Loading...

ENGL101: Introduction to Literary Studies

Unit 3: Narrativity and the Novel   In the preface to his novel, The Ambassadors, Henry James once described novels as “the most independent, the most elastic, the most prodigious of literary forms.” With this high praise in mind, we will begin to examine this most popular of literary forms, from the reasons for its emergence in the first half of the eighteenth century to the mechanics of its construction. We will also acquaint ourselves with a variety of novelistic conventions and subgenres, recognizing – to quote James – the novel’s elasticity and range as a form. By the end of this unit, we will have developed an appreciation for the novel’s distinctive features – that is, what makes a novel a novel – and will be capable of both comprehending and discussing a novel at a high level, with the help of critical terms and theories.

Unit 3 Time Advisory
This unit should take approximately 35 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 3.1: 15 hours

☐    Subunit 3.1.1: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 3.1.2: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 3.1.3: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 3.1.4: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 3.1.5: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 3.1.6: 8 hours

☐    Subunit 3.2: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 3.2.1: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 3.2.2: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 3.2.3: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 3.3: 7 hours

☐    Subunit 3.3.1: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 3.3.2: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 3.3.3: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 3.3.4: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 3.3.5: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 3.4: 10 hours

Unit3 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to: - explain why the novel rose to popularity in the eighteenth century; - identify and explain the differences among a variety of novelistic forms; and - define and explain a number of novelistic devices (including, for example, characterization, viewpoint, and symbolism, to name but only a few here).

3.1 The Rise of the Novel   3.1.1 What Is a Novel?   - Reading: University of North Carolina, Pembroke: Dr. Mark Canada’s “An Introduction to the Novel” Link: University of North Carolina, Pembroke: Dr. Mark Canada’s “An Introduction to the Novel” (HTML)

 Instructions: Read Canada’s webpage for an introduction to and
brief history of the rise of the novel as a genre.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyrights and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.

3.1.2 History of the Novel   - Reading: North Virginia Community College: Dr. Agatha Taormina’s “The History of the Novel” Link: North Virginia Community College: Dr. Agatha Taormina’s “The History of the Novel” (HTML)

 Instructions: Carefully read through all five definitions of the
novel that are offered, and consider the differences among different
types of novels.  

 Consider the following study question: How do all of these
different genres of the novel differ from each other?  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyrights and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.1.3 The Spanish Picaresque, the French Romance, and Other Forerunners to the Novel   - Reading: Brooklyn College: Dr. Lilia Melani’s “The Novel” Link: Brooklyn College: Dr. Lilia Melani’s “The Novel” (PDF)

 Instructions: Read Dr. Melani’s “The Novel,” which speaks about the
development of the modern novel out of the earlier genres.  

 Terms of Use: “The Novel” has been reposted by the kind permission
of Dr. Lilia Melani from Brooklyn College and can be viewed in its
original
form [here](http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/cs6/novel.html).
Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be
reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the
copyright holder.

3.1.4 “Popular” Fiction: The Middle Class and the Novel   - Reading: Brooklyn College: Dr. Lilia Melani’s “Robinson Crusoe as Economic Man” Link: Brooklyn College: Dr. Lilia Melani’s “Robinson Crusoe as Economic Man” (PDF)

 Instructions: Read Dr. Melani’s brief discussion of the
relationship between Daniel Defoe’s novel, *Robinson Crusoe,* and
the rise of the British middle class.  

 Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the
kind permission of Dr. Lilian Melani and can be viewed in its
original form
[here](http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/novel_18c/defoe/economic.html) (HTML).
Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be
reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the
copyright holder.

3.1.5 Verisimilitude: Reality and Representation in the Novel   - Reading: Excerpts from Samuel Richardson’s Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded and The Norton Anthology of English Literature: “A Day in Eighteenth-Century London” Link: Excerpts from Samuel Richardson’s Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded (PDF) and The Norton Anthology of English Literature“A Day in Eighteenth-Century London” (HTML)

 Also Available in:  
 [PDF](http://fliiby.com/file/241492/4oew52sizz.html)  
 [Google
Books](http://books.google.com/books?id=qV9FQIJogmYC&printsec=frontcover&dq=samuel+richardson+pamela&hl=en&ei=5mozTNfgNIH7lwe5ncW-Cw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCUQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false)  

 Instructions: Read Letters X–XII and Letter XXX from Richardson’s
*Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded*, and “A Day in Eighteenth-Century
London” in the *Norton Anthology of English Literature*.  

 About the text: Epistolary in form, Samuel Richardson’s *Pamela, or
Virtue Rewarded*, is the story of a maid and her romantic affairs
with an upper-class gentleman. Along with Defoe’s *Robinson Crusoe*,
it is often considered one of the first modern novels. Richardson’s
close attention to the feelings and motives of his characters
contributed significantly to the emergence of a new subgenre, the
sensibility novel, later in the century.  

 Terms of Use: *Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded* is in the public domain.
Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the
webpage above.

3.1.6 The Form of the Novel and Early Novelistic Conventions in Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe   - Reading: Project Gutenberg’s version of Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe Link: Project Gutenberg’s version of Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (PDF)

 Instructions: Read Defoe’s novel. Often considered the first novel
in English, Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe combines elements of
adventure-writing with a keen attentiveness to the status of the
Westerner in a post-Renaissance world. The story of Robinson Crusoe
explores the relationship between man and nature, and man’s unique
ability to adapt and reconceptualize himself.  

 Terms of Use: *Robinson Crusoe* is in the public domain. Please
respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage
above.

3.2 Narrativity and the Mechanics of the Novel   3.2.1 Characterization and Conflict   - Reading: University of Southern Florida: Dr. Marilyn H. Stauffer’s “Outline on Literary Elements: Character” Link: University of Southern Florida: Dr. Marilyn H. Stauffer’s “Outline on Literary Elements: Character” (HTML)

 Instructions: Scroll down and read only Dr. Stauffer’s section on
“Character.”  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.2.2 Narrative Technique – Perspective and Style   - Reading: Oxford Tutorials’ “Viewpoint” and the Victorian Web: Dr. George P. Landow’s “How to Read a Novel” Link: Oxford Tutorials’ “Viewpoint” (PDF) and the Victorian Web: Dr. George P. Landow’s “How to Read a Novel” (HTML)

 Instructions: Scroll down and study only the selection for
“Viewpoint” from this glossary of literary terms. Also read Dr.
Landow’s piece on how to read novels.  

 Terms of Use: The Oxford Tutorials material above has been reposted
by the kind permission of Oxford Tutorials, and can be viewed in its
original form
[here](http://www.oxfordtutorials.com/AP%20Literacy%20Glossary.htm).
Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be
reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the
copyright holder. Please respect the copyrights and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.

3.2.3 Imagery, Symbolism, and Motif: Means of Establishing Theme   - Reading: Oxford Tutorials’ “Imagery, Motif, and Symbolism” Link: Oxford Tutorials’ “Imagery, Motif, and Symbolism” (PDF)

 Instructions: Scroll down and study only the selections for
“Imagery,” “Motif,” and “Symbolism” from this glossary of literary
terms.  

 Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the
kind permission of Elizabeth Wood, and can be viewed in its original
form
[here](http://www.oxfordtutorials.com/AP%20Literacy%20Glossary.htm).
Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be
reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the
copyright holder.

3.3 Novelistic Conventions   3.3.1 The Bildungsroman: Goethian Roots   - Reading: The Victorian Web: Dr. Suzanne Hader’s “Explication of the Bildungsroman” and Latrobe University: The Looking Glass: New Perspectives on Children’s Literature: LaurenBeth Signore’s “Anne of Green Gables: The Transformation from Bildungsroman to Romantic Comedy” Link: The Victorian Web: Dr. Suzanne Hader’s “Explication of the Bildungsroman (PDF) and Latrobe University: The Looking Glass: New Perspectives on Children’s Literature: LaurenBeth Signore’s “Anne of Green Gables: The Transformation from Bildungsroman to Romantic Comedy” (HTML)

 Instructions: Read Dr. Hader’s helpful analysis of this novelistic
form and LaurenBeth Signore’s insightful discussion regarding the
shifting novelistic genres in *Anne of Green Gables*.  

 Consider the following study questions: What is a Bildungsroman? 
What makes a work of literature a Bildungsroman?  

 Terms of Use: The first linked material above has been reposted by
the kind permission of Dr. Suzanne Hader, and can be viewed in its
original form [here](http://www.victorianweb.org/genre/hader1.html).
Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be
reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the
copyright holder. Please respect the copyrights and terms of use
displayed on the other web pages above.

3.3.2 The Gothic: Tropes and Modes   - Reading: University of California at Davis: David de Vore’s “The Gothic Novel” Link: University of California at Davis: David de Vore’s “The Gothic Novel” (HTML)

 Instructions: Read this webpage for an introduction to the Gothic
novel.  

 Consider the following study questions: What are the hallmarks of a
Gothic novel?  What does the term “Gothic” imply?  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.3.3 The Gothic: A Close Reading   - Reading: Horace Walpole’s Castle of Otranto and The Norton Anthology of English Literature: “Introduction to The Castle of Otranto” Link: Horace Walpole’s “Castle of Otranto” (PDF) and The Norton Anthology of English Literature: “Introduction to the Castle of Otranto (HTML)

 Instructions: Read Walpole’s *Castle of Otranto* and the brief
“Introduction” to the text from the *Norton Anthology of English
Literature*.  

 Note on the texts: *The Castle of Otranto* is considered the first
of the Gothic novels. Its antiquarianism and supernatural happenings
would become hallmarks of the genre.  

 Terms of Use: *Castle of Otranto* is in the public domain. Please
respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage
above.

3.3.4 The Epistolary Novel and Framed Narratives   - Reading: Encyclopedia Britannica’s “Epistolary Novel” and Purdue University: Dr. Dino Felluga’s “Frame Narrative” Link: Encyclopedia Britannica’s “Epistolary Novel” (HTML) and Purdue University: Dr. Dino Felluga’s “Frame Narrative” (PDF)

 Instructions: Read *Encyclopedia Britannica*’s entry on the
“epistolary novel” and Dr. Felluga’s definition of the “frame
narrative.”  

 Consider the following study questions: How are epistolary novels
structured differently than traditional novels?  What are the
purposes of a frame narrative?  

 Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the
kind permission of Dr. Dino Felluga, and can be viewed in its
original form
[here](http://www.cla.purdue.edu/academic/engl/theory/narratology/terms/framenarrative.html).  Please
note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced
in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright
holder.

3.3.5 The Novel of Manners and Victorian Culture   - Reading: Encyclopedia Britannica’s Definition of “The Novel of Manners” and The Victorian Web: Dr. Richard Kelly’s “The Novelist’s Eye”

Link: *Encyclopedia Britannica*’s Definition of [“The Novel of
Manners”](http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/421071/novel/51001/The-novel-of-manners) (HTML)
and The Victorian Web: Dr. Richard Kelly’s [“The Novelist’s
Eye”](http://www.saylor.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/The-Novelists-eye.pdf) (PDF)  

 Instructions: Read *Encyclopedia Britannica*’s explication of this
genre and Dr. Kelly’s brief essay addressing the form. Dr. Kelly is
a faculty member in the English Department at the University of
Tennessee in Knoxville.  

 Consider the following study question: What is a “novel of manners”
exactly?  

 Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the
kind permission of Dr. Richard Kelly, and can be viewed in its
original form
[here](http://www.victorianweb.org/art/illustration/dumaurier/kelly5.html) (HTML).
Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be
reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the
copyright holder.

3.3.6 Historical Novels and National Identity   - Reading: Columbia University: Dr. Frances Pritchett’s version of Shamsur Rahman Faruqi’s “The Historical Novel and the Historical Narrative”

Link: Columbia University: Dr. Frances Pritchett’s version
of Shamsur Rahman Faruqi’s [“The Historical Novel and the Historical
Narrative”](http://www.columbia.edu/itc/mealac/pritchett/00fwp/srf/) (PDF)  

 Instructions: Scroll down to and select “The Historical Novel and
the Historical Narrative” in the first half of the page. Read this
PDF concerning the historical novel and forms of historical
narrative.  

 Consider the following study questions: What makes a narrative
“historical”?  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

3.4 Convention and Parody in Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey   - Reading: Project Gutenberg’s version of Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey Link: Project Gutenberg’s version of Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey (PDF)

 Instructions: Read Austen’s novel. As you read, consider how the
novel portrays gender and class relations, the supernatural, and the
Gothic. Jane Austen, one of the most popular novelists of all time
(none of her novels have ever been out of print!), experiments with
and satirizes a number of the novelistic conventions we have
discussed in this unit in her novel *Northanger Abbey*, all the
while making serious commentary on nineteenth century society.
Austen’s novels tend to be dense and character heavy, so take your
time reading this novel. Pay close attention to the discussions that
the characters engage in with each other. Many of the key details
and ideas that the novel explores are revealed and explored in
conversations between characters.  

 Reading this novel should take approximately 8 hours.  

 Terms of Use: *Northanger Abbey* is in the public domain.
  • Activity: Historical Novel Essay Instructions: In the essay you read in subunit 3.3.6, Shamsur Faruqi says, “A historical novel is the creative imagination’s ultimate effort at making sense of things.”  In her novel, Northanger Abbey, of what is Austen attempting to make sense?  Chose one social issue that Austen explores in her novel and analyze how she does or does not make sense of that issue for her readers.