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COMM103: Introduction to Mass Media

Unit 15: The Future of Mass Media   Perhaps the best way to consider the future of the media, the focus of this unit, is to consider how it may affect you.  This unit wraps up the course’s examination of where the media comes from by looking at where it is headed, but you need to realize that most of it is speculation and could change quickly as new or unexpected developments arise.  Indeed, Internet security issues, which most of us have little awareness of, are already having an impact, but because of the need for secrecy, it is difficult to take those factors into account in predicting future developments.  Other factors that can influence predictions about the future of the media range from atmospheric conditions to technological breakthroughs.  Nevertheless, your relationship to the media is not likely to change very rapidly, and oftentimes you will be in control of that change.  As you complete this final unit, review the material with a heightened awareness of the power you possess over the media: the power of choice.

Unit 15 Time Advisory
This unit should take approximately 5.5 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 15.1: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 15.2: 0.25 hours

☐    Subunit 15.3: 0.5 hours

☐    Subunit 15.4: 0.5 hours

☐    Subunit 15.5: 0.75 hours

☐    Subunit 15.6: 0.5 hours

Unit15 Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this unit, the student will be able to: - Compare and contrast traditional and new media in terms of their technology, ownership, economy, delivery methods, audiences, and future potentials. - Describe and critique how new media are affecting the production and delivery of news locally, nationally, and globally. - Predict some potential consequences of membership-only websites, micro magazines, electronic applications, and the general proliferation of media formats which cater to an increasingly narrow range of audiences. - Provide examples of how individual privacy rights are being affected by federal legislation, technology, business, and employment practices. - Explain the technology diffusion model and use it to discuss technological failures over the past decade.

15.1 Changes in Media over the Last Century: New Media   - Reading: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication: “Chapter 16, Section 1: Changes in Media over the Last Century” Link: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication“Chapter 16, Section 1: Changes in Media over the Last Century” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please focus on understanding the terms used in the
readings and how they drive the review of this unit.  In addition,
keep the outcomes listed above in mind as you read so that you are
not only absorbing facts but also the examples, relationships, and
theories that will enable you to use the information you encounter
in the manner the outcomes describe.  Note that this reading will
also cover the material you need to know for subunits
15.1.1–15.1.3.  

 Reading these sections should take approximately 15 minutes. 
Completing the exercises associated with these sections may require
an additional 15 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under
a [Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/) without
attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.
  • Reading: Utah Valley State College: Phil Gordon’s COMM 1500: Introduction to Mass Communication: “Episode 32 – Final Review” and YouTube: Gerd Leonhard’s “The Future of Media” Link: Utah Valley State College: Phil Gordon’s COMM 1500: Introduction to Mass Communication“Episode 32 – Final Review” (MP4) and YouTube: Gerd Leonhard’s “The Future of Media” (YouTube)

    Instructions: Please watch these two videos, the first of which is a review of the final exam given in the televised class whose episodes you have been viewing throughout the course.  This review may help you remember important developments and issues which you covered in this class, but perhaps of more value is how it gives you the opportunity to say good-bye to the students and professors you have watched and, hopefully, enjoyed as you worked on this course.  The second video is a lecture presented by futurist Gerd Leonhard at Media Future Week 2011 in Almere, New Zealand.  Gerd Leonhard, a fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts in London, is also an author, scholar, and popular speaker whose expertise includes “digital business models, the networked society, a sustainable business ecology, social media and social communications, TV & Radio 2.0, mobile content,” according to his website.  His YouTube speech brings up many interesting predictions about the relationship among and convergence of the media from an international perspective.

    Watching these lectures should take approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

15.1.1 Electronic Games and Entertainment   Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 15.1.  To appreciate the contents of this final chapter in the textbook, consider the points the author makes about the future of these media and then ask yourself, “What’s next?”  If you can’t come up with a generalization about what might develop in the future, think about the what you yourself would like to see develop, even if there are no indications that it will.  Identifying your own wishes for the future of the media may be more predictive that you think.  After all, chances are that if you have identified a particular need, someone else has, too, and may soon set about finding ways to satisfy it.

15.1.2 The Internet and Social Media   Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 15.1.

15.1.3 New Media versus Traditional Media   Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 15.1.

15.2 Information Delivery Methods   - Reading: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication: “Chapter 16, Section 2: Information Delivery Methods” Link: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication“Chapter 16, Section 2: Information Delivery Methods” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please focus on relating the information and examples
in this brief section to your own experiences and observations. 
After reading this material, you should recognize why, for most
people, the Internet has become their primary source of news and
information.  You should also be able to compare or contrast the
role of the Internet in your own life with the generalizations about
that role which are covered in this reading material.   

 Reading this section should take approximately 15 minutes. 
Completing the exercises associated with these sections may require
an additional 15 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under
a [Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/) without
attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

15.3 Modern Media Delivery: Pros and Cons   - Reading: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication: “Chapter 16, Section 3: Modern Media Delivery: Pros and Cons” Link: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication“Chapter 16, Section 3: Modern Media Delivery: Pros and Cons” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Please focus on understanding the terms used in the readings and how they drive the review of this unit.  In addition, keep the outcomes listed above in mind as you read so that you are not only absorbing facts but also the examples, relationships, and theories that will enable you to use the information you encounter in the manner the outcomes describe.  Note that this reading will also cover the material you need to know for subunits 15.3.1–15.3.2.
 
Reading this section should take approximately 15 minutes.  Completing the exercises associated with this section may require an additional 15 minutes.
 
Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 License without attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

15.3.1 Advantages of Modern Media Delivery   Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 15.3.  After reading this material, you should be able to produce a succinct list of the advantages of the way the media delivers information today along with experiences from your own observations which illustrate those advantages.

15.3.2 Disadvantages of Modern Media Delivery   Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 15.3.  After reading this material, you should be able to produce a succinct list of the disadvantages of the way the media delivers information today along with experiences from your own observations which illustrate those disadvantages.  In addition, you should pull from the readings ways in which you might weigh advantages against disadvantages to produce a well-reasoned defense or criticism of specific delivery techniques.

15.4 Current Trends in Electronic Media   - Reading: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication: “Chapter 16, Section 4: Current Trends in Electronic Media” Link: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication“Chapter 16, Section 4: Current Trends in Electronic Media” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please focus on understanding the terms used in the
readings and how they drive the review of this unit.  In addition,
keep the outcomes listed above in mind as you read so that you are
not only absorbing facts but also the examples, relationships, and
theories that will enable you to use the information you encounter
in the manner the outcomes describe.  Note that this reading will
also cover the material you need to know for subunits
15.4.1–15.4.3.  

 Reading this section should take approximately 15 minutes. 
Completing the exercises associated with this section may require an
additional 15 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under
a [Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/) without
attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

15.4.1 Social Networking Continues to Grow   Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 15.4.  As you read about these very small market web resources, focus on the select audiences to which they cater.  Who are those audiences and how likely will it continue to be that enough of those audiences will be available to support the resource?  Use the information in the reading to make predictions about the sustainability of the business models on which the small market resources are based.

15.4.2 Exclusivity on the Web   Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 15.4.

15.4.3 An Excess of Apps   Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 15.4.

15.5 Privacy Laws and the Impact of Digital Surveillance   - Reading: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication: “Chapter 16, Section 5: Privacy Laws and the Impact of Digital Surveillance” Link: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication“Chapter 16, Section 5: Privacy Laws and the Impact of Digital Surveillance” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please focus on understanding the terms used in the
readings and how they drive the review of this unit.  In addition,
keep the outcomes listed above in mind as you read so that you are
not only absorbing facts but also the examples, relationships, and
theories that will enable you to use the information you encounter
in the manner the outcomes describe.  Note that this reading will
also cover the material you need to know for subunits
15.5.1–15.5.3.  

 Reading this section should take approximately 15 minutes. 
Completing the exercises associated with this section may require an
additional 30 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under
a [Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/) without
attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

15.5.1 The USA PATRIOT Act: Weakening Privacy Laws or Protecting Citizens?   Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 15.5.  As you read this material, consider your own privacy needs and expectations, both online and when you use (or are used by) traditional media.  How much information about you do you feel is appropriate for the government to know?  How much do you value your privacy verses your safety?  If you were to debate this issue, how would you argue for or against breaches in privacy rights for the sake of national security?

15.5.2 Social Networking: The Blurring of Personal and Professional   Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 15.5.  When you are reading this subsection, concentrate on how the material involves freedom of expression as well as privacy.  When are your personal opinions and private behaviors online reasonable to associate with your professional life?  Try to identify the similarities and differences between online and in-person attitudes and behaviors outside of your job that could impact your position or employment.  Is attending a political rally or participating in a parade which reflects a lifestyle your employer disapproves of equally fair game for criticism as posting a negative response to an online article or blog that insulted or threatened that lifestyle?  Why or why not?

15.5.3 Restoration of Privacy   Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 15.5.  As you complete this reading, put some extra thought to the value of “https” as a way to protect your privacy.  Have you noticed its use when you are online?  Does it reassure you?  Or is it something you don’t notice when you are browsing or searching, perhaps because “https” has not yet reached a level of usefulness for you personally?

15.6 Mass Media, New Technology, and the Public   - Reading: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication: “Chapter 16, Section 6: Mass Media, New Technology, and the Public” Link: Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication“Chapter 16, Section 6: Mass Media, New Technology, and the Public” (PDF)

 Instructions: Please focus on understanding the terms used in the
readings and how they drive the review of this unit.  In addition,
keep the outcomes listed above in mind as you read so that you are
not only absorbing facts but also the examples, relationships, and
theories that will enable you to use the information you encounter
in the manner the outcomes describe.  Note that this reading will
also cover the material you need to know for subunits
15.6.1–15.6.2.  

 Reading this section should take approximately 15 minutes. 
Completing the exercises, end-of-chapter assessment, critical
thinking questions, and career connection associated with this
section may require an additional 15 minutes.  

 Terms of Use: This text was adapted by The Saylor Foundation under
a [Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/) without
attribution as requested by the work’s original creator or licensee.

15.6.1 Diffusion of Technology: The Technology Adoption Life Cycle   Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 15.5.  Please pay particular attention in reading this material on understanding the stages that mark the adoption and widening use of new technologies, both on the individual and the societal level and recognize examples from your own observations that illustrate the process.

15.6.2 Mass Media Outlets and New Technology   Note: This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 15.5.  As you complete your readings of the textbook, consider how new technologies will adapt and expand in the future in the way the iPad, iPod, and e-readers this subsection describes are experiencing.  Can you identify other media-related technology which will or should branch out into other areas of information dissemination or presentation?  If you could invest in a company which had such an idea, would you?  Why or why not?