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ENGL402: The Poetry of John Milton

Unit 4: *Paradise Regained*   In this unit, we will explore one of Milton’s very last works, his brief epic Paradise Regained, which tells the story of Jesus’ temptation in the Desert, and the quest for knowledge of self and self-purpose. As with the Paradise Lost unit, we will begin by placing the work in dialogue with other texts and traditions from which Milton drew. We will then trace a number of the work’s major concerns and achievements.

Unit 4 Time Advisory
Time Advisory: This unit should take you approximately 10.25 hours.

☐    Subunit 4.1: 10 hours

☐    Subunit 4.2: 15 minutes

Unit4 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:
- explain the major plot developments that occur in Milton’s Paradise Regained;
  - compare and contrast Paradise Regained with Paradise Lost;
  - explain the intertextual situation of Paradise Regained; and
  - describe the major thematic concerns of this epic poem as well as its representations of Christ, its articulation of Milton’s doctrine of redemption, its indebtedness to the Bible, and its autobiographical reflections.

  • Reading: The Saylor Foundation: Milton’s “Paradise Regained Link: The Saylor Foundation: Milton’s “Paradise Regained”" (PDF)

    Also available in: [

    HTML](http://www.dartmouth.edu/~milton/reading_room/pr/book_1/index.shtml); eText format in Google Books (Available for Free)

    Instructions: Read Book I of Milton’s Paradise Regained to get a sense for the continuation of the story and drama of Paradise Lost. Pay attention to his style, noting consistencies between this work and his previous ones.

    Reading this text and taking notes will take approximately 4 hours and 15 minutes.

    Terms of Use: The resource above is from the Dartmouth John Milton Reading Room and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs License. The original version can be found here. The text by John Milton is in the public domain. 

  • Reading: The Saylor Foundation: The Cambridge History of English and American Literature, Vol. VII: Cavalier and Puritan, “Paradise Regained Link: The Saylor Foundation: The Cambridge History of English and American Literature, Vol. VII: Cavalier and Puritan, Paradise Regained (PDF)

    Instructions: Read this overview of “Paradise Regained” to contextualize the work further. They will - in conjunction with the pair of lectures beneath - cover units 4.1 and 4.2 below.

    Reading this text and taking notes will take approximately 15 minutes.

    Terms of Use: This reading is in the public domain.

  • Lecture: YouTube: Professor John Rogers’ Lecture #21“Paradise Regained, Books I - II” and Lecture #22 “Paradise Regained, Books III - IV” Link: YouTube: Professor John Rogers’ Lecture #21, Paradise Regained, Books I - II” (YouTube) and Lecture #22 Paradise Regained, Books III - IV” (YouTube)

    Also available in: 
    HTML, MP3, Quicktime, Flash

    Instructions: Watch this these lectures.

    Viewing these two lectures will take approximately 1 hour and 45 minutes.

    Terms of Use: These videos are released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License. The videos are reposted from Yale Open Courseware and attributed to John Rogers. The original versions can be found here

4.1 Intertextual Situation   Guiding Question:

  • What is the stylistic and biographical relationship between Paradise Regained and Paradise Lost?

4.1.1 Paradise Regained’s Biographical Relationship to *Paradise Lost*   - Reading: The Saylor Foundation: “Paradise Regained’s Biographical Relationship to Paradise Lost” Link: The Saylor Foundation: Paradise Regained’s Biographical Relationship to Paradise Lost (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read this linked page about how Milton originated the idea of writing the sequel to Paradise Lost.

 Reading this text and taking notes will take approximately 15
minutes.  

 Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).
It is attributed to The Saylor Foundation. 

4.1.2 Paradise Regained’s Stylistic Relationship to *Paradise Lost*   - Reading: The Saylor Foundation: “Paradise Regained’s Stylistic Relationship to Paradise Lost Link: The Saylor Foundation: Paradise Regained’s Stylistic Relationship to Paradise Lost(PDF)
 
Instructions: Read the linked page about the differing styles of the two epics.

 Reading this text and taking notes will take approximately 15
minutes.  

 Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).
It is attributed to The Saylor Foundation. 

4.1.3 The Biblical Version of Jesus’ Temptation   - Reading: The Saylor Foundation: World English Bible: “Matthew 4: 1 - 11”; “Luke 4: 1 - 13”; “The Book of Job” Link: The Saylor Foundation: World English Bible: “Matthew 4: 1 - 11” (PDF); “Luke 4: 1 - 13” (PDF); “The Book of Job” (PDF)

 Also available in: [  
 HTML](http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext05/web4010h.htm) (Matthew);
[HTML](http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext05/web4210h.htm) (Luke);
[HTML](http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext05/web1810h.htm) (Job)  
    
 Instructions: Read the noted verses of the Gospels of Matthew and
Luke above. Then Read this Book of Job. You will likely need this
Biblical background in order to make sense of *Paradise Lost*.  

 Reading this text and taking notes will take approximately 3 hours
and 15 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: The resources above are in the public domain. 

4.2 Thematic Concerns—Representation of Christ as Human   Guiding Question:

  • Does Milton portray Jesus as too divine, too human or just right? Why?
  • Reading: The Saylor Foundation: “Christ as Human” Link: The Saylor Foundation: “Christ as Human” (PDF)
     
    Instructions: Read the linked page about the ways Milton portrayed Jesus as human and as divine.
     
    Reading this text and taking notes will take approximately 15 minutes.

    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License. It is attributed to The Saylor Foundation.