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ENGL401: Shakespeare

Unit 5: Poetry   While he is now best known for his stage dramas, William Shakespeare was also one of the most adept and gifted poets in the English language.  Throughout much of his early life, Shakespeare wrote and published some of the most lyrically beautiful, stylistically clever, and psychologically insightful poems in the English language.  In this unit, we will closely examine Shakespeare’s poems “Venus and Adonis,” “The Rape of Lucrece,” and all 154 of his sonnets in order to reach a greater understanding of some of his intellectual and poetic influences, personal circumstances, and thematic and poetic concerns and visions.  

Unit 5 Time Advisory
This unit will take 30.5 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 5.1: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 5.2: 7 hours

☐    Subunit 5.2.1: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 5.2.2: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 5.2.3: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 5.2.4: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 5.3: 7 hours

☐    Subunit 5.3.1: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 5.3.2: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 5.3.3: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 5.4: 8.5 hours

☐    Subunit 5.4.1: .5 hours

☐    Subunit 5.4.2: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 5.4.3: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 5.4.4: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 5.4.5: 1 hour

Unit5 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  • Describe the major characteristics of Shakespearean poetry and especially of the Shakespearean sonnet.
  • Contextualize Shakespeare’s poetic work in relation to that of Ovid and Christopher Marlowe.
  • Identify instances of and define “rhyme royal.”
  • Identify and describe (and compare and contrast) the major attributes of Shakespeare’s “Fair Youth” sonnets, “Dark Lady” sonnets, and his “Sonnets to Cupid.”

5.1 Verse in Shakespeare’s Drama   - Reading: California Polytechnic State University: Dr. Debora B. Schwartz’s “Shakespearean Verse and Prose” Link:  California Polytechnic State University: Dr. Debora B. Schwartz’s “Shakespearean Verse and Prose” (HTML)
 
Instructions:  Please scroll down and read the entirety of Dr. Schwartz’s essay elaborating on the role and use of verse and prose in Shakespearean drama.  Be sure to note the major modes that Shakespeare wrote in as he drafted his plays.  
 
About the link:  Dr. Schwartz has made this webpage available through her departmental website at California Polytechnic State University.  
 
Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

5.2 Venus and Adonis   5.2.1 Introduction to Venus and Adonis   - Reading: The Saylor Foundation's version of William Shakespeare’s Venus and Adonis and The Folger Shakespeare Library: Introduction to Venus and Adonis Links: The Saylor Foundation's version of William Shakespeare’s Venus and Adonis (PDF) and The Folger Shakespeare Library: Introduction to Venus and Adonis (HTML)
 
Also available in:
HTML (poem)
ePub format on Google Books

 Instructions:  Please read Shakespeare’s text.  Then read entirety
of the Folger Shakespeare Library’s introduction to this poem.    

 About the links: The Folger Shakespeare Library is the world’s
largest and finest collection of Shakespeare materials.    
    
 Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyrights and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.

5.2.2 Relationship to Poetic Tradition: Ties with Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Marlowe’s Hero and Leander   - Reading: The Saylor Foundation's versions of Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Marlowe’s Hero and Leander; and The Saylor Foundation's "The Influence of Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Marlowe’s Hero and Leander upon Shakespeare’s Venus and Adonis"  Links:  The Saylor Foundation's versions of Ovid’s Metamorphoses(PDF) and Marlowe’s Hero and Leander (PDF); and The Saylor Foundation's "The Influence of Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Marlowe’s Hero and Leander upon Shakespeare’s Venus and Adonis" (PDF)

 Also available in: (Metamorphoses)  

[HTML](http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/2/8/2/6/28261/28621-h/28621-h.htm)  
 [eText format on the
Kindle](http://www.amazon.com/Metamorphoses-ebook/dp/B000TOD342/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2&s=digital-text&qid=1284389881&sr=1-5)  
 [ePub format on Google
Books](http://books.google.com/books?id=KEj8qFPT65sC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Metamorphoses&hl=en&ei=9juOTKrREcGC8gaQtrSdDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CDAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false)  
    
 Also available in: (Hero and Leander)  
 [HTML](http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18781/18781-h/18781-h.htm)  
 [ePub format on Google
Books](http://books.google.com/books?id=fe8VAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=Hero+and+Leander&hl=en&ei=gzyOTMWOF4H-8AaIupSVCw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCUQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false)  
    
 Instructions:  Please scroll down and read the entirety of both
Ovid’s *Metamorphoses* as well as Marlowe’s *Hero and Leander.
 *Please also read the entirety of the short Saylor Foundation essay
on the relationship between Shakespeare’s poem and the work of Ovid
and Marlowe.    

 Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyrights and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.

5.2.3 Narrative and Desire in Venus and Adonis   - Reading: Internet Shakespeare Editions: Gary Kuchar’s “Narrative and the Forms of Desire in Shakespeare’s Venus and Adonis” Link:  Internet Shakespeare Editions: Gary Kuchar’s “Narrative and the Forms of Desire in Shakespeare’s Venus and Adonis” (HTML)
 
Instructions:  Please scroll down and read the entirety of Internet Shakespeare Edition’s version of Kuchar’s essay on narrative and desire in Shakespeare’s Venus and Adonis.  Why do you think this poem would have been as immensely popular as it was during Shakespeare’s lifetime?  
   
About the link:  Kuchar, of McMaster University, originally published his essay in Early Modern Literary Studies 5.2 (September, 1999): 4.1-24, and Internet Shakespeare Edition, an website dedicated to Shakespeare’s life and work, has made the entirety of Kuchar’s essay available online.  
 
Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

5.2.4 Review of Venus and Adonis   - Web Media: The Kennedy Center: “Shakespeare: Venus and Adonis” Link:  The Kennedy Center: “Shakespeare: Venus and Adonis” (YouTube)
 
Instructions:  Please watch the entirety of this video providing an overview (and review) of the text that you have been studying.  
   
About the link:  The Kennedy Center has made the entirety of this video available for viewing online.  
 
Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

5.3 The Rape of Lucrece   5.3.1 Rhyme Royal: Matters of Form, Rhythm, and Meter   - Reading: The Saylor Foundation's version of William Shakespeare’s The Rape of Lucrece and Hudson Shakespeare Company’s Introduction to and “Commentary” upon The Rape of Lucrece Links: The Saylor Foundation's version of William Shakespeare’s The Rape of Lucrece (PDF) and Hudson Shakespeare Company’s Introduction to and “Commentary” upon The Rape of Lucrece (HTML)
 
Also available in: (Rape of Lucrece)
HTML
ePub format on Google Books
 
Instructions:  Please read Shakespeare’s text.  Then read Hudson Shakespeare Company’s commentary on this text.  
   
About the links: The Hudson Shakespeare Company is an organization dedicated to the performance, life, and work of Shakespeare and has made this text available online through the organization’s website.  
 
Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyrights and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

5.3.2 Storyline and Relationship to Ovid’s Works   - Reading: Hudson Shakespeare Company’s “The Rape of Lucrece: Synopsis” and Monmouth College: Dr. Jeremy McNamara’s “‘Ovidius Naso was the Man:’ Shakespeare’s Debt to Ovid” Links:  Hudson Shakespeare Company’s “The Rape of Lucrece: Synopsis” (HTML) and Monmouth College: Dr. Jeremy McNamara’s “‘Ovidius Naso was the Man:’ Shakespeare’s Debt to Ovid” (HTML)
 
Instructions:  Please scroll down and read the entirety of Hudson Shakespeare Company’s synopsis of this text as well as the entirety of Dr. McNamara’s essay on the Shakespeare’s debt to Ovid in writing this text.
   
About the links:  The Hudson Shakespeare Company is an organization dedicated to the performance, life, and work of Shakespeare and has made this text available online through the organization’s website.  Dr. McNamara’s essay has been made available online by Monmouth College’s website.
 
Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyrights and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

5.3.3 The Rape of Lucrece in the Context of Shakespeare’s Other Poems   - Reading: William-Shakespeare.info: “William Shakespeare Poems” Link:  William-Shakespeare.info: “William Shakespeare Poems” (HTML)
 
Instructions:  Please scroll down and read the entirety of this webpage providing the trajectory of Shakespeare’s poetry and the context of The Rape of Lucrece in this trajectory.  
   
About the link:  William-Shakespeare.info, a website dedicated to the life and work of Shakespeare, has made this document available online.  
 
Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

5.4 The Sonnets   5.4.1 Shakespeare’s Innovation with the Form   - Reading: UPenn: Dr. Al Filreis’ Explication of the “Sonnet” Link:  UPenn: Dr. Al Filreis' Explication of the "Sonnet" (HTML)
 
Instructions:  Please read the entirety of Dr. Filreis useful webpage providing explanations of the various sonnet types including the Shakespearean sonnet.  What is the Shakespearean sonnet and how does it differ from other sonnet forms?  
   
About the link:  Dr. Filreis, a professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, has made this link available through his personal website.  
 
Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

5.4.2 Portrait of a “Fair Youth:” Sonnets 1-126   - Reading: The Saylor Foundation's version of William Shakespeare’s Sonnets 1-126 and Shakespeare Oxford Society: Charlton Ogburn, Jr.’s “Shakespeare and the Fair Youth” Links: The Saylor Foundation's version of William Shakespeare’s Sonnets 1-126 (PDF) and Shakespeare Oxford Society: Charlton Ogburn, Jr.’s “Shakespeare and the Fair Youth” (HTML)
 
Also available in (complete sonnets)
HTML

[PDF](http://www.saylor.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/SAYLOR.ORG-ENGL401-SONNETS-COMPLETE.pdf)  

 Instructions:  Please the first 126 sonnets (to "CXXVI") in
Shakespeare’s text as well as the entirety of Ogburn, Jr.’s essay
introducing these sonnets.    
      
 About the links: Shakespeare Oxford Society, an organization
dedicated to researching and honoring Shakespeare, has made
available online Ogburn Jr.’s essay, originally published in the
Summer 1997 *Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter.*  
    
 Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyrights and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.

5.4.3 Romancing the “Dark Lady”: Sonnets 127-152   - Reading: The Saylor Foundation's version of William Shakespeare’s Sonnets 127-152 and Hudson Shakespeare Company’s Introduction to Shakespeare’s “Dark Lady Sonnets” Links: The Saylor Foundation's version of William Shakespeare’s Sonnets 127-152 (PDF) and Hudson Shakespeare Company’s Introduction to Shakespeare’s “Dark Lady Sonnets” (HTML)

 Also available in (complete sonnets):  
 [HTML](http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/1041/pg1041.html)  

[PDF](http://www.saylor.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/SAYLOR.ORG-ENGL401-SONNETS-COMPLETE.pdf)  

 Instructions:  Please read the sonnets named above ("CXXVI" to
"CLII") in Shakespeare’s text, as well as the entirety of Hudson
Shakespeare Company’s introduction to these sonnets.    
    
 About the links: The Hudson Shakespeare Company is an organization
dedicated to the performance, life, and work of Shakespeare and has
made this text available online through the organization’s
website.  
    
 Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyrights and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.

5.4.4 Dedicated to Cupid: Sonnets 153-154   - Reading: The Saylor Foundation's version of William Shakespeare’s Sonnets 153-154 and Shakespeares-Sonnets.com’s “Commentary on Sonnet 153 (CLIII)” Links: The Saylor Foundation's version of William Shakespeare’s Sonnets 153-154 (PDF) and Shakespeares-Sonnets.com’s “Commentary on Sonnet 153 (CLIII)” (HTML) 

 Also available in (complete sonnets):  
 [HTML](http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/1041/pg1041.html)  

[PDF](http://www.saylor.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/SAYLOR.ORG-ENGL401-SONNETS-COMPLETE.pdf)  
    
 Instructions:  Please read the sonnets named above ("CLIII" to
"CLIV") in Shakespeare’s text.  Also, please read the entirety of
Shakespeares-Sonnets.com’s commentary on sonnet 153 and introduction
and contextualization of sonnets 153 and 154.    
      
 About the links: Shakespeares-Sonnets.com, a website dedicated to
these sonnets, has made this document available through the
organization’s website.    
    
 Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyrights and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.

5.4.5 Critical Debates Surrounding the Sonnets   - Lecture: YouTube: “The University of Warwick’s and Shakespeare Birthplace Trust’s Understanding Shakespeare’s Sonnets: Celebrating the 400th Anniversary of their Publication” Link:  “The University of Warwick’s and Shakespeare Birthplace Trust’s Understanding Shakespeare’s Sonnets: Celebrating the 400th Anniversary of their Publication”(YouTube)
 
Instructions:  Please watch the entirety of this lecture, in which Professors Stanley Wells and Jonathan Bate talk to Paul Edmondson about the content, context, and critical debates of Shakespeare's collection of sonnets.  Be sure to take notes on what you recognize to be the most important critical debates raised in the lecture.  
   
About the link:  YouTube has made available online this discussion of Shakespeare’s sonnets.  
 
Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.