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COMM323: Comparative Media Systems

Unit 10: The Impact of New Media on Traditional Media Systems   Today, many people spend more time transmitting and receiving information on their phones than on their computers.  How do your parents and grandparents access information?  How can you make sense of such revolutionary changes in media sharing and consumption?  In this unit, you will examine the remarkable impact of new media.  This unit begins with an exploration of definitions for “new media” before delving into the influences of daily social patterns and media consumption habits.

Unit 10 Time Advisory
This unit should take approximately 18 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 10.1: 7 hours

☐    Subunit 10.1.1: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 10.1.2: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 10.1.3: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 10.1.4: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 10.2: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 10.2.1: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 10.2.2: 0.5 hours

☐    Subunit 10.2.3: 0.5 hours

☐    Subunit 10.3: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 10.3.1: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 10.3.2: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 10.4: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 10.4.1: 2 hours

☐    Subunit 10.4.2: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 10.5: 3 hours

Unit10 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to: - Define, critically examine, and explain “new media.” - Discuss personal experiences with social media. - Explain new media’s impact on media consumers and advertisers. - Discuss the development of blogging communities and the political and cultural impact of blogging. 

10.1 The Internet and Social Media   10.1.1 The Evolution of the Internet   - Reading: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication: “Chapter 11: The Internet and Social Media – Section 11.1: The Evolution of the Internet” Link: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication: “Chapter 11: The Internet and Social Media – Section 11.1: The Evolution of the Internet” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please click on the link above and read this
section.  The evolution of the Internet challenged most existing
roles and the influence of stakeholders in the media system.  How
would the government, for instance, coordinate and balance this new
medium?  How would journalists and news anchors redefine their
profession in response to the changing technology?  If you use the
classic Hallin & Mancini media system model to approach the changing
media landscape because of the introduction of the Internet, you may
realize how these big questions need to be re-examined.  This
session will introduce to you the evolution of the Internet since
“Web 1.0.”  

 Reading this article should take approximately 1 hour.  

 Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a
[CreativeCommons-Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/) without
attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee.

10.1.2 Social Media and Web 2.0   - Reading: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication: “Chapter 11 – Section 11.2: Social Media and Web 2.0” Link: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication: “Chapter 11 – Section 11.2: Social Media and Web 2.0” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please click on the link above and read section 11.2,
which discusses the phenomenon of social media and “Web 2.0,” and
looks at how it differs from traditional “Web 1.0.”  Many issues and
concepts need to be re-approached, such as user privacy.  Many
traditional ways of doing business within the media industry were
affected as well such as marketing communication.  

 Reading this article should take approximately 2 hours.  

 Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a
[CreativeCommons-Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/) without
attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee.

10.1.3 Blurred Boundary Between Mass and Interpersonal Communication   - Reading: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication: “Chapter 11 – Section 11.3: The Effects of the Internet and Globalization on Popular Culture and Interpersonal Communication” Link: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication: “Chapter 11 – Section 11.3: The Effects of the Internet and Globalization on Popular Culture and Interpersonal Communication” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please click on the link above and read this
section.  This section takes a closer look at two of the major
topics brought under the spotlight due to the revolutionary impact
of social media: how will the Internet, particularly introduction of
social media, either amply or decrease the effect of globalization
and commercialized popular culture?  How will news content migrate
on the web with more channels available to both news writers and
readers?  

 Reading this article should take approximately two hours.  

 Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a
[CreativeCommons-Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/) without
attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee.

10.1.4 Issues and Trends   - Reading: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication: “Chapter 11 – Section 11.4: Issues and Trends” Link: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication: “Chapter 11 –  Section 11.4: Issues and Trends” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please click on the link above and read this section,
which introduces the concepts surrounding the social impact of new
media, particularly “Web 2.0”: information superhighway, net
neutrality, and media literacy.  At this point you have thoroughly
reviewed new media, “Web 2.0,” and their revolutionary influence. 
The next section will introduce you to how “Web 2.0” may impact some
of the traditional roles that stakeholders play in the media
system.  

 Reading this article should take approximately 2 hours.  

 Terms of Use: The text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a
[CreativeCommons-Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/) without
attribution as requested by the work's original creator or licensee.

10.2 New Media Content Distribution Channels   10.2.1 Cable Television and Hulu   - Reading: Laptop Magazine: Jeffrey L. Wilson’s “Can Cable TV Survive the Hulu Era?” Link: Laptop Magazine: Jeffrey L. Wilson’s “Can Cable TV Survive the Hulu Era?” (HTML)

 Instructions: Please click on the link above and read this news
article.  This article invites a closer look at one of the
interesting cases that has been made relevant with the introduction
of the new media.  How can a traditional stakeholder in a media
industry, such as television, survive the competition with free
programing available online?  If you have used Hulu to watch a show,
consider the impact your personal media viewing habits may have on
the entire industry.  

 Reading this article should take approximately 1 hour.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

10.2.2 User Generated Content and YouTube   - Reading: Pew Internet: Mary Madden’s “The Audience for Online Video-Sharing Sites Shoots Up” Link: Pew Internet: Mary Madden’s “The Audience for Online Video-Sharing Sites Shoots Up” (HTML)

 Instructions: Please click on the link above and read this report,
which shares astonishing statistics about the growing audience on
online video-sharing sites, like YouTube, since 2006.  Try to
compare teen audiences with their adult counterparts; are there any
interesting findings?  Do you find that the results reflect your own
experience?  

 Reading this article should take approximately 30 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

10.2.3 From Barnes and Noble to E-Reading on the Kindle   - Reading: Digital Trends: Francis Bea’s “Barnes and Noble to unveil new Nook in late September” Link: Digital Trends: Francis Bea’s “Barnes and Noble to unveil new Nook in late September” (HTML)

 Instructions: Please click on the link above and read this article,
which discusses how a traditional market player, Barnes and Noble,
is attempting to benefit from new media technology by selling a
version of their Nook tablet in late September with capacity to run
Windows 8.  As you read, think about the rationale behind this
cooperation between Microsoft and Barnes and Noble.  

 Reading this article should take approximately 30 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

10.3 New Methods of Media Content Production   10.3.1 Removal of Traditional Gatekeepers   - Reading: Google: “About Google News” Link: Google: “About Google News” (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read all the paragraphs underneath “About
Google News” and take a look at the list of features.  Read more by
following the “learn more” links.  Pay attention to how the company
describes the process that generates its news: a “computer-generated
news site that aggregates headlines from news sources worldwide.” 
By introducing a news site like this, has Google presented a
scenario where news content flows freely to consumers without the
presence of a gatekeeper?  

 Reading this article should take approximately 1 hour.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

10.3.2 The New Information Gatekeepers   - Reading: Poynter: Rick Edmonds’ “Anti-Trust Sentiment Could Limit Google’s News Gatekeeper Power” Link: Poynter: Rick Edmonds’ “Anti-Trust Sentiment Could Limit Google’s News Gatekeeper Power” (HTML)

 Instructions: Please click on the link and read this article, which
presents a distinctively different voice from the way Google
describes its news service.  Do Google News’ competitors view the
service as simply a “computer- generated news site”?  Why or why
not?  

 Reading this article should take approximately 1 hour.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: GigaOM: Mathew Ingram’s “The rise of the new information gatekeepers” Link: GigaOM: Mathew Ingram’s “The rise of the new information gatekeepers” (HTML)

    Instruction; Please click on the link above and read this article, which expands the discussion to some of the major social media sites: Google, Apple, Twitter, and Facebook.  Why does the article call them the “new information gatekeepers”?  Does the Hallin & Mancini model still apply with the rise of new media?

    Reading this article should take approximately 1 hour.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

10.4 New Audiences: New Media’s Impact on Personal Identity   10.4.1 The Audience as Community Member   - Reading: The Boston Phoenix: Wayne Marshall’s “Nancy Baym rethinks the music industry” (HTML) Link: The Boston Phoenix: Wayne Marshall’s “Nancy Baym rethinks the music industry” (HTML)

 Instructions: Please click on the link and read this interview with
Nancy Baym, a leading scholar on online social life and former
professor of communication with the University of Kansas who now
works for Microsoft.  Pay attention to how she talks about her last
book, *Personal Connections in the Digital Age*.  

 Reading this article should take approximately 2 hours.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

10.4.2 The Audience as Content Producer   - Reading: IBM: Uche Oqbuji’s Real Web 2.0: “Wikipedia, champion of user-generated content: How Wikipedia encourages users to contribute content” Link: IBM: Uche Oqbuji’s Real Web 2.0: “Wikipedia, champion of user-generated content: How Wikipedia encourages users to contribute content” (HTML)

 Instructions: Please click on the link above and read this report. 
Have you ever edited a Wikipedia entry?  Have you recently added a
Wikipedia entry?  Read through the article and explore, for
instance, how the website lowers barriers to contribution. 
Wikipedia provides an interesting platform for users to contribute
to knowledge production.  This article explains how that process
happens.  

 Reading this article should take approximately 1 hour.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

10.5 Unit 10 Discussion   - Activity: The Saylor Foundation’s “COMM323 Course Discussion Board” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “COMM323 Course Discussion Board”
 
Instructions: After reviewing the unit materials, please post and respond to the following topics on the course discussion board.  Feel free to start your own thread and respond to other students’ postings.  Here are a few sample topics to consider as you post:

-   The evolution of the Internet challenged most existing roles or
    influences of stakeholders in our media system.  How would the
    government, for instance, coordinate and balance the
    media-government relationship?  How do media consumers to
    continuously shape and influence the media market?
-   Do you believe that major social media sites: (Google, Apple,
    Twitter, and Facebook) are the new information gatekeepers?  In
    other words, is the old market rule identified through Hallin &
    Mancini model within media systems valid in the age of the new
    media?

Posting and responding on the discussion board should take
approximately 3 hours.