take approximately 4 hours.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.

2.2.9 Elements of Sensibility and Imagination versus Reason   - Reading: Georgia Southern University: Dr. Douglass H. Thomson’s “A Glossary of Literary Gothic Terms” Link: Georgia Southern University: Dr. Douglass H. Thomson’s “A Glossary of Literary Gothic Terms” (PDF)

 Instructions: Read the Dr. Thomson’s definition of “sensibility.”  

 Reading this definition should take less than 15 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: The “Glossary of Literary Gothic Terms” has been
reposted by the kind permission of Douglass H. Thomson from Georgia
Southern University and can be viewed in its original
form [here](http://personal.georgiasouthern.edu/~dougt/goth.html#sen). 
Please note that the material is under copyright and cannot be
reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the
copyright holder.